Skip Navigation

Page
  • 1
  • 2

Last Post

1. Posted by rys (Budding Member 21 posts) 7y

Alright...

WHV in Australia vs. a WHV in New Zealand?

I'm looking at spending 4 months working + 1 month of travel. As I've been planning it, I'd spend 4 months in Oz and the remaining month exploring NZ (primarily the South Island).

Or should I do it the other way around? 4 months working in NZ?

I love beautiful landscapes, not a lot of tourists... but somewhere where they'll hire me. ;) (Probably waitressing/bartending).

2. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4811 posts) 7y

Both countries are great, and both could do with five months of pure travel time. New Zealand is a much more accessible country, though, in that you could see a dozen different beautiful landscapes just by travelling for half a day from a central location, which in Australia is simply impossible (most directions, you'd be lucky to have the landscape change at all after half a day of travelling).
Culture-wise the two are very similar, too. Since you'd probably be working in a city, I don't think you'd notice much difference there, other than perhaps by virtue of the main Australian cities being significantly larger.

So, based on that, I'd recommend spending the majority of your time in New Zealand. Queenstown would make an excellent base; lots of tourists, alas, but also quite a bit of work, and the most gorgeous South Island landscapes right on your doorstep. Any weekend you could explore a different bit of gorgeous surroundings, while with a long weekend you could go as far as the glaciers, or to Mt. Cook & Lake Tekapo, or basically anywhere on the southern half of the South Island.

3. Posted by Daawgon (Travel Guru 1993 posts) 7y

NZ for beautiful landscapes, and AU for beautiful people (my opinion)!

4. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3713 posts) 7y

Both countries are beautiful and you should be able to pick up the kind of work you are looking for in either country. I like Sander's suggestion of basing yourself in Queenstown and taking weekend trips to other places on the South Island. There are so many options for great weekend trips wherever you are in NZ though. You could then have a month travelling in Oz and pick out a few highlights to visit.

5. Posted by rys (Budding Member 21 posts) 7y

What about the money factor? How expensive is it to live in NZ? I've heard AUS is quite pricey...at least, in Sydney. If I did go there, I'd work in Broome, Cairns, Darwin, or Perth (I think).

Staying in Queenstown sounds lovely - especially with the ability to take weekend jaunts elsewhere. Sounds like a perfect destination, in my opinion. Would buying a car be recommended for that scenario?

I was looking at going mid-July 'till mid-December... how bearable is the winter in NZ?

6. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4811 posts) 7y

Quoting rys

What about the money factor? How expensive is it to live in NZ? I've heard AUS is quite pricey...at least, in Sydney. If I did go there, I'd work in Broome, Cairns, Darwin, or Perth (I think).

Well, Australia was expensive. Until this whole financial crisis rollercoaster started. Then the Australian Dollar took a nosedive. At the moment I'd say it's back to what it was a couple of years ago, which is quite bearable. (Still, yes, Sydney is by far the most expensive city in Australia.) Meanwhile New Zealand has gotten even cheaper than it was.

I was looking at going mid-July 'till mid-December... how bearable is the winter in NZ?

It's bearable, although a lot depends on what you're used to. In July/August, up north in Auckland the average daytime temperature would be 10 degrees Celcius (Sydney would be 15). Down in Queenstown it's probably hovering around freezing, maybe even dipping below it a bit. You are up between the mountains there. On the positive side, you are up between the mountains there! Glorious snow-covered gorgeous mountains!
Problematic is that because of that, it's high season in Queenstown (everyone is there for skiing), which means that it'll be a bit harder to find accommodation, and that a lot of jobs will be filled already. I have no practical experience with how hard it'd be to find things in July. Maybe someone else here does?
(Still, I can definitely recommend winter on the South Island. There's not nearly as many good days as during the summer, but the good days you do get... Oh my! It's the perfect time of the year to stay long-term and catch a heart-stopping moment every week.)

7. Posted by freemee (Budding Member 46 posts) 7y

Out of interest your Location says USA, how have you managed to get a WHV for either?!?!

8. Posted by Hien (Moderator 3906 posts) 7y

Quoting freemee

Out of interest your Location says USA, how have you managed to get a WHV for either?!?!

Eligible US citizens can apply for Work and Holiday Visa in Australia and also NZ's Working Holiday Scheme for United States.

9. Posted by ssshauna (Budding Member 4 posts) 7y

I did aworking holiday in NZ in 2003/4 and loved it, would totallyrecommend it to anyone. I made it over to Aus for a month in the end, but was very glad that I spent most of my time in NZ.
I was living in Wellington, and had a blast. It is a beautiful city, with very friendly people, and tons of things to do in your free time no matter what your interests are. But the south island is gorgeos, and you won't go wrong there either.
Have an awesome time! You will absolutely love whatever amount of time you end up spending there! Though it was expensive when I lived there, and I can't imagine that much has changed in the recent economical 'crisis'. so don't plan to save any money, and you better have a stash to start out with just in case!

10. Posted by rys (Budding Member 21 posts) 7y

Thanks for the advice and words of encouragement. :)

Everything I've read about Queenstown sounds magnificent! Is there sufficient work for backpackers? I'm arriving at an odd time of year, I realize.

Also, public transportation in NZ... is it pretty reliable? I'd hate to go through the hassle of buying a car, but will do it, if necessary.

thanks!! :)