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Can someone just move from the usa and go over seas and work

Travel Forums General Talk Can someone just move from the usa and go over seas and work

1. Posted by chhustek (Budding Member 2 posts) 7y

Hello my name is Chris. I have a couple of questions to ask anyone that maybe interested in helping me. First can someone just move over seas (Europe,Asia,Japan,Greece, etc.) to live and work? Some people say yes some people say no. This is what i'm thinking just so you know what i'm looking for exactly. I'm a 26 year old man. I have worked very hard in life, and a little successfully. The economy in America is way down. My construction company is losing business left and right. I have a couple rentals, truck etc. Not saying i will but if business doesn't pick up i will have to go under. If this happens i would rent my house out then leave. I would like to find myself again, and be happy. right now i'm working about 18 hours a day. construction durng the day, working for Sara Lee Bread Company at night. I'm not going to do this and kill myself in a year. So now what i would like to do is say find a family in say Switzerland that is looking for a hardworking person to help on a farm for free room and board, and food. Maybe stay for 6 months learn new things see new things then maybe move on to another family somewhere in spain or where ever. I would love to go to Switzerland it looks so pretty. I would leave it all behide to try new things, find me again. I don't know if there is a website out there that sets this up or how I could do this. Doesn't have to be a farm say a family that owns any kind of business. Just looking to find happy, loving, full of life people and see the world at the say time. Then when the economy gets better maybe come home not sure. If anyone has a idea on how I could do this please response back and let me know. Thank You Chris

2. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 7y

Hi Chris,

First, I should point out that the situation regarding work will be different for every different country. Each has their own laws and agreements with the US. Sometimes it's possible, sometimes not. I'll give you an idea about the situation in Australia.

I think you really ought to check out WWOOF, a scheme that is all about "Willing Workers on Organic Farms". In a nutshell, you work 4-6 hours per day on an organic farm in exchange for food and lodging. If you have some money of your own to pay for transport, etc.. then this can be a very good and cheap way of experiencing other countries.

I'm not sure what the situation is in other countries, but in Australia, WWOOFing is considered ok even on a tourist visa, making it a very easy option. Since you asked about Switzerland, have a look at this page for more details on how it works there: http://zapfig.com/wwoof/index_en.htm. By the looks of it, not as clear cut.

Now, I should say, I've never actually been WWOOFing, but there are plenty of others on Travellerspoint who have. Just do a site search to find some more blog posts and forum posts about it.

Now, if you want to work for some pay, then you will need a working visa. You are young enough to qualify for the Work and Holiday Visa in Australia (not the same as the "Working Holiday" visa). It will allow 12 months of working in Australia. Usually, people go through an organisation like Bunac to get into Australia on that visa.

Peter
To work for more extended periods, for longer at certain employers, etc.. you will need a working visa. These are much harder to get though, and even harder with the current economic situation. You can get an idea of the idea of the options through this page on the Immigration Departments site: http://www.immi.gov.au/skilled/

3. Posted by Cool Paul (Travel Guru 611 posts) 7y

you can't just get up and go. but being american...we have tons of options. If you have a good amount of experience in construction you can probably get into just about any country in the world except iran or north korea.

but If I'm not mistaken the economy is pretty bad all over the world right now...european countries may be a little more difficult to find work in as they are very developed and populated.

I would recommend going down under they speak english and are still fairly underdeveloped compared to here. plus there is a lot less competition for the jobs. think about it...the population of australia is like 25-30 million! and the country is just as big as america! I know as americans we are allowed to get three 4-month work visas and 1 one-year work visa before the age of 30.

western australia is the first thing that comes to mind. if you have a skilled trade and experience you will probably have no problem at all getting there. I wouldn't be surprised if you found a company willing to help you out in making the move. other places in australia are probably good as well but western australia is still going strong even in this economy. people are making heaps of money out there in construction and mining.

