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Extending a Visa in Germany

Travel Forums Europe Extending a Visa in Germany

1. Posted by redduck85 (Budding Member 4 posts) 8y

Hey,

I am doing a research exchange in Germany and have entered on a 90 day visa waiver (Israeli passport, same category as American or Canadian).

Due to a bit of a confusion with local bureaucratic procedures, it turns out that I won't be able to file my extension application (I need it for three weeks on top of the 90 days) until after my 90 day period expires.

Does anybody know what happens in such a case?

Thanks!

2. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 8y

Yes I know, but need more info. Why exactly can't you apply for your extension before the 90 days are up?

3. Posted by redduck85 (Budding Member 4 posts) 8y

My visa-free stay expires in about a month, but the local authority (Which btw has no-one that accepts English as a language that might be preferable to foreigners, and hardly ever has someone to pick up the phone) can only see me for an appoitment a week AFTER.

Perhaps it is my fault for not extending my visit immediately upon arrival, but I must also say that given the lack of information in English and the confusion I got from the International office at the University I am visiting did not contribute.

Thanks,

- Ron

4. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 8y

You expect a German Ausländerbehörde to communicate in English with you and pick up the phone when you call?

A few years ago I was in Israel with a similar problem (student with 3 month visa-free stay plus needing a 3 week extension) and if you had ever faced the Israeli authorities who deal with this in Israel you wouldn't complain at all!

You are right in one thing: You should have applied immediately after your arrival. The law that allows you to extend your visa even explicitely says so.

BTW, you could have asked beforehand at the German embassy and not come here when the shit is already hitting the fan!

If I was you I would find out the opening times of the Ausländerbehörde in question, recruit somebody who can speak fluent German and then go there ASAP, Thursday or Friday (24th and 25th) at the latest. Ask to speak with an official and explain the situation. Try your best not to leave the place without a "Fiktionsbescheinigung" in your hand. You'll need all the documents you'd to apply for a residency permit: anything related to your money situation (bank statements), proof of sufficient health insurance and your student status, 2 photos of you that fit the requirements for a German passport, your flight tickets home, proof of a place to stay (rental contract of your appartment) and enough money to pay the application fee of 75 EUR and a few smaller additional fees.

[ Edit: Edited on Jul 22, 2008, at 7:49 AM by t_maia ]

5. Posted by redduck85 (Budding Member 4 posts) 8y

You expect a German Ausländerbehörde to communicate in English with you and pick up the phone when you call?

Mmmm... Generally English is recognized as an international language... if you were needing passport attention in say... Thailand, you wouldn't expect to need a Thai speaking lawyer for a minor matter would you?

Perhaps I am naive to think that German bureaucrats actually do work... but I heard pretty crazy stories from my German colleagues...

A few years ago I was in Israel with a similar problem (student with 3 month visa-free stay plus needing a 3 week extension) and if you had ever faced the Israeli authorities who deal with this in Israel you wouldn't complain at all!

Most of my dealings with Israeli bureaucrats were in the Israeli missions in either Toronto or London (The places of residence in the last 10 years) and they tended to be very helpful and nice... I know bureaucrats in Israel itself tend to be assholes... I wasn't trying to praise them or anything...

What I do know (anecdotal evidence mind you) from several people is that they had no major issues... in fact one of them was a European filmmaker of non-jewish background who was hanging around politically sensitive Palestinian villages most of the time... If she managed to get along with Israeli officials, I guess it means something :)

You are right in one thing: You should have applied immediately after your arrival. The law that allows you to extend your visa even explicitely says so.

BTW, you could have asked beforehand at the German embassy and not come here when the shit is already hitting the fan!

What could have happened is not helpful... but mind you the AAA in my host university and the home university in Canada has suggested I do it here (in fact, in the AAA office here I got around 3 conflicting versions regarding visa extension regulations). I think it's rather silly that there is no centralized immigration authority, but I guess that's just me... Why would I need an appointment I do not know... my experience with Canada is that all you need to is to mail in the application and you are legally safe until a decision was reached.

