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Traditional food

Travel Forums Off Topic Traditional food

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11. Posted by loubylou (Travel Guru 664 posts) 9y

In Liverpool we have a dish known as 'Scouse'. Scouse was brought to Liverpool by Northern European sailors, it was originally called Labskause. This was finally shortened to Skause and over time the spelling changed to the more Anglicised version we have today, Scouse.

The people who ate Scouse were all generally sailors and their families and eventually all sailors within Liverpool were referred to as Scousers. Time has now taken its turn and everyone from the region of Liverpool is known as a Scouser.

Basically Scouse is a beef and lamb stew with onion, carrots, potato, worcester sauce. It tastes great the next day reheated with HP sauce mixed in! After being away from home for 9 months, you start to miss some things, although Heather...black pudding is something I will NEVER miss!

12. Posted by Purdy (Travel Guru 3546 posts) 9y

Quoting loubylou

Heather...black pudding is something I will NEVER miss!

Its a acquired taste! Am l alone in being the only person out there who (admits to) likes black pudding? Or maybe l just have vampirish tendancies!!!!!

[ Edit: Edited on Aug 13, 2007, at 2:42 AM by Purdy ]

13. Posted by Delimor (Budding Member 96 posts) 9y

Quoting Elnaz

There is special food in every country as traditional food
Iranian's Traditional food is Kabab , it will make by meat and onion
we comminute them and then will mix them with some condiment and use some spur (sharp spike used in cooking)for cooking it on hearth.
But unfortunately, i cant cook it , i can only cook egg ;)
what is your traditional food ?

Well, different types of KHORESHT s like Khoresht sabzi ... its a food mix of some special vegetables frie and then boil by meat and dry lemons ( its lemon that has been dried for cooking in foods ) and beans/onion also add up with another food like POLO ( Iranian rice .. boiled rice with loads of oil or butter on it ) .. tastes really delicious.

Other kinds of Khoresht es are khoresht Khalal ( you don't have any equal for what we use in it.. its peels of almond ) and tomato chilisauce and also POLO.

Khoresht Gheime ... again same as Sabzi but instead of vegetables uses fried potato and Split Pea and also POLO :P

Halim bademjan .... Well, I really don't know how to explain it.. so delicious, you have to try it.
boiled eggplant and whey and meat.. also garlic and onion sometimes and then grind it.

In Iran there are many traditional food but the most important and famous one is Kabab ( special grilled beef or sheeps meat ) that Elnaz explained it.

14. Posted by Delimor (Budding Member 96 posts) 9y

Quoting Wonkerer

Well, I don't know if it's a traditional food, but something that seems very American to me is a peanut butter and jelly sandwich:)

Hehe... Well, actually that can be found in many places.
I think that American special food are things like Apple pie ( american apple pies are famouse ) and American hotdogs.
And International BURGER KINGS ;)

15. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 9y

Hi Elnaz

Check out the thread below:

http://www.travellerspoint.com/forum.cfm?thread=38857

Lots of stuff about local food on there.

As it says in that thread, I'm from Cumbria, England, and our main local specialities are cumberland sausage (a spicy, curly sausage) and cumberland sauce (a fruity sauce that goes well with game).

16. Posted by Elnaz (Inactive 296 posts) 9y

Quoting magykal1

Hi Elnaz

Check out the thread below:

http://www.travellerspoint.com/forum.cfm?thread=38857

Lots of stuff about local food on there.

As it says in that thread, I'm from Cumbria, England, and our main local specialities are cumberland sausage (a spicy, curly sausage) and cumberland sauce (a fruity sauce that goes well with game).

Thanks for that :-)

17. Posted by Eleniki (Full Member 125 posts) 9y

Quoting Purdy

Quoting loubylou

Heather...black pudding is something I will NEVER miss!

Its a acquired taste! Am l alone in being the only person out there who (admits to) likes black pudding? Or maybe l just have vampirish tendancies!!!!!

No! Not at all! Utrecht likes his black AND white pud better even than the sausage part of the irish/scottish breakfast (see the best breakfast thread) Clonakilty pudding is yer only man, although I love most local butcher-made Westcork puddings. The French do it really well too, specially in Normandy, the home of tripe and such-like, where they make a gourmet virtue of livestock innards and offal - if you haven't had Normandy boudin or andouillette, and you like pudding, give it a go next time you're across the channel. It comes in some mind-boggling varieties, like chestnut and apple boudin (the black pud) or garlic and rosemary andouillette (the white one). Just like sausages, you can combine any number of ingredients to alter the flavour and make an incredible taste bomb from pretty basic fare. The portugese take the whole blood and guts thing a step further with their flagship stew, the Lusitanian "cabidelas" of blood [stew of organ meats, necks, wings and blood of birds] which I came across in another guise in North Portugal, called Sarrabulho. Once you got over the blood issue, it was delicious.

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