When I was in New Zealand, Auckland was huge for construction jobs. I am not skilled at all and I could find a job as a laborer on a building site within hours. if you are skilled and can prove it you will probably be able to get in there. Keep in mind you probably won't get rich in NZ. look into salaries for what you do. and then take into account the currency exchange rate.

keep in mind while they require to you to have certain qualifications and a certain amount of years experience to get into the country as a skilled migrant there are other ways as well...sometimes if you get a decent job you can have your employer sponser you for a longer work visa.

I would say look into switzerland or any country get that initial visa that will probably last a few months or a year and find a job and decide if you like it, in that time you will probably figure out what you have to do to live there longer.

[ Edit: Edited on 08-Feb-2009, at 16:21 by Cool Paul ]

4. Posted by Cool Paul (Travel Guru 611 posts) 7y

I also agree with Peter, getting a proper work visa in this economy is going to be tough. I was in NZ trying to find a graphic design job, and from there just have them sponsor me after my visa expired. problem is their governments are smart... and require companies are supposed to hire locals over foreigners.

In this economy there are probably quite a few locals out of work applying for the same jobs as foreigners.

but if you are highly skilled that might be all you need.

5. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 7y

Quoting Cool Paul

I would recommend going down under they speak english and are still fairly underdeveloped compared to here. plus there is a lot less competition for the jobs. think about it...the population of australia is like 25-30 million! and the country is just as big as america!.

Paul, I generally agree with your post, but Australia is underdeveloped?!? I'm not sure what you mean by that. Yes, it's a big country with not many people (21 million in fact), but it is still a very developed country. The size of the country is not really relevant when talking about how developed it is in any case. No-one's planning on building cities in the desert.

Construction could be a tough industry to be in here actually - a lot of property developers have put projects on hold due to problems getting finance, nervousness about property prices, etc.. Infrastructure projects meanwhile should get a boost thanks to economic stimulus plans, but I'm not sure if that's the kind of work you would be interested in. And there will be plenty of local workers competing for those jobs also. It's just tough times all round unfortunately.

6. Posted by chhustek (Budding Member 2 posts) 7y

Thank you to everyone that has responsed to my question. Where could I go to get a work visa? I'm very skilled in Construction. I have been a project Superintendent for high rise building 20 storys plus. I have looked for jobs over seas but nothing has came from it. I'm really interested in the WWoof thing. I like that ideal so I could help other working class people in the world. I would need to get a small job somewhere to help pay for stuff. How are the people over there. Are they friendly to americans or are they like alot of americans and hate outsiders?

7. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 7y

Where could I go to get a work visa?

For Australia, I would suggest contacting Bunac or read up the information on the Immigration Department's website (links in first post).

For other countries, you need to find their embassies' websites.

I'm really interested in the WWoof thing. I like that ideal so I could help other working class people in the world. I would need to get a small job somewhere to help pay for stuff. How are the people over there. Are they friendly to americans or are they like alot of americans and hate outsiders?

The kind of people who have registered for a program like Bunac, I think would highly likely be very friendly to foreigners. This is something they are totally used to and aware that they are getting into a situation like that. In Australia's countryside, you will undoubtedly find people who don't fancy foreigners. In the past 8 or so years, US visitors have become somewhat let's say "less respected" than they were before. But that is changing now and I think you'll find most people are quite welcoming. Don't expect highly enthousiastic hospitality though - that is common in the US, but not really normal here. What you will find is that Australians are welcoming, but not excitable. They are on the whole very genuine. It's hard to talk about a whole country of people in blanket terms though. It's a diverse place with lots of different kinds of people. Not everyone is the same.

8. Posted by Cool Paul (Travel Guru 611 posts) 7y

Quoting Peter

Quoting Cool Paul

I would recommend going down under they speak english and are still fairly underdeveloped compared to here. plus there is a lot less competition for the jobs. think about it...the population of australia is like 25-30 million! and the country is just as big as america!.

Paul, I generally agree with your post, but Australia is underdeveloped?!? I'm not sure what you mean by that. Yes, it's a big country with not many people (21 million in fact), but it is still a very developed country. The size of the country is not really relevant when talking about how developed it is in any case. No-one's planning on building cities in the desert.

