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Where do i start??

Travel Forums North America Where do i start??

1. Posted by home girl (Budding Member 6 posts) 12y

home girl has indicated that this thread is about USA

Hi guys,

Im planning to travel around NorthAmerica next year from May thru July but i dont really know how to go about getting started! Ive checked out Amtrack etc coz i think il probably travel by train while im there but not sure how i go about planning my trip!

Its my first time travelling and il be going alone.

Any help &/or advice would be very welcome!

Thanks

2. Posted by GregW (Travel Guru 2635 posts) 12y

I would suggest reading a lot about North America to figure out what things you want to see. Do you want to see the cities - big city shopping and operas and broadway? Are you more interested in small-town American life? Maybe it's the national parks with soaring mountains, raging rivers and towering pine trees? Maybe it's all three?

So, try and figure out what your key "can't miss" things are, and then you should be able to start to string together a plan to see those things.

3. Posted by home girl (Budding Member 6 posts) 12y

Thanks Greg, i'l do that. yeh id like to see the big cities but i also really want to see the small town American life too. Desperate to see those Redwoods, thats what started my interest in travelling over to America in the first place! :-)

Thanks again, il look into and read up on all the places so i can see what i want to do :-)

4. Posted by Jessicaca (Budding Member 11 posts) 12y

Keep in mind that traveling by train in the US is NOTHING like traveling by train anywhere else. Especially on the west coast where there is a huge public transportation problem. Be sure to note where the trains actually stop as it may add to your travel time. If you can afford it, I would definately recommend renting a car (if you're going to be on the West Coast). East Coast trains/subways however are great for getting around, so if you're set on traveling in that manner, you may want to stick around that section of the country.

5. Posted by Musze (Inactive 20 posts) 12y

If you come up to Canada, make sure you take a train through the mountains - it's amazing. Even taking a Greyhound bus through them is great! I didn't think there was a tranportation problem on the west coast?? For Vancouver, there's a great public transit system, and outside of the cities, greyhound buses serve pretty much every city and town.

6. Posted by Musze (Inactive 20 posts) 12y

If you come up to Canada, make sure you take a train through the mountains - it's amazing. Even taking a Greyhound bus through them is great! I didn't think there was a tranportation problem on the west coast?? For Vancouver, there's a great public transit system, and outside of the cities, greyhound buses serve pretty much every city and town.

7. Posted by Musze (Inactive 20 posts) 12y

Sorry for the double post!

8. Posted by friscokid (Full Member 122 posts) 12y

home girl you can start on finding out if you can use your UK drivers license in the USA. If so, go to enterprise, dollar, or some other car rental agency.

Do your trip on the west coast as you have an interest for redwoods. With a car you can also visit other remote areas of California like Yosemite, Lake Tahoe, as well as cities like San Francisco, Berkeley, and small North California towns like Napa, Sonoma, Calistoga which have vineyards, spas, small town main streets.

With a car you can do a nice NoCal trip in 2 weeks. Nevada and Southern California is close enough to drive if you will be staying longer.

peace

9. Posted by Calcruzer (Moderator 1992 posts) 12y

aj415 has it exactly right.

The redwoods are located in the Coastal range and in the Sierra Nevada range of California between Big Sur (just south of Monterey, California) to the Oregon state line. The major places to see the most impressive redwoods are in Big Basin State Park, Redwoods National Park, Sequoia National Park, and Yosemite National Park. You need to understand that this spans an area stretching over 200 miles north to south (obviously not all forest). The forest stops, then starts again, then stops, and so on.

And the redwoods are not just in national parks--they grow wild and so are located on private property as well. I'm fortunate to say that I own a home on land with over 50 redwood trees (and 80 other trees) located just north of the beach at Santa Cruz. (Monterey Bay)

But the most impressive redwoods are in a small area in Sequoia National Park (middle, eastern part of the state) , and the "Trees of Mystery" in the far northern part of the state. Also, close to me is Big Basin State Park--the oldest redwood park in the country. They have hollowed out redwoods big enough to put a picnic table into. There's also a place real close by called Roaring Camp (in Felton). They have built an "old western" town, and they have old steam trains you can ride that go from there, through the redwoods, and down to the beach at Santa Cruz (to the boardwalk where they have roller coasters and such) and then back. I think they only do this from May to October, though.

Still, most people consider Yosemite to be the most scenic spot in the state--although, personally, I think that honor should go to San Francisco and its bay. You'll have to decide for yourself.

Anyway, this could be a start for your trip through the rest of the country. There's lots and lots to see. The United States of America is a scenic and dynamic place.

Enjoy