If I was you I would find out the opening times of the Ausländerbehörde in question, recruit somebody who can speak fluent German and then go there ASAP, Thursday or Friday (24th and 25th) at the latest. Ask to speak with an official and explain the situation. Try your best not to leave the place without a "Fiktionsbescheinigung" in your hand. You'll need all the documents you'd to apply for a residency permit: anything related to your money situation (bank statements), proof of sufficient health insurance and your student status, 2 photos of you that fit the requirements for a German passport, your flight tickets home, proof of a place to stay (rental contract of your appartment) and enough money to pay the application fee of 75 EUR and a few smaller additional fees.

This in fact is useful information and I thank you for that... The rest was an unnecessary rant... kinda similar to the approach of the bureaucrats I dealt with so far...

Not enough opportunities to bring people to the brink of insanity on the job?

Thanks for the help!

P.S. People come to this forum to be told how stupid they were but rather see how the current situation can be improved.

6. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 8y

if you were needing passport attention in say... Thailand, you wouldn't expect to need a Thai speaking lawyer for a minor matter would you?

Yes, from what I know of Thai immigration laws I would.

Your extension in Germany is not such a simple matter as you might think because bureaucratically you are applying for a residency permit in Germany.

BTW, by German law applying in another country for a residency permit and being granted one can make the German residency permit invalid. Now I don't know about Canadian immigration law but I would carefully read the fine print. I don't suppose you want nasty surprises on your return to Canada?

Most of my dealings with Israeli bureaucrats were in the Israeli missions in either Toronto or London

You lucky sod !

I know bureaucrats in Israel itself tend to be assholes...


You got that right. A ton of forms in Hebrew that I couldn't understand, waiting in line not knowing what for and getting told to come back with more documents that I had no idea how to acquire was not fun. In the end I decided to call it quits, visit Petra in Jordan and in the process do a quick visa run. (Sorry, this won't work for you - Schengen visa law prevents this.)

What I do know (anecdotal evidence mind you) from several people is that they had no major issues... in fact one of them was a European filmmaker of non-jewish background who was hanging around politically sensitive Palestinian villages most of the time... If she managed to get along with Israeli officials, I guess it means something :)

Doesn't mean that said filmmaker didn't have people helping her. For example people speaking fluent Hebrew who contacted the Israeli embassy in advance before she went to Israel and asked for advice as well as dealt with the bureaucrats. You had to rely on incorrect information in English from the uni, I bet she got her information straight from the source the first time.

Why would I need an appointment I do not know... my experience with Canada is that all you need to is to mail in the application and you are legally safe until a decision was reached.

Well, that is the usual process here too. But processing times for applications turned in this way are over 3 months because people who turn in applications by mail are usually illegal immigrants who are trying to become legal and they are represented by lawyers. It is a very lenghty process because in quite a number of cases the people have no intention to ever get all their papers together, instead they try to extend their stay in Germany this way. Thus for simple extensions like you want it is easier to give people an appointment. If you got all the papers needed with you you can pick up the extension at the end of your appointment. I needed an appointment too when I was in Israel.

The rest was an unnecessary rant... kinda similar to the approach of the bureaucrats I dealt with so far...
Not enough opportunities to bring people to the brink of insanity on the job? People come to this forum to be told how stupid they were but rather see how the current situation can be improved.

Sorry, but sometimes people need to be told that they were stupid in order to realise it. I did not mean to insult you. I've simply run into too many Americans and Canadians who want to move to Europe (or have already done so) without ever wondering about things like residency and work permit. As an Israeli living in Canada you are not completely clueless about it, but - there is a ton you don't know yet.

