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Local slang

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1. Posted by travelover (Respected Member 494 posts) 12y

Does anyone have a particular word or sentence that is used indigenously? Or a word that you use all the time (whether others do or not)? I'm talking about stuff like surfer talk (i.e. dude) and things of the like.

I recently heard of pants being used as an adjective "The weather has been pants lately" and I loved it! I have now added it to my vocabulary. Also, a word that I always use is beast. That is my word of choice. In a lot of situations.

So do tell people, what do locals in your neck of the woods say a lot?

Tam

2. Posted by Hien (Moderator 3906 posts) 12y

Haha...

That would have to be Malaysian "lah".

Below is an article from the internet about the usage of "lah".

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Title: What-lah is this all about? (Strictly Malaysian)

WHEN you speak to a Malaysian you will notice the suffix "lah" frequently occurs in conversation. What's all this, then?

"Lah" is a suffix in Malay (ed: also the national language) that is meant to add emphasis to a word or phrase. "Just do it" for example, would roughly translate into "Buat sahaja" but more forcefulness would be obtained by adding the suffix, e.g. "Buatlah sahaja".

If someone knocks at the door and you invite them in, the polite way to say that would be "Sila masuk", or "please come in". If, however, you've said it once and the person is still knocking, you just say "Masuklah" for emphasis and to tell the blur case (see our upcoming lexicon of Malaysian slang) that you heard him in the first place. There are thousands of other examples but we hope you get the drift.

Anyway, the suffix has been absorbed into English in the local vernacular, more commonly in the peninsula (ed: including Singapore!) than over in Sabah and Sarawak, and is used millions of times a day throughout the country - sometimes purposefully, sometimes for no reason at all.

When you fail to show up for work on time and the boss chews you out, a typical defence might be "Sorry boss, tired-lah."

If someone is getting a little too uptight about something, the appropriate caution to him would be "relax-lah" or "steady-lah", which urges the person to chill out, calm down, stay frosty, cool off. See? Everybody needs slang.

While purists continue to mourn the so-called "dilution" of spoken English with such colloquialisms, it is part and parcel of Malaysian life and nothing seems able to dislodge it. Stuck-lah!

Some of the many applications of "lah"

Coaxing
- Come on-lah; don't be like that-lah; please-lah

Forceful
- Shut up-lah; get out-lah; go to hell-lah

Apologetic
- Sorry-lah

Fed up
- Enough-lah

Really fed up
- xxxx-lah

Definite
- Of course-lah; sure-lah

Generous
- Take some more-lah

Unyielding
- Cannot-lah

Dumbfounded
- What-lah

Reluctant
- Dowan-lah! (A contraction of "don't want-lah")

Suggestive
- Try-lah

Agreeable
- Okay-lah

Disagreeable
- Your head-lah

Source: http://www.allmalaysia.info/msiaknow/malaysiana/what-lah.asp

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So, now you know-lah about the local slang of Malaysia.

Cheers,
Hien

[ Edit: Phrasebook inserted. ]

3. Posted by Mimi84 (Full Member 71 posts) 12y

We say things like 'rate' or 'reet' or 'right' as to mean very i.e.

That's rate good
That's reet nice
It were right good that film

other little things we tend to do in our dialect, that even people in the UK find strange are saying things like:

Is ya mam in'th ouse

Which means - is your mum in the house

Gerrin car

which means - get in the car

we also say 'tra' to say good bye or see you soon

There is also:

I've got 'fort' go now

fort meaning 'to'

I know it sounds strange and it is English and I'm sure there are many we aren't aware of. I just can't think of any more.

I live in a place near Manchester

4. Posted by mtlchica (Respected Member 922 posts) 12y

I have a few things that I use pretty regularly...but my vocabulary is an ever-changing monster

I like to say "enjoy" instead of like or cute.
EX: I really enjoy these shoes. (I really think these shoes are cute; I really like these shoes)

I use spank-tastic to describe things that are exceptionally great.
EX: I had a spank-tastic time at the amusement park!

I like to rhyme words in short phrases:
- Okie Dokie Pokie
- Sounds Like a Plan Stan
- No Prob Bob
(Which can get confusing when people think that I don't know their name...."Katie, my name is Andrew, not Stan...")

Bobo is a common one as well, to basically describe my or others stupidity in any given situation. Said as a joke...if I meant it, I wouldn't be so kind! ;) It's also used to describe the ease of something.
EX: I'm a bobo-head. (I'm stupid); I'm working at a bobo job. (My job is very easy)

And I sometimes incorperate French words into whatever I'm saying....therefore transforming the language I'm speaking to Franglais or Frenglish.

I'm sure there's more, but I can't think of them right now!

