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Why is the USA so unfriendly?

Travel Forums General Talk Why is the USA so unfriendly?

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11. Posted by Elnaz (Inactive 296 posts) 9y

The first hello to you , Josh

Excuse me, but i agree with CanadaGuy .
In every where there are good and there are bad people.
And we cannot tell that all of Americans are bad.
for example Dear Isadora is a very good person and she is an American .
I know many Americans also that they are very politely and helpful and very friendly .
for example , please think that a member in TP doesnot like my personality, is it true that he/she tells that all of Iranians are bad ?

I hope that you will change your thought :-)

12. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 9y

Hi Josh,

I would have to disagree with that, although I can see where you might be coming from as an American.

Any of the times I have visited the States, what has always been impressive is the welcome I've received there, EVEN in New York, which Americans say is probably the rudest place in the US. I have found that Americans in their own land are extremely polite, well-meaning, eager to be hospitable, and generous.

Being from Ireland, I've run into quite a few Americans over the years, as we get LOTS of them over here tracing their ancestry and what have you. When they are out of their own pond, sometimes maybe they can be a little demanding...but I've only found that with Americans of a certain age, i.e. middle-aged and upwards.

The young Americans I have met around the world, in Europe, South America, the UK are no more obnoxious than any of the rest of us can be. If anything, I even felt a bit sorry for Americans on my recent travels. In a hostel when an American joined a group, invariably one of the first things they would say is that they were anti-Bush. It's like they feel they are about to be bashed at every corner for the mistakes that have been made by that monkey over in Washington (sorry ).

Americans should hold their heads up, be good ambassadors for their country in a time when they really need all the friends they can get. I can honestly say I've never had a really bad experience with any Americans. Now, maybe I've just been lucky or something, but that's honestly how I have found it.

13. Posted by Mel. (Travel Guru 4567 posts) 9y

Quoting Elnaz

for example Dear Isadora is a very good person and she is an American .

Elnaz, u are wrong, Isadora is one of the bad Americans.

[ Edit: Edited on Sep 12, 2007, at 4:08 AM by Mel. ]

14. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 9y

Quoting samsara2

...EVEN in New York, which Americans say is probably the rudest place in the US.

A recent poll found that Californians, especially those in Los Angeles, beat out the New Yorkers in rudeness. Midwesterners were the most polite of the bunch.

When they are out of their own pond, sometimes maybe they can be a little demanding...but I've only found that with Americans of a certain age, i.e. middle-aged and upwards.

I am NOT demanding!!
I just wish you guys would make up your mind on what is ham, bacon and rashers.

If anything, I even felt a bit sorry for Americans on my recent travels. In a hostel when an American joined a group, invariably one of the first things they would say is that they were anti-Bush. It's like they feel they are about to be bashed at every corner for the mistakes that have been made by that monkey over in Washington (sorry ).

While in Ireland, we constantly came across people wanting to bash Bush and us until we stated we didn't vote for him. Following that denoucement, we were good to go with conversation. But, we had to hear all about what a lousy government we had, etc. We were there on vaction but knowing we were also representatives of our country, we listened to what others had to say. Whether anyone believes it or not, it isn't always fun having to repeat the same comments over and over while ordering your first beers. (By the way - we did NOT vote for him.)

Honestly, I could say the same about most nationalities I have come in contact with during our travels. While in a particular country, the people have been warm and very friendly. Take someone out of their element and they are no different than an American out of theirs. I have run into exceptionally rude Germans, French, Italians, etc on vacation. I have also run into exceptionally friendly Germans, French, Italians, etc. Americans are more rude to Americans than they are to others. I'm sure it is very similar in most countries.