Construction could be a tough industry to be in here actually - a lot of property developers have put projects on hold due to problems getting finance, nervousness about property prices, etc.. Infrastructure projects meanwhile should get a boost thanks to economic stimulus plans, but I'm not sure if that's the kind of work you would be interested in. And there will be plenty of local workers competing for those jobs also. It's just tough times all round unfortunately.

aw nah mate I didn't mean it like that. I know it's definitely a first world country.

by underdeveloped I meant that they are still building it up. the west coast is still growing. I know perth is a big city but it's going to get a lot bigger. plus there are a few cities on the east coast that have plenty of room for expansion. There is no reason the gold coast won't be as big as miami one day. Lots of people are retiring and moving towards queensland more than ever. I remember not being able to go anywhere in airlie beach or cannonvale without seeing a few construction sites.

Whereas the east coast here is just way over developed.

9. Posted by Peter (Admin 5789 posts) 7y

Quoting Cool Paul

by underdeveloped I meant that they are still building it up. the west coast is still growing. I know perth is a big city but it's going to get a lot bigger. plus there are a few cities on the east coast that have plenty of room for expansion. There is no reason the gold coast won't be as big as miami one day. Lots of people are retiring and moving towards queensland more than ever. I remember not being able to go anywhere in airlie beach or cannonvale without seeing a few construction sites.

Whereas the east coast here is just way over developed.

Ah yes, I suppose you do have a point there. Those areas in particular are high growth. The building projects in the west are largely due to the mining boom that we have experienced over the last decade or so. In Queensland, driven by a property boom. The mining boom in particular has come to a screeching halt recently, so I'm not sure what effect that has had. Towns where mines have closed will have seen massive price drops in housing and I doubt very much any building is going on there right now.

Property development in general has also been heavily hit by problems borrowing money and uncertainties surrounding property prices. I think you'll find both areas considerably less buoyant at the moment.

10. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 7y

I would like to add some info on Europe, since lamost everybody here has talked about Australia.

Europe has to big communities, the EU and the EFTA. Switzerland is in the EFTA.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Free_Trade_Association

Citizens of the EU and the EFTA can work in all the other EU and EFTA countries. EU citizens do not need a work permit to work in other EU countries and in EFTA countries. EU and EFTA citizens get priority over foreigners who are non-EU or non-EFTA citizens, and out of these non-EU citizens who already have a residency permit have priority over those who don't. So are at a double disadvantage - you do not speak the local language and you need to get a work permit and a residency permit.

In general the easiest way to get a work permit in Europe is to graduate from a European university, marry an EU-citizen or have a child which will get an EU passport. A third way is to get sponsored by a company as a skilled migrant worker, but that usually requires a Bachelor degree and 10 years experience. Opening your own company can be a way out.

Why is getting a work permit so hard? Because you need to go through the whole hoopla of immigration procedure. You probably know about illegal immigrants to the USA and their worries, especially about getting a green card - this is what you'll be facing in Europe.

Other people (Canadians, Australians, New Zealanders) can get a working holiday visa to a number of European countries, but the USA has only signed a working holiday agreement with Australia, New Zealand and Canada. You can find more info here:

http://www.anyworkanywhere.com/
http://www.anyworkanywhere.com/whvuscit.html

For this reason WWOOF'ing is IMO the best way for you to see Europe.

Note though that you cannot stay longer than 90 days inside the Schengen area, you'd need a residency permit to stay longer and then the question about your finances would come up. If you want to hang around you need to do it this way: 90 days Schengen, 92 days UK or another non-Schengen country, 90 days Schengen.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Area

This is some general info, if you want to know specifics about moving to Germany (and not Switzerland) for longer than 3 months I can give you more info since I used to work in German immigration. For example citizens of the USA are privileged when it comes to immigration to Germany, they do not have to apply for a residency and work permit in advance, instead they can go through all the paperwork after arrival. This gives US citizen a chance to go to Germany, find a job within 3 months and then try to get a work permit.