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selling your photos

Travel Forums Travel Photography selling your photos

1. Posted by marlis (Travel Guru 1167 posts) 7y

can I get some help please?

I was asked from a tourist office in USA if they may use some of my photos to promote the Island Bonaire where I live.
they would use the photos at the internet and/or for printed ads.
(this is what I know till now,not really clear)
first I was offered credit to my photos,no payment.
I let them know that I dont let them use my photos for free,now they ask me about the prices.
here my problem starts.
has somebody of you sold his photos?
where can I find infos about this?

2. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4811 posts) 7y

There's a couple of places where you can find what professional stock photographers charge:
stock photo price calculator
editorial estimator (advertising and editorial stock photo usage have rather different rates, so this one isn't really relevant for this particular request, but I thought I'd put it in so you can compare)
Seth Resnick Image use fees

Easiest is probably to go to alamy.com, search for an image of similar quality there, and then use their price calculator with the exact parameters for the request from this tourist office.

An agency like Alamy takes a percentage of 50%, the rest goes to the photographer. You can take that into account and charge a lower rate than at the above sites, but on the other hand, you're probably spending a lot of time researching this, maybe some time getting the photo ready for sending, etc, and all that is time you should be paid for, too.

What you'll notice with all of the above sites is that the exact usage of the photo (as well as its distribution) has a massive effect on the licensing rates. You'll either want this tourist office to specify this much more clearly than "internet and/or printed ads", or just quote them some prices for those two uses separately.
You're licensing your photo to be used for a more-or-less strictly defined purpose for a limited amount of time. There's far too frequent requests for "all rights", but that's really never what is wanted, and if it is, they should expect to pay a lot of money for it. (The magic phrase to include is "additional usage needs to be negotiated separately".)

I'd give this tourist agency a 95% chance of not letting hear from themselves again after you've quoted prices. Their initial "we'll give you full credit" line makes them sound like the typical "flickr raider"; they'll complain about not having any budget, will want to make you believe you should be honored to be chosen and that a credit is totally just compensation, etc. What you should remember is that they came to you. They want your photo, and they believe that this photo is good enough to really enhance their image (especially if they want to use it in printed ads) and so will help make them a lot of money. This makes the photo valuable.

3. Posted by marlis (Travel Guru 1167 posts) 7y

BIG THANK YOU Sander!!!
very good infos for me:)

Now I will see if they are still interested to use my photos.I will sure ask them specific
questions before I give them price infos.
I knew about price differences for prints in magazins (front,half or double page...)but had no clue about ads at the internet.

thanks again Sander

4. Posted by soupatrvlr (Respected Member 385 posts) 7y

Marlis, a site I often use in my graphic design business is istock. These are royalty free stock photos/music/videos. This site is a good indicator of what royalty free images sell for. A lot of these images come from flickr, and istock has an agreement with Getty, so a lot of these photographers are aiming to get in them. The quality is exceptionally high for the low cost. You should be able to find comparable images here. I will warn you though, these shots are very cheap. When I've been approached to use my photography for "free" with a link back to my name...the whole budget thing Sander was talking about...I refer them to this site, b/c it is so affordable. Web images run about $3/image.

5. Posted by marlis (Travel Guru 1167 posts) 7y

Marlis, a site I often use in my graphic design business is istock. These are royalty free stock photos/music/videos. This site is a good indicator of what royalty free images sell for. A lot of these images come from flickr, and istock has an agreement with Getty, so a lot of these photographers are aiming to get in them. The quality is exceptionally high for the low cost. You should be able to find comparable images here. I will warn you though, these shots are very cheap. When I've been approached to use my photography for "free" with a link back to my name...the whole budget thing Sander was talking about...I refer them to this site, b/c it is so affordable. Web images run about $3/image.

thank you so much ,
but I found this site confusing,could not figure out how much somebody has to pay for a image.
the site stock price calculater is easy and clear.
sure thing is,I dont sell for $ 3 one of my photos and let it use for thousends of prints
and internet.

6. Posted by s96024 (Full Member 106 posts) 7y

There is a lot of very good photographers selling their work very cheap, to get noticed. So unless you are absolutely exceptional or have something very rare and hard to get hold of, your not going to be able to charge much.

7. Posted by soupatrvlr (Respected Member 385 posts) 7y

Quoting Marlis

I found this site confusing,could not figure out how much somebody has to pay for a image.

Yeah, its a little confusing at first. Basically you buy a certain amount of credits, the minimum being 12 credits for $18. Then you purchase the image based on the size you need it for: print or web. Most web images require only an extra small (1 credit) or small size (3 credits)...so only a couple bucks when you get down to it. Each image tells you the maximum usage and whether you need to buy it for a small press run or purchase the larger press run package. Hope that helps. :)