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Professional Position in the EU

Travel Forums Europe Professional Position in the EU

1. Posted by farleyUL (Full Member 125 posts) 8y

I'm a graduating senior in the US and am very interested in working abroad...preferably in the EU (Spain, in particular). I have studied abroad so I have a little international experience. However, my only language proficiency is English. I have taken enough Spanish that I can get around but I am nowhere near fluent.

Any recommendations on if it would even be possible for me to work in the EU being that I'm an American citizen with no other language proficiency than English? If so, how would you recommend I go about searching for a job?

I have a year and a half of professional work experience (internship with United Parcel Service) and will have a Bachelor's degree in Finance, a Bachelor's degree in Economics, and a minor in International Business.

Thanks for any advice!

2. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 8y

Forget it, unless you hold a degree that is highly sought after or are trying to set up your own company. Degrees that are highly sought after are engineering in Germany, medicine in the UK and Germany, IT in all of Europe.

Your qualifications are just not special enough, right now Europe has enough graduates in Finance and Economics leaving uni's in the EU. And these graduates are usually fluent or reasonably competent in at least 2 major European languages (English, German, French, Spanish) aside from their own native language. Studying abroad is also not an "extra", it is a minimum requirement of European students in your field. Most go abroad twice, first to a European country (Spain, France, Germany, Poland, etc.) and second to a non-European country (USA, Australia, NZ, Russia).

Best way to get a work permit would be for you to do master's degree in Europe and then try again. Graduates are given a year to find a job suitable to their qualifications, if they manage they will be given a work permit.

For German universities the DAAD hands out scholarships to gifted students who have completed undergrad studies in their home countries. See http://www.daad.de

[ Edit: Edited on Mar 5, 2008, at 8:10 PM by t_maia ]

3. Posted by hideinpl (Budding Member 2 posts) 8y

Sorry but its not reply - its again a question...

I am holiding a Bachelor Degree in IT

I am working as a web designer since last more thn 5 yrs.. will i be able to get a good job in EU, I am already going to have Temporary Residence card in a month or so as in Poland now...

kunal

[ Edit: Edited on Mar 7, 2008, at 1:36 AM by hideinpl ]

4. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 8y

It will vary from country to country, and will depend on whether a) your degree is recognised as equivalent in that country, and b) whether the particular skills you have are in demand in that country at the time. In the UK we've just introduced a points-based system for skilled migrant workers, check here for details.

5. Posted by farleyUL (Full Member 125 posts) 8y

Ah, disappointing! I didn't figure it would be too easy. Thanks for the responses.

Cheers!

6. Posted by coldwarspy (Travel Guru 1108 posts) 8y

Forget it, unless you hold a degree that is highly sought after or are trying to set up your own company. Degrees that are highly sought after are engineering in Germany, medicine in the UK and Germany, IT in all of Europe.

Ahh cmon a bit positive thinking here ;), Im American and live in UK now as a skilled worker. But its not gna be easy. I worked as a freelance web designer and studied my Masters. Thats an option here, they throw a visa at you if you complete a degree program (Scotland).

IT is the best option, but dont give up. Look for cheap labor, bar, hotel, somethin to put food in ur mouth for a while. Make connections, It works the same way as the US, just keep an eye ou for English speaker jobs. Stay in Big cities, Madrid, Barcelona ect and you'll eventually get something. just have alot of money saved first.

But this is absolutely the best way -

Best way to get a work permit would be for you to do master's degree in Europe and then try again.

[ Edit: Edited on Mar 8, 2008, at 4:37 AM by coldwarspy ]

7. Posted by farleyUL (Full Member 125 posts) 8y

Thanks for the encouragement, coldwarspy. I think being that you're IT, you probably do have a much easier time finding jobs than I would. When I was in Europe, it seemed that many of the people I met were involved in one way or another with IT. I was wondering if you'd be able to speak to this at all...I worry about doing an MBA or some other graduate degree in Europe because I'm not sure how US companies perceive a European education if I were to try and get on at a US firm in the future (not to say that European institutions are in any way inferior to US schools). For instance, if I went to a good European business school for my Master's, but a manager was holding my resume up against someone who graduated from a run-of-the-mill MBA program like Kansas State or something, do you think I'd be at a disadvantage? Thanks again!

8. Posted by coldwarspy (Travel Guru 1108 posts) 8y

but a manager was holding my resume up against someone who graduated from a run-of-the-mill MBA program like Kansas State

I think if that were the case you would be at a disadvantage working for someone so ignorant. No, if you are looking to get a good job, actually International experience is an ADVANTAGE if nothing else.

And without sounding ignorant myself, are not all the big "US" firms actually global/worldwide companies anyway?

9. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 8y

Quoting farleyUL

For instance, if I went to a good European business school for my Master's, but a manager was holding my resume up against someone who graduated from a run-of-the-mill MBA program like Kansas State or something, do you think I'd be at a disadvantage? Thanks again!

As coldwarspy already wrote, you would only be at a disadvantage if the manager couldn't tell Berlin, Germany from Berlin, ME in the USA.

I looked at the MBA programmes in Germany for you and I think the best might be the at Berlin, Humboldt-University and at Bremen.

An M.Sc. degree in Banking from Frankfurt FSFM could also be an interesting option.

These are not the only ones, but might suit you best if you are looking for options in Germany. Berlin is a big city, nobody is going to put down HU as a small hamlet uni. Plus their international programme is widely acknowledged as being one of the best.

You can find more information about studying in Berlin here: http://www2.wiwi.hu-berlin.de/institute/mems/

[ Edit: Edited on Mar 11, 2008, at 3:01 PM by t_maia ]