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as american should I get an eu passport?

Travel Forums Europe as american should I get an eu passport?

1. Posted by JakubM (Budding Member, 9 posts) 23 Feb '08 18:54

I'm a US citizen living in the states who was born in Poland. I'll be travelling to europe in the fall to stay for 3-4 months. As a Polish citizen I could get an EU passport, but would there be any significant advantages to getting one? Is there anything I should consider travelling on it being a US citizen? I know travelling on two passports would be asking for possible trouble, and I'm more inclined to travel on my US passport since it's the safer thing to do. Would there be advantages with finding work or housing with the EU passport? I'm not really worried about the 90 day limit since if I do stay for 4 months, I'll just stay out of the schengen zone for 30days of that time,

I appreciate any advice,
thanks,
Jakub

2. Posted by planetdan (Budding Member, 8 posts) 24 Feb '08 03:09

If you are a US citizen born in another country, then you probably have one of those special US passports, possibly green and not the standard blue. It wouldn't hurt to get a Polish passport, if it's not too expensive or time consuming. Remember, even if you overstay the grace period for tourists with no visa, you might be questioned by the US when you return after 90 days. It would suck to get told you have to go back and do it right!

3. Posted by julianne (Budding Member, 9 posts) 24 Feb '08 08:46

Im Australian and have a British passport.
I think its much easier having an EU passport travelling around Europe.

4. Posted by jaxstar84 (Respected Member, 415 posts) 24 Feb '08 14:25

if you want to stay for 3 months then youre ok with your american status, but if your change ur mind and wanna stay for 4 months, then you cant really (because the schengen thing is only 90 days).

i reckon get the passport. its so much easier for you and itll keep ur options for how logn you can stay, wide open!

5. Posted by JakubM (Budding Member, 9 posts) 24 Feb '08 15:48

I have a regular blue US passport, I didn't know of a different green type.

other than the extended stay what benefits would an EU passport give me? Can I get a job if I have an EU passport and no permanent address in the EU? What about renting property? Can I fly out of the US on my US passport and enter on the EU passport?

My main worry with traveling on the EU passport is if for whatever reason something happened and I got sent back to Poland rather than the US and the fact that Poland still has the draft. I know these are slim possibilities, but I like planning for the worst.

I also want to figure out what the benefits of holding an EU passport are (other than not being restricted to 90 days) and factor those against the cost of getting one.

thanks for the help.

6. Posted by Hien (Moderator, 3906 posts) 24 Feb '08 16:04

Quoting JakubM

other than the extended stay what benefits would an EU passport give me? Can I get a job if I have an EU passport and no permanent address in the EU? What about renting property? Can I fly out of the US on my US passport and enter on the EU passport?

My main worry with traveling on the EU passport is if for whatever reason something happened and I got sent back to Poland rather than the US and the fact that Poland still has the draft. I know these are slim possibilities, but I like planning for the worst.

I also want to figure out what the benefits of holding an EU passport are (other than not being restricted to 90 days) and factor those against the cost of getting one.

Being an EU citizen, you are allowed to travel around EU with virtually no restriction and work anywhere in EU. However, for Polish, you may have to register with the authorities of the country you wish to work in before you start. At least this is true in the UK. Other EU countries may have different rules.

7. Posted by gaviscon (Budding Member, 68 posts) 25 Feb '08 08:37

If I were u, I rather use the US passport ;)

8. Posted by Wardsan (Travel Guru, 14 posts) 26 Feb '08 03:16

As a citizen of an EU Member State you would have a largely unrestricted right to travel, live and work (or claim benefits) throughout the EU. You can stay anywhere in the EU for ever. Other countries can only refuse entry or deport you for very good reasons (such as infectious disease or criminality). These are pretty useful rights to have!

Romanians and Bulgarians have, as yet, restricted rights to travel to work. Others have unrestricted rights. You have to register with the local authorities, but that's just a bureaucratic requirement. Officially, in the UK over 300,000 Polish citizens have registered since Poland joined the EU. Unofficially, the number of Polish migrants to the UK could well be over half a million - well over 1% of the population of Poland. Not that you need be concerned in any case as a US citizen, but Poles are very welcome here in my experience.

As a smaller matter, you get to join the EU citizens' line at airports, which means you don't get a grilling from border police and you get through quicker.

If you do want to work, or open a bank account or whatever, then you would want a local address. But that has little or nothing to do with citizenship. Non-nationals can rent or buy property here without any restrictions (which is partly why property prices in London are sky high).