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What lingo have you picked up while travelling?

Travel Forums General Talk What lingo have you picked up while travelling?

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21. Posted by Cool Paul (Travel Guru 611 posts) 7y

Quoting Peter

Quoting Cool Paul

we say the "a" in tomato like the "a" in pay

and we say the "a" in pasta like the "a" in pizza....simile all'italiano

Isn't that how everyone pronounces pasta? And I had no idea that router could be pronounced "rooter". I even feel dirty typing that.

The American pronounciation of tomato makes total sense to me. Same as potato right? :) That said, I pronounce it the Australian way now. Been drilled into me.

nah the british say the first "a" in pasta like the "a" in flap or bat. but then they say the second "a" like the "a in pizza.

22. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 7y

Quoting Cool Paul

Quoting Peter

Quoting Cool Paul

we say the "a" in tomato like the "a" in pay

and we say the "a" in pasta like the "a" in pizza....simile all'italiano

Isn't that how everyone pronounces pasta? And I had no idea that router could be pronounced "rooter". I even feel dirty typing that.

The American pronounciation of tomato makes total sense to me. Same as potato right? :) That said, I pronounce it the Australian way now. Been drilled into me.

nah the british say the first "a" in pasta like the "a" in flap or bat. but then they say the second "a" like the "a in pizza.

Most people I know say "PAH-sta", but they grew up speaking Italian at home...

23. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 7y

Quoting Cool Paul

Quoting Peter

Quoting Cool Paul

we say the "a" in tomato like the "a" in pay

and we say the "a" in pasta like the "a" in pizza....simile all'italiano

Isn't that how everyone pronounces pasta? And I had no idea that router could be pronounced "rooter". I even feel dirty typing that.

The American pronounciation of tomato makes total sense to me. Same as potato right? :) That said, I pronounce it the Australian way now. Been drilled into me.

nah the british say the first "a" in pasta like the "a" in flap or bat. but then they say the second "a" like the "a in pizza.

Ah yes, I have heard that. You wrote "Europeans" - I tend to think of mainland Europeans then, not the British, although both are of course European. And mainland Europeans don't pronounce it that way. At least none that I know. Is this pronounciation true for all British, or just certain dialects? It is weird, I'll give you that. Reminds me of pronouncing Italian "eye-talian"

24. Posted by Hien (Moderator 3906 posts) 7y

Quoting Cool Paul

I can't believe how many British, Irish, Kiwi, and Aussie men AND women say c*nt! seriously though a lot of them drop the C-bomb like it was bread crumbs.

That word is a big no no in North America. That's one of those words like the N-word. you just don't say it....in public...or around people you don't know.

I hear you! My flatmate is British but grew up in Australia, and he says that c-word very often! Whenever I said something like "no, you can't ..." (the British pronunciation of can't) and he'd joke with me saying, "are you calling me a c*nt?!"

25. Posted by Hien (Moderator 3906 posts) 7y

Quoting gocebe

Also I hate the fact that Americans do not pronounce the letter "t" in most words. That's why I can never say Connecticut!

I noticed this, too, in many British and native speakers I've met and saw on TV. The "t" at the start and end of a word is pronounced (though the end t is not stressed) while the "t" in the middle of a word is swallowed in many words. For example, the word Britain sounded like Bric'ain.

I guess they pronounce Connecticut as Connec'icut over there?

26. Posted by Hien (Moderator 3906 posts) 7y

Quoting Peter

And I had no idea that router could be pronounced "rooter". I even feel dirty typing that.

Actually, it makes perfect sense to pronounce router as "rooter", as the base word is route ("root"). Many Americans pronounce it as "raut", which eventually made router to become "rauter".


The American pronounciation of tomato makes total sense to me. Same as potato right? :) That said, I pronounce it the Australian way now. Been drilled into me.

I'm guessing the Australian way is the same as the British to-MAH-to?

I know some Malaysians pronounce it as to-MEH-to.

27. Posted by Hien (Moderator 3906 posts) 7y

Quoting Peter

Quoting Cool Paul

Quoting Peter

Quoting Cool Paul

we say the "a" in tomato like the "a" in pay

and we say the "a" in pasta like the "a" in pizza....simile all'italiano

Isn't that how everyone pronounces pasta? And I had no idea that router could be pronounced "rooter". I even feel dirty typing that.

The American pronounciation of tomato makes total sense to me. Same as potato right? :) That said, I pronounce it the Australian way now. Been drilled into me.

nah the british say the first "a" in pasta like the "a" in flap or bat. but then they say the second "a" like the "a in pizza.

Ah yes, I have heard that. You wrote "Europeans" - I tend to think of mainland Europeans then, not the British, although both are of course European. And mainland Europeans don't pronounce it that way. At least none that I know. Is this pronounciation true for all British, or just certain dialects? It is weird, I'll give you that. Reminds me of pronouncing Italian "eye-talian"

I've not heard of any British pronouncing it that way, so I think it could be a regional dialect. All pasta-related advertisements and cooking show I've seen on British television say "PAH-sta".

[ Edit: Edited on Dec 23, 2008, at 8:52 PM by Hien ]

28. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3713 posts) 7y

Quoting Hien

I've not heard of any British pronouncing it that way, so I think it could be a regional dialect. All pasta-related advertisements and cooking show I've seen on British television say "PAH-sta".

It is regional - Southern English people pronounce it with the long a but in Northern England, Scotland and Wales it would always be pronounced with a short a as in cap.

29. Posted by gocebe (Inactive 48 posts) 7y

Quoting Cool Paul

Quoting gocebe

I'm non-native speaker who has been living in the States unfortunately i have picked up the habit of saying "How are you?" and walking away. I also hate saying "What's up?" but I always do.

Also I hate the fact that Americans do not pronounce the letter "t" in most words. That's why I can never say Connecticut!

we don't pronounce the letter T? that might be a Connecticut thing

Well Americans pronounce the t but they pronounce it more like a d. Like the t in water.

30. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 7y

Quoting gocebe

Quoting Cool Paul

Quoting gocebe

I'm non-native speaker who has been living in the States unfortunately i have picked up the habit of saying "How are you?" and walking away. I also hate saying "What's up?" but I always do.

Also I hate the fact that Americans do not pronounce the letter "t" in most words. That's why I can never say Connecticut!

we don't pronounce the letter T? that might be a Connecticut thing

Well Americans pronounce the t but they pronounce it more like a d. Like the t in water.

We do pronounce the first "t" in Connecticut but omit the middle "c" so it sounds like "Cun-net-ee-cut. We're very good at being lazy with the poor misunderstood "g" - droppin' it off of almost every word when it ends in "ing". That's one that drives me crazy, especially when those known to be well-spoken do it to sound more like the common man to make a connection. (Sorry, Obama did it throughout his campaign. Maybe it worked - he did win!!)

I haven't picked up certain words or phrases from listening to others but have incorporated some into my speaking/writing because of my chatting with others. I now end e-mails/PMs with "Cheers" and say things like "Mr. X couldn't be arsed to do something and it irritated me". I know I've picked up quite a few little goodies but because I want to remember them, I can't at the moment. They tend to pop into my speech inadvertently.

I'm more likely to slide into someone else's accent before I incorporate new words. A week down south and I start to develop a "twang". Twelve days in Ireland had me sounding very odd. Beerman laughs at me frequently because my Minnesota accent still shows up on a regular basis - think Fargo.