7. Posted by redduck85 (Budding Member 4 posts) 8y

Hey,

1. I do not need to be told that I am stupid or was stupid... I am an educated adult with the ability to comprehend my situation :)

2. I was fully aware that something has to be done, though the law is quite confusing... If leaving the country to a non-schengen zone country such as England (where I have friends still and I could get there quite cheaply), Switzerland (Where I already visited without ever being checked) or Israel (Where I wouldn't mind visiting some relatives/friends), I would have done so... Though the schengen regulation actually does not permit that. What was the case is that I was rather surprized that the important field of immigration is handled by small time city hall clerks rather than by a centralized immigration body. I was also surprized by the amount of red-tape. As somebody coming from Canada to a country that pertains to be multicultural (Not too succesfully in my opinion) and that officially encourages the inflow of tourists, professionals and accademics, I was surprized by how such procedures are inaccesible to foreigners.

3. I have recruited my girlfriend to come from out of town (She is rather clueless on such matters but agreed to act as my German translator )... My status is as follows:

a) I have a conformation that I made an appointment... not too helpful and will probably be unecessary...

b) I will be getting the Fiktionbescheinigung next time I go to said office, contingent on bringing a valid biometric photo.

I am not fully aware what this document is, but according to my girlfriend it means that my case is being processed and I can remain as long as this is the case without becoming wretched over-stayer...

Thanks for the help ;)

P.S. The Illegal Mexican immigrant analogy that you have used is not really valid to a dumb tourist who smoked too much crap in Amsterdam and didn't realize what the date was

8. Posted by stuthkfl (Budding Member 115 posts) 7y

HERE IS A NEW QUESTION!

hello everybody, I just want to follow on this topic instead opening a new one... I want to extend my visa in Germany but I guess my situation is a bit different...

I am here for a practical training (internship). The internship duration is 2 months. I am a Turkish citizen. While applying to visa in Istanbul, they said, according to some laws, they can give a visa till the maximum of 1 week ahead than the last day of my internship.

My internship ends at 31st of July and my visa covers the 5th of August as the latest.

HOWEVER! :)

I want to travel around Europe for 15 days or 1 month... So extension is for TOURISTIC purposes...
and will not be exceeding a 90 days of stay in anyway ;)

The only thing that I can get as helpful from the upper posts is "German Ausländerbehörde" I think I must go there!

I won't have any documents from the company about extending my internship... Instead I may supply my student proof, hostel reservations and a reservation for return ticket, as the required documents for touristic visa.

I wonder that:
-am I allowed to extend my D type visa, with this documents only, which has an explanitation about "it's for internship" at its "remarks" section?
-can I get a new touristic visa here in Germany?
-schengen visa fee is 60 euro. is it same for the applications in Germany? you mention a 75 euro above, why?

does D type visa considered as a Touristic visa or a Residence permit as generally? I wonder if I am able to benefit from tax free shopping here as well

thanks for all your answers in advance!

9. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 7y

Hey Engin,

In partial reply to your query: as I understand the situation, your internship ends on 31/7 and is not extended. Right? In that case, afaics, you are still entitled to your full 90 days of tourist visa, which you could start using from August 5th onwards.

So far the easy bit. As for the application: I am not sure whether this is the same in Germany, but the Dutch regulations would require that you apply for the tourist visa in person in your country of residence. If you were in the Netherlands, you would need to return to Turkey for the application. Again, I am unsure whether this is the same in Germany.

As to fees: I do not know the specifics of the German situation, but it is normal for fees to be higher if some 'special circumstance' applies. Having your tourist visa issued in another country than your country of residence, if possible at all, would definitely be a special circumstance, so that might explain the difference.

In your case, I would do the following:

  • see the Turkish consulate about this. It may be possible for them to accept your application and forward it to the German authorities, I really wouldn't know
  • if they can't do anything for you, you need to see the Ausländerbehörde about your situation

boy I need a lot of words for a mediocre piece of advice :). By the way, re your last question: the D-type visa is a long-stay visa. Its reason is never tourism.

[ Edit: Edited on 21-Jun-2009, at 02:16 by bentivogli ]

10. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 7y

stuthkfl, I would really appreciate it if you start your own thread.

Your situation is a lot different since (as a Turkish citizen) you cannot travel around Europe visa-free.

The best solution to your problem would be to go back to Turkey and apply for a C-type Schengen visa there.

I'll discuss your problem in your own thread in detail.