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Travel from Germany to Spain

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1. Posted by jm2009 (Budding Member 5 posts) 7y

Hi,

I'm living and working in Germany, and I wonder if I need to apply for SNG. Visa to Visit Spain, or I can just go there from Germany without need for Visa.

2. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 7y

Whether you're currently residing elsewhere in the EU is not important: are you an EU citizen? If so, you don't need a visa to enter other EU (Schengen) countries.

If you're not, you'll need a visa of some kind or other. I don't know what you mean by an SNG visa, but please post back with nationality, purpose of visit for Spain, and intended duration of stay.

[ Edit: Edited on 02-Jun-2009, at 03:05 by bentivogli ]

3. Posted by jm2009 (Budding Member 5 posts) 7y

Hi,

I'm from Algeria, and living and working in Germany, if I take the train from Germany to Spain, do I need a Schengen Visa to enter Spain? Since Germany is within Schengen Area.

4. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 7y

You most probably need a short-stay Schengen visa to visit another Schengen country. In all likelihood, the visa that you currently reside in Germany on cannot be used for travel to other Schengen countries.

Best consult the Spanish consulate nearest to your current home. Addresses can be found here.

A last word of advice: even though border checks have been abolished in the Schengen area, you are still required to comply with visa requirements. If you were to decide to travel to Spain illegally, this could have grave repercussions for your status in Germany if you were caught.

[ Edit: Edited on 02-Jun-2009, at 05:32 by bentivogli ]

5. Posted by jm2009 (Budding Member 5 posts) 7y

Hi bentivogli,

Thanks for the reply.

But this is wrong. I just checked it now.

Anyone have a long term resident in any Schengen country, that equal to Schengen Visa.

in this case, all I need is my resedint card in Germany and I can visit any Schengen country and stay up to 90 days.

6. Posted by jm2009 (Budding Member 5 posts) 7y

I just checked and confirmed now,

Anyone who has a permit resident in any Schengen country, deos not need Schengen Visa.

bentivogli, Please check before replying to posts like this, since it can keep people from traveling, you better say that you don't know

>>Whether you're currently residing elsewhere in the EU is not important

This is again totally wrong, if you have a long term resident in any Schengen country, you can travel freelly within the Schengen area for up to 90 days, with your permit resident and passport.

7. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 7y

You try, then, but at your own risk. I am pretty confident I know what I am talking about, thank you very much.

8. Posted by jm2009 (Budding Member 5 posts) 7y

No argument with this link:

http://www.delind.ec.europa.eu/en/features/schengen_visa.htm

Again, please, this is very important, make sure you give the correct advice, other wise people will be mislead.

9. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 7y

The link you provided seems to be dead? Also, I'd be interested to know what part of my answer is wrong according to the information you found. I did some digging myself this afternoon following your critique, and I couldn't find anything at all that contradicts what I have said: since long-stay visa are issued nationally, you need an additional visa in order to be able to travel around the Schengen area.

10. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 7y

jm2009, could you pretty please tell the exact title of your residency permit? Aufenthaltserlaubnis or Niederlassungserlaubsnis and which paragraph?

Bentivogli is both right and wrong. Usually people who hold residency permits in one Schengen state can travel freely to other Schengen states. (So if you got Aufenthaltserlaubnis because you are a student or because you are married to a German you can go to Spain.) But there are also other foreigners who live and work legally in Germany who are not even allowed to leave the Bundesland or the Landkreis they live in in Germany.