15. Posted by zachary (Respected Member 471 posts) 9y

Josh, I've been to almost as many countries as you, and my experiences have showed me other people from other countries have rudeness much more than USA

BUT, i tend to remember that it's just my experiences, and not everyone is the same, so just because you've experienced rudeness doesnt mean we are all rude, USA has the nicest, craziest, stupidest, richest, fattest, skinniest, tallest, blackest, whitest, etc etc people in the world

16. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 9y

Hey Isa,

Well, I'm sorry that you had that experience while you were here. It's a pity that everyone's having a pop at Americans around the world. They're just easy targets I think because the US is so heavily involved in world events. I'm getting really tired of the same old conversations - people with a half-baked idea of what's going on (including myself) thinking they can expound on America and its foreign policy. I'm not saying it's not good to talk about things, of course it is, but I suppose I just had a gut-full of smug young backpackers from certain countries trying to make Americans squirm the minute they joined a conversation.

And I agree that no nation really surpasses another in terms of friendliness or otherwise, as I said. The Irish are usually remarked upon as being an extremely friendly nation and I like to think that we are but every day I see evidence that suggests the very opposite of that here at home.

I think the best one can do is to judge everyone on their own merits - as individuals I mean, and try to avoid generalizations and nation-bashing or nation-praising (or whatever terminology is appropriate).

It's a hard thing to avoid I suppose - we all do it.

17. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 9y

Quoting samsara2

Hey Isa,

Well, I'm sorry that you had that experience while you were here. It's a pity that everyone's having a pop at Americans around the world. They're just easy targets I think because the US is so heavily involved in world events. I'm getting really tired of the same old conversations - people with a half-baked idea of what's going on (including myself) thinking they can expound on America and its foreign policy. I'm not saying it's not good to talk about things, of course it is, but I suppose I just had a gut-full of smug young backpackers from certain countries trying to make Americans squirm the minute they joined a conversation.

And I agree that no nation really surpasses another in terms of friendliness or otherwise, as I said. The Irish are usually remarked upon as being an extremely friendly nation and I like to think that we are but every day I see evidence that suggests the very opposite of that here at home.

I think the best one can do is to judge everyone on their own merits - as individuals I mean, and try to avoid generalizations and nation-bashing or nation-praising (or whatever terminology is appropriate).

It's a hard thing to avoid I suppose - we all do it.

Ev, it wasn't that bad - but it does get tedious at times. It's something we took for granted would happen because we are Americans. We met absolutely wonderful people in Ireland and they weren't in attack mode - just asked if we were from the US and felt the need to give their point of view. Outside of a pub, we had a homeless man and his friend trade a song for a cigarette. The song was called "George Bush is a C*nt and a Bastard". It was hysterically funny and well done. (And they made a few Euros for their singing abilities.) As far as the young backpackers, we met Aussies, Americans and a few other nationalities at another pub and they were great as long as you let them voice their opinions. There is always going to be something that America does (because we are "all powerful") that someone doesn't like. Besides, there is very little a young backpacker could say that would make either of us squirm. (At our ages, we have lived through more history than they learned in school.) The best way to end a conversation is to let someone speak their mind for a few minutes, offer to buy them a pint and then change the subject.

As for your last statement - I agree totally. Everyone should be taken on their own merits. Though a smiley was placed at the end of the statement, I was judged a bad American a few posts back. If you ask the TP members who have met me in person, I think they would disagree. Though, I could be wrong...

18. Posted by beerman (Respected Member 1631 posts) 9y

Quoting samsara2

And I agree that no nation really surpasses another in terms of friendliness or otherwise, as I said. The Irish are usually remarked upon as being an extremely friendly nation and I like to think that we are but every day I see evidence that suggests the very opposite of that here at home.

Actually we had a lovely time.......the only rude people we ran into were the ones in Limerick. Why, I ask you, would anyone be upset at 3 people who, very innocently mind you, wind up screaming "WHERE'S EV?" in the middle of town at 3am? It got to the point where no one would answer us!! We had to resort to knocking on doors with large sticks just to get anyone's attention!! Weird, very weird......

19. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 9y

20. Posted by kombizz (Full Member 1416 posts) 9y

I am sorry to tell you that I would disagree with your generalization about American people. I live among Californian people in the Golden State. I could say all are friendly and proud.