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Possible to have more than one citizenship?

Travel Forums North America Possible to have more than one citizenship?

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1. Posted by blade007 (Budding Member 4 posts) 7y

I'm a Canadian citizen and I'd like to know how you get citizenship in the USA? How long does it take? And if I become a citizen in another country, would my Canadian citizenship automatically expire?

2. Posted by Sam I Am (Admin 5588 posts) 7y

This depends on the country. I have both US and Dutch citizenship without problems, so assume the same might be possible with Canada, but if Canadian law doesn't allow it, then there's no way to do it. And of course you'd have to have some way to actually get the American citizenship (ie. parents or some other reason).

3. Posted by blade007 (Budding Member 4 posts) 7y

Quoting Sam I Am

This depends on the country. I have both US and Dutch citizenship without problems, so assume the same might be possible with Canada, but if Canadian law doesn't allow it, then there's no way to do it. And of course you'd have to have some way to actually get the American citizenship (ie. parents or some other reason).

How did u get your US citizenship and how long did it take

4. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 7y

Quoting blade007

Quoting Sam I Am

This depends on the country. I have both US and Dutch citizenship without problems, so assume the same might be possible with Canada, but if Canadian law doesn't allow it, then there's no way to do it. And of course you'd have to have some way to actually get the American citizenship (ie. parents or some other reason).

How did u get your US citizenship and how long did it take

Sam's mother is an American citizen which allows him to have dual citizenship as far as the USCIS is concerned.

Check out these links through the US Citizenship & Immigration Service:

Citizenship

Naturalization

The US does allow dual citizenship depending on the country and circumstances. The US Is (most likely) to grant dual citizenship if you have a family member - parent or grandparent (possibly an aunt or uncle due to marriage) who is a US citizen. About the only other way is to have been born here and your parents Canadian citizens or born of US citizens living in Canada. The US is very strict about dual citizenship for reasons outside of those mentioned above.

I can't comment on how accurate the information is in the following link, but it's probably worth the read time:

Dual Citizenship FAQ: Dual Nationality and United States Law

Hope this helps. Sam will be able to tell you how long the process took for his duality.

5. Posted by Sam I Am (Admin 5588 posts) 7y

As isadora mentioned, my mom is American, so that's what led to it being possible. You're basically an American citizen at birth in that case, although your parents have to go file some paperwork at the American embassy right after you are born I believe (not 100% sure on this). If that hasn't been done, I'm sure it's still possible, but just requires more paperwork. So for me it was relatively straightforward to get a passport. Show birth-certificate and fill in normal papers like any other American. I did this back in the day I still wasn't quite sure where I was going to end up living and this gave me some extra options. I never really did end up using it.

6. Posted by Isadora (Travel Guru 13926 posts) 7y

I forgot to mention two important things...

1) A sure-fire way to dual citizenship would be your profession. Or, at least this profession: Hockey Player (with lots of talent, of course. Or, even just an inkling of talent.) We're not picky - we'll take all of Canuckistan's hockey players if they bring their own skates with them. Not a hockey player? Then maybe "thing #2" will help...

2) Contact the US Consulate in your area and ask. The worst thing they can say is, "We don't want you!" and that's highly unlikely (more like, "D'uh, I don't know..."). They "should" be able to tell you the regulations and requirements for dual citizenship. IF they can't help - contact the US Citizenship and Immigration Service. They only take comments about their website via the e-mail address but their phone number is: 1-800-375-5283.

[ Edit: Edited on 02-Mar-2009, at 12:21 by Isadora ]

7. Posted by blade007 (Budding Member 4 posts) 7y

If you have a passport, how long can you stay in the USA? I'm looking to get a job there temporarily

8. Posted by Sam I Am (Admin 5588 posts) 7y

Quoting blade007

If you have a passport, how long can you stay in the USA? I'm looking to get a job there temporarily

Assuming you mean American passport, indefinitely. If you mean Canadian, then I'm not really sure.

9. Posted by Cool Paul (Travel Guru 611 posts) 7y

Look into it. The US and Canada are two nations founded by immigrants! The US definitely allows it...I missed being a us/german citizen by a couple years. Turns out all I had to do was to get my dad to fill out some paperwork before I turned 23...I didn't find out until I was 26 though. I also know other people that are US/irish and US/italian.

it helps if you have family/spouse and/or a good skill, trade or profession.

10. Posted by Calcruzer (Moderator 1989 posts) 7y

Most American tourist visas (if you have a passport from a country besides the US) is normally good for a maximum of 90 days. It does extend usually for 30 days if you leave the country and then return.

P.S. Prior to marrying my first wife (a Brazilian), we used to travel to Mexico each month so her visa would reset). Nowadays the rules are stricter on this, so don't expect things to be quite so easy as they were back prior to 2001.

Enjoy