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Local slang

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11. Posted by abcdf (Full Member 557 posts) 12y

in northern california we say "hella" or "heska" a lot. it means very or alot of what ever

12. Posted by palancut (Budding Member 7 posts) 12y

hail to kae

13. Posted by YerMan (Full Member 66 posts) 11y

Following on from an earlier reply about words for getting, or being, drunk, there are dozens.

Pissed, langered, stove enamelled, hammered, gone, walloped, three sheets to the wind, gargled, wrecked, smashed, blootered etc. etc. How many others must there be?

14. Posted by travelover (Respected Member 494 posts) 11y

Stove enamelled! LOVE IT!

15. Posted by Clarabell (Travel Guru 1696 posts) 11y

Stove enamelled??!!

I love this about meeting people from different places.

Here in the UK you can go a few miles down the road and there's different words for things. One that always stands out everywhere has a word bread rolls/ buns/ breadcakes/ cobs/ baps/ barmcakes/ breadbuns/ batches/ stoaggies. Any more?

Here we say "Ah yer mashing, Duck?" To mean "would you be a darling and make me a cup of tea, old chap?"

One of my favourites is a sort of North Midlands/Yorkshire thing where somebody who is sensitive to the cold and wimpy about chilly weather is "nesh". Its such a useful word, since there's not a proper one for that in English. I'm right nesh.

I guess the fact we have so many words for getting rat-faced/ leathered/ sloshed/ is just the same as the eskimos and all their different words for snow. What does that say about us?!!

16. Posted by 4wdnoz (Budding Member 6 posts) 11y

At last, a yardstick by which you can measure an "Australian" For
those of you who haven't met an Australian and are not sure what one
is REALLY like! You're not Australian 'til...

1) You've mimicked Alf Stewart from the TV show Home and Away's
broad, Australian accent, eg. "push off, ya flamin' drongo!"
2) You've had an argument with your mate over whether Ford or Holden
makes the better car!
3) You've done the "hot sand" dance at the beach while running from
the ocean back to your towel.
4) You know who Ray Martin is.
5) You start using words like "reckon" and "root" and call people
"mate".
6) You stop greeting people with "hello" and go straight to the "how
ya doin'?"
7) You've seriously considered running down the shop in a pair of
Ugg Boots
8) You own a pair of ugg boots.
9) You've been to a day-nighter cricket match and screamed out
incomprehensibly until your throat went raw.
10) You kind of know the first verse to the national anthem, but
don't know what "girt" means.
11) You have a story that somehow revolves around excess consumption
of alcohol and a mate named "Dave".
12) You've risked attending an outdoor music festival on the hottest
day of the year.
13) You've tried to hang off a clothesline while pretending you can
fly.
14) You've had a visit to the emergency room after hanging off the
clothesline pretending you can fly.
15) You own a pair of thongs for everyday use, and another pair of
"dress thongs" for special occasions.
16) You don't know what's in a meat pie, and you don't care.
17) You pronounce Australia as "Stralya"
18) You call soccer soccer, not football!
19) You've squeezed Vegemite through vita wheat to make little
Vegemite worms.
20) You suck your coffee through a Tim Tam.
21) You realise that lifeguards are the only people who can get away
with wearing Speedos.
22) You pledge allegiance to Vegemite over Promite. (DEFINITELY)
23) You understand the value of public holidays.
24) Your weekends are spent barracking for your favourite sports
team.
25) You have a toilet dolly.
26) Your Mum or Nan made it.
27) You've played beach cricket with a tennis ball and a bat
fashioned out of a fence post.
28) You firmly believe that in the end, everything will be ok, and
have told a mate in tough times that "She'll be right, mate"
29) You use the phrase, "no worries" at least once a day.
30) You've been on a beach holiday and have probably stayed in a
caravan.
31) You constantly shorten words to "brekkie", "arvo" and "barbie"
32) You've adopted a local bar as your own.
33) You know the oath of mateship can never be limited by
geographical distance.
34) You measure a journey in beer, not kilometres or time. (That's a
3 beer trip mate) .

17. Posted by mugen (Inactive 50 posts) 11y

Hey, i'm from scotland - we've definitely got some good ones....

scots - fit like?
english - How are you?

scots - far a boots ya goin?
english - where are you going?

scots - aye, a ken
english - yes, i know

and there is this word that is used loads, only really noticed highland people using it though, its 'dreich' (making the ch sound like 'ch' in loch) and it means dark and miserable mostly used for describing a horrible day- 'oh, its driech the day jimmy', 'och aye, a ken dougal it is'!!

i left the highlands for ages and lived in london, when i came back i really noticed all the little things people say and it makes me laugh a lot - wish i could remember more right now, there are loads. my brother in law is a farmer and they all have another language completely- its super funny. oh, and 'super' is my word of the moment for describing things, it has to come before a word like good, fun, loud, hot etc...

18. Posted by travelover (Respected Member 494 posts) 11y

I have to say that I love Scottish accents so I can imagine Scots saying this stuff. Really cute!

19. Posted by WeeJoe (Respected Member 336 posts) 11y

Something that is easy to do in Ireland is: 'Wee buns'.

I've started calling everyone 'pal', this may come from hanging around with Glaswegians though.

Granny's philosophise that: 'Theres currants for buns and raisins (reasons) for everything'.

An ice-Cream is: a poke.

A 'soda' is not something that you drink but it is one of the tastiest bread products ever.

Canny means 'Can't'.

Piss: 'Pish'. So, rather than being pissed, we get 'pished' (drunk but able to speak and stand) or 'Wrote-Aff' (drunk and unable to speak or stand, from a crashed car being an insurance write-off).

There are too many of these 'subtle' differences in Ireland but one that i really want to point out is 'Craic'. 'Craic' is a Gaelic word meaning fun, often linked to drinking alcohol. Recently this word has been usurped by the English, who use it wrong (sorry people but you do). You canny have 'A craic', it doesnt make sense, its like saying 'I had a fun'. Plus they spell it 'Crack'. Ive lived in London for two years now, i think they do it just to wind me up. We don't have many of our words left, don't steal our best one! Or at least use it right. Please. Anyway, moan over.

20. Posted by Clarabell (Travel Guru 1696 posts) 11y

Ha!

So after you've finished your ice cream would you say
"Ooh I'm all sticky from that poke" ;)

So sorry Joe it's just the way my mind works!