Cheers,
Katie ;)

PS: Oh! I also use two names when describing a generic person in any given situation:
- Jim Bob McGee
- Juan the Cabana Boy

5. Posted by Peter (Admin 5809 posts) 12y

Stone the crows, that cracked me up mate .. 'Juan the Cabana Boy' - more like Sheila or any Tom, Dick and Harry I reckon. Ay.

Bugger, stinker of a footy match. The bombers played the cats at the G on the tele tonight and totally karked it.

Cheers, big ears.

6. Posted by leahrb (Full Member 209 posts) 12y

this summer I met some guys from Australia and they were telling me the other night they were on a train for 13 hours and got "pissed" and they were telling me how much they had been drinking. They seemed like pretty easy going guys and couldn't figured out why they had gotten mad at each other. I found out that in Australia

pissed= drunk
in the States pissed (off) = really mad

another (somewhat interesting) question is what generic name people use for Coke or Pepsi I always call it "pop" another common name for it in the States is "soda" It mainly depends on what State you grew up in or live in.

7. Posted by bundy (Budding Member 3 posts) 12y

when downunder;aust;have a bundy&coke;rum&coke;at the local water hole;pub;get a wobly boot ;drunk; and go home by shankers pony ;walk'try not two chunder on the way home;be sick; good luck:

8. Posted by Mimi84 (Full Member 71 posts) 12y

Just to let you know people in the UK also say I 'pissed' in reference to being drunk.

9. Posted by kae (Budding Member 31 posts) 12y

this is funny..

below jokes dun involve too much slang but u can see how differentiate malaysian's english to others :

Who says our English is teruk (terrible). Just see below - Ours is simple,
short,concise, straight-to-point, effective etc. The English did invent
the English Language, but they cannot use it economically when communicating
their intentions. Compare these phrases that Malaysians and Britons use to
say the same thing: So, why make things so confusing and waste of money
when you are and a long distance call. Make it snappy.

WHEN GIVING A CUSTOMER BAD NEWS
Britons: I'm sorry, Sir, but we don't seem to have the sweater you want
in your size, but if you give me a moment, I can call the other outlets for
you.
Malaysians: No Stock.

RETURNING A CALL
Britons: Hello, this is John Smith. Did anyone page for me a few moments
ago?
Malaysians: Hallo, who page?

ASKING SOMEONE TO MAKE WAY.
Britons: Excuse me, I'd like to get by. Would you please make way?
Malaysians: S-kews

WHEN SOMEONE OFFERS TO PAY
Britons: Hey, put your wallet away, this drink is on me.
Malaysians: No-need, lah.

WHEN ASKING FOR PERMISSION
Britons: Excuse me, but do you think it would be possible for me to enter
through this door?
Malaysians: (while pointing at door) Can or not?

WHEN ENTERTAINING
Britons: Please make yourself right at home.
Malaysians: Don't be shy, lah!

WHEN DOUBTING SOMEONE
Britons: I don't recall you giving me the money.
Malaysians: Where got?

WHEN DECLINING AN OFFER
Britons: I'd prefer not to do that, if you don't mind.
Malaysians: Doe-waaaan!

IN DISAGREEING ON A TOPIC OF DISCUSSION
Britons: Err. Tom, I have to stop you there. I understand where you're
coming from, but I really have to disagree with what you said about the
issue.
Malaysians: You mad, ah?

WHEN ASKING SOMEONE TO LOWER THEIR VOICE.
Britons: Excuse me, but could you please ! lower your voice, I'm trying
to concentrate over here.
Malaysians: Shaddap lah!

WHEN ASKING SOMEONE IF HE/SHE KNOWS YOU.
Britons: Excuse me, but I noticed you staring at me for some time. Do I
know you?
Malaysians: See what, see what?

WHEN ASSESSING A TIGHT SITUATION.
Britons: We seem to be in a bit of a predicament at the moment.
Malaysians: Die-lah!!

WHEN TRYING TO FIND OUT WHAT HAD HAPPENED
Britons: Will someone tell me what has just happened?
Malaysians: Why like that???? (jumping to conclusion)

Britons: thank you kindly for clarifying the particular matter that i needed to know.."
Malaysians: "like that izzit.."

cheers....

10. Posted by travelover (Respected Member 494 posts) 12y

Perhaps stating the obvious, us Canadians say eh a lot.

Other words/sayings we (well not all Canadians... probably just me and my sister) use mostly have to do with cartoons on TV, like the Simpsons ("Fudgicle!"), and the Family Guy ("Blast!"). Other than that, we use miscreant and brigand a lot as well. And variants like brigandism.

A lot of people use "Sick" here to mean something good. Like "The party yesterday was sick!". It's kind of like saying wicked.

Oh yeah... how can I forget. I use whoopsies and ouchies a lot.