Skip Navigation

Do you like meeting people from your country abroad?

Travel Forums General Talk Do you like meeting people from your country abroad?

Page

Last Post

21. Posted by mikeyBoab (Travel Guru 5077 posts) 8y

No! British tourists tend to be loud, rude and embarrassing. Well, a minority are, but it tarnishes us all with the same brush. I was reading an article about tourism in Greece at the weekend. One of the senior police officers on Rhodes island was quoted as saying "What's wrong with the British?" A good question.

22. Posted by Lachesis (Budding Member 26 posts) 8y

Quoting mikeyBoab

No! British tourists tend to be loud, rude and embarrassing. Well, a minority are, but it tarnishes us all with the same brush. I was reading an article about tourism in Greece at the weekend. One of the senior police officers on Rhodes island was quoted as saying "What's wrong with the British?" A good question.

That's exactly the reason why I said I'd recognize the greeks! I feel the same as you...
I was sitting at a street cafe in Paris, enjoying the sun, the smells and as I was looking at the people around me reading their morning newspaper I thought to myself: thank God there are no greeks here to ruin the atmosphere!

What I've heard about the British is that they drink a lot when they come here on holiday...

23. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4810 posts) 8y

Quoting Rraven

.....on the other hand my boyf' hates meeting other dutch people abroad as he says it ruins his experience but had to eat his words when we met really nice dutch last year in bolivia and colombia , and guess what, we now live near close 'ish' so we kept in touch............

I'm totally with your boyfriend on Dutch people abroad. They're horrible. Loud, obnoxious (cause no one will speak their language anyway - and they never remember all the other Dutch people who'll be there), and constantly complaining about how everything in [insert exotic place being visited here] sucks and it's much better in the Netherlands.

And yes, then there's the handful of other Dutch people who feel exactly the same way and don't act like that themselves, but instead blend in as much as possible so that you end up being surprised that hey, they were Dutch too. They're just the exceptions to prove the rule, though. And most of the time I don't mind getting to know those exceptions myself. (The weirdest one was just last week, where I attended the launch of the new album by a Melbournian singer-songwriter I like; getting the CD signed afterward, she suddenly started talking Dutch (my name is too much of a giveaway of my nationality), and it turned out her mother's Dutch and that for five years of her life she'd been living in the next village over from where I live.)

24. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 8y

Maybe it's just because we aren't Dutch... All of the Dutch we have met on our travels have been really interesting people. They complain but in the same manner we do - about our own countries and the idiocies within. Then again, most of the Dutch we have met are looking to relocate to other countries and do the ex-pat routine. (Oh, and all were of varying ages which I found interesting.)

I don't mind encountering Americans when I travel and hearing "my own language" comes in many varieties as travelers use English as a common form of communication. I hear English quite often - just with different accents. We have met several interesting Americans when traveling outside the US. I find I spend little time entertaining conversation with those I deem loud, obnoxious, etc., just as I would at home. I find a reason to cut the conversation short and go my merry way. Even when we stay at all-inclusives, that type of person rarely come back to try again. We're not rude, in fact, we're exceptionally cordial to them but show just enough disinterest to get the point across. The guy who had to announce to everyone within earshot that the resort carried "real beer" (Miller Lite) was just such a person. (He was from Milwaukee and felt the need to announce that too.) He hadn't even tried the local brew which is really quite good (Red Stripe in Jamaica).

Learning the finer points of conversation and non-conversation is key. It's actually one of those things that comes with age - or at least it should.

25. Posted by Swept Away (Travel Guru 1113 posts) 8y

Quoting Lachesis

It has never occurred to me but I don't think I would enjoy it very much. I am never prepared for such coincidences!
I think I could recognize them before hearing them talk!

Non verbal communications or body language or fashion sense, I just know if they hail from the same country.

26. Posted by norian (Full Member 71 posts) 8y

It depends. I've met some french in eastern Europe and we finished in a bar drinking some beers and talk about wot we think about the country. It was nice.

Or i remember i met a couple of french in a youth hostel. I hadn't seen some french and didn't speak french for a long time, so i was happy to speak my language.

But a bad remember. Last summer in Andalucia we've met a couple of French from Bordeaux. They criticized everything. "Everything was beautiful but not as much as Bordeaux". "People were nice but not as much as in Bordeaux". "Sea was beautiful but not as much as in Bordeaux". They were really really boring. Why did they leave Bordeaux after all ?

27. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 8y

Quoting norian

Last summer in Andalucia we've met a couple of French from Bordeaux. They criticized everything. "Everything was beautiful but not as much as Bordeaux". "People were nice but not as much as in Bordeaux". "Sea was beautiful but not as much as in Bordeaux". They were really really boring. Why did they leave Bordeaux after all ?

How else would they know Bordeaux was better?

Page