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Should people leave their culture back home.

Travel Forums General Talk Should people leave their culture back home.

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1. Posted by Swept Away (Travel Guru 1113 posts) 8y

When people leave their pathetic homeland to seek greener pastures, they tend to become more nationalistic, especially in the face of racism. They will bond with their kind and form support groups. They then become more visible and noisy! Soon the locals will hate them and the culture that they breed. A culture they once abhor.

I have worked in foreign companies in my own land and the experience of racism provoked me to be nationalistic. It was a strange reaction. But then I just need to remind myself that people hate us for the same reason I hate my culture.

I was inspired to write this by some emails I get from desperate people asking me indirectly, how I manage to stay in foreign lands. It really annoys me the thought of them invading my new havens.

I have shocked many of my foreign friends when I refused to speak in Filipino to a wife of some white guy I met in a bar. I know it was a bit rude. I can't believe I did that. I just said I don't speak that language. Because I don't. It doesn't make me less nationalistic. Our national hero prefered Spanish over Filipino. which is the language of some people in the north.

I look like a local everywhere I go and I subscribe to this wisdom, "In ROME do as the ROMANS"
So call me an elitistic bitch, but I do hail from the masses.

I just really hate the stereotype attached to my nationality. I refer to myself as Asian or Oriental. When I have 5 beers I am latino. And if I am not interested with the person talking to me, I just say I'm from NEW YORK, F off!

2. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 8y

We are who we are. There's no escaping that--even when we travel. The goal is to keep an open mind, be friendly, learn a little bit, and enjoy the culture. But we hail from home--and so we carry home with us.

No matter where I go, I'm Canadian. To refuse to speak the languages I use every day here would be to refuse to be myself. I may be embarassed by loud, obnoxious, rude fellow-Canadians from time to time, but it doesn't make me a non-Canadian. It's just makes me a different one.

3. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 8y

I agree with Tway. Without sounding too trite, I like to think of myself as an ambassador for my country when I travel. I'm very proud of being Irish, despite the drunken sterotype that is usually (and sometimes deservedly) applied to us. That's because i like to try and focus on all the positive traits that the Irish race have. Of course, there have been times when I've been a bit embarrassed by some of my fellow countrymen, and no doubt the reverse applies too!

The best thing you can do in my opinion, rather than denying your citizenship and pretending to be someone your not, you can change other people's opinion of Filipinos through your own behaviour.

You can still travel and "do as the Romans" everywhere you go, but still be who you are. I think it's really important to be comfortable with your roots, because I believe myself that you can never truly 100% belong anywhere else.

4. Posted by james (Travel Guru 4136 posts) 8y

I'm Australian and an Irish citizen and passport holder (and tend to travel with the Irish passport), and I like Swept Away's post a lot.

Although I appreciate Eve's comment, I presonally don't try to be an ambassador from any country. I'm no flag waiving Aussie. On the contrary, I find the whole flag waiving-look-at-me, [email protected] caper a load of ABSOLUTE SHIT!

5. Posted by Swept Away (Travel Guru 1113 posts) 8y

Quoting tway

I may be embarassed by loud, obnoxious, rude fellow-Canadians from time to time, but it doesn't make me a non-Canadian. It's just makes me a different one.

I regret meeting this Canadian drama queen, who speaks as if he is living in a reality show.
To call him theatrical is an understatement. The thing is he is not alone. They walk along Khaosan Road with the Mapple leaf stitched in their backpacks. They also have stickers that read, "I AM CANADIAN" subtext, "I am not American". But as they say in Thailand, "SAME, SAME".

Nationalism breeds fragmentation. In the same way religions do.
I choose to be beyond culture and race.

6. Posted by Swept Away (Travel Guru 1113 posts) 8y

Quoting james

I presonally don't try to be an ambassador from any country. I'm no flag waiving Aussie. On the contrary, I find the whole flag waiving-look-at-me, [email protected] caper a load of ABSOLUTE SHIT!

The flag waiving Aussie, what could be worst.
I met some and they have the flag, literally.

Still the OSCAR goes to the CANADIAN drama queen.

7. Posted by james (Travel Guru 4136 posts) 8y

Quoting Swept Away

The flag waiving Aussie, what could be worst.

The gun waving types. There are plenty of them.

8. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 8y

Quoting Swept Away

Quoting tway

I may be embarassed by loud, obnoxious, rude fellow-Canadians from time to time, but it doesn't make me a non-Canadian. It's just makes me a different one.

I regret meeting this Canadian drama queen, who speaks as if he is living in a reality show.
To call him theatrical is an understatement. The thing is he is not alone. They walk along Khaosan Road with the Mapple leaf stitched in their backpacks. They also have stickers that read, "I AM CANADIAN" subtext, "I am not American". But as they say in Thailand, "SAME, SAME".

Nationalism breeds fragmentation. In the same way religions do.
I choose to be beyond culture and race.

I don't mean flag wavers and drunken boasters (see my post again about those types). When I was in France, for example, every time I'd open my mouth someone would say "Ah! Vous ĂȘtes Canadienne!" And I'd say yes, and they'd tell me about relatives there, or a trip they took, or what they'd read somewhere. And we'd have a lovely little conversation, because they recognized where I was from and could relate to it in some way. I always thought it very nice.

9. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 8y

Well, I think that you can be an ambassador for your country in a quiet un-flag-waving kind of way Personally, i'm too lazy to wave a flag, and i'm not the Paddy-Goes-On-Tour type, but I'm still proud of my country and who I am.

And I think you can be nationalistic while at the same type being a worldly person. I disagree that nationalism breeds fragmentation, although I do understand your point of view Swept Away. I suppose I come from the viewpoint that in a world that seems to be becoming increasinly homogenised, I like to cling to the things I feel make me uniquely Irish while still being able to live in countries all over the world and fit in, which I feel I have done successfully. :)

10. Posted by Purdy (Travel Guru 3546 posts) 8y

Quoting james

I'm Australian and an Irish citizen and passport holder (and tend to travel with the Irish passport),

James - your one of us!!!! I knew there was a reason l liked you!!

Where you come from is purely a matter of birth - you can be patriotic without the whole shove it in someones face act. I think folk should be more concerned about how they put themselves across as a person, where they come from is secondary. But also remember where you were raised made you what you are in some small way therefore why not be proud of it. Ok so some take it too far, but usually they are the minority so why waste your time and energy even letting them get under your radar?