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Trains in Italy

Travel Forums Europe Trains in Italy

1. Posted by Loisp (Budding Member 23 posts) 9y

I am really confused about the best and chepest way to get from city to city in Italy. I will be visiting Rome, Florence and Venice and I am not sure if it would be cheaper to purchase a pass or just get the tickets at the train stations. I will be there from 11-21-07 through 12-4-07. I am looking for the cheapest way possible as I am on a tight budget. Can someone help? Thanks

2. Posted by Ronnie1a (Budding Member 5 posts) 9y

The three cities you mention are all served by the Eurostar, Italy's premier train. You can save a significant amount of money by buying tickets, in advance, on the internet via Trenitalia.com. Last year I bought tickets from Rome to Venice for 29 Euro. A friend bought them at the station the day of travel and paid overe 100 Euro. It is an all reserved seat train. Your intenet booking will give you a car # and seat #. Get on the train and give the conductor your res. # . He checks via a portable computer and prints your ticket on the spot. About as easy as it gets.

3. Posted by laurim (Respected Member 260 posts) 9y

wow that's good to know. I assumed the online price would be the same price as in person. I'm torn between tickets and getting a two-country pass, though, because when pricing it out for my plans it is a little cheaper and maybe I won't have to worry about this kind of sudden price inflation.

4. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 9y

Quoting laurim

I'm torn between tickets and getting a two-country pass, though, because when pricing it out for my plans it is a little cheaper.

Are you sure about the pricing out? Take into account that in Italy there are regional trains and buses too, which are a bit slower but also cheaper than the prices quoted by agencies abroad or for high-speed trains.

I also have another tip: Buy an international ticket (regional trains only) from Rome via Florence to Venice outside Italy. (I got mine in Germany.) This ticket will be valid for 2 months and you can hop on and off along the line as much as you want. In this it is similar to a train pass, but much cheaper plus you take advantage of the discounted fare for Rome-Venice. (Rome-Venice is cheaper than Rome-Florence, Florence-Venice bought seperately.)

Search for bus fares online and compare these too.

5. Posted by laurim (Respected Member 260 posts) 9y

Quoting t_maia

Quoting laurim

I'm torn between tickets and getting a two-country pass, though, because when pricing it out for my plans it is a little cheaper.

Are you sure about the pricing out? Take into account that in Italy there are regional trains and buses too, which are a bit slower but also cheaper than the prices quoted by agencies abroad or for high-speed trains.

I also have another tip: Buy an international ticket (regional trains only) from Rome via Florence to Venice outside Italy. (I got mine in Germany.) This ticket will be valid for 2 months and you can hop on and off along the line as much as you want. In this it is similar to a train pass, but much cheaper plus you take advantage of the discounted fare for Rome-Venice. (Rome-Venice is cheaper than Rome-Florence, Florence-Venice bought seperately.)

Search for bus fares online and compare these too.

It's pretty close. Using the RailEurope site, adding up the train rides I think I'll take and assuming the ferry to Greece is included in the Eurail pass, the major train rides and ferry individually add up to about $391 vs using the Italy/Greece Eurail pass for 6 travel days is $330. Catching the ferry ride from a specific ferry line is a big if...

Milan-Venice: $47
Venice-Rimini: $50
Rimini-Florence: $43
Florence-Pisa-Cinque Terra: $16+$30 (depending on where I stay of the 5)
Cinque-Terra-Rome: $45
Rome-Bari: $54
Ferry to Petras: $106

How does someone in the US get that international, unlimited rides in 60 days pass? Usually rail passes are good for 2 months but you only get a certain number of travel days within that 2 months.

6. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 9y

Quoting laurim

How does someone in the US get that international, unlimited rides in 60 days pass?

It is not a pass, but a regular international train ticket. You get it by flying into or stopping over in another country in Europe (say France or Germany) and buying it there before going to Italy (or France). It should also be possible to buy it in the US, but then it might not be worth the extra cost the agents charge for it. It is also not unlimited, but restricts you to a certain route that you need to decide upon beforehand. (In your case Rome-Florence-Venice.) On this route you can then hop on and off as much as you like. An international ticket is usually best if you want to explore one country in depth over a longer period than that is offered by Interrail or Eurail.