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What qualifies one as a "World Traveller"?

Travel Forums General Talk What qualifies one as a "World Traveller"?

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71. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 7y

Quoting Ladymacwil

So....somehow, being able to pronounce beer, in several languauges, makes you a 'WORLD TRAVELLER?"

Oh come on, I was just being light-hearted. Is not something you can actually define anyway!

72. Posted by Utrecht (Moderator 5595 posts) 7y

Quoting samsara2

Quoting Ladymacwil

So....somehow, being able to pronounce beer, in several languauges, makes you a 'WORLD TRAVELLER?"

Oh come on, I was just being light-hearted. Is not something you can actually define anyway!

What, so it's not true. All that time I spend last weeks...thrown away for nothing!

73. Posted by Ladymacwil (Full Member 170 posts) 7y

Don't get me wrong...I love when one can pronounce beer and/or wine in any language!

I was just playing Devil's Advocate here... Forget the level four rapids, (When my sister is applying her lipstick, knowing a Photo Op is coming up...) I just think it's more interesting to hear WHAT you did and WHERE... Than, "Iv'e travelled in at least 11 zones.." (Which you could do in any visit to Hawaii, for example...)
"Iv'e been to DisneyWorld and to Hawaii..." (I MUST be a "World Traveller!")

Anyone getting yet, that the facts and figures, are not nearly as interesting as the true "experience?" Of any traveller?

74. Posted by CWai (Budding Member 4 posts) 7y

[quote]bwiiian It's part of Australia. End of story.

New Zealand is NOT part of Australia

Post 75 was removed by a moderator
76. Posted by bwiiian (Travel Guru 768 posts) 7y

Quoting CWai

[quote]bwiiian It's part of Australia. End of story.

New Zealand is NOT part of Australia

There are no actual hard and fast rules about what continents are and who is in what one, but it is generally accepted that New Zealand, although not part of the geological continent that the island of Australia is on, is in fact a part of the political continent of Australia.

77. Posted by Utrecht (Moderator 5595 posts) 7y

Quoting bwiiian

Quoting CWai

[quote]bwiiian It's part of Australia. End of story.

New Zealand is NOT part of Australia

There are no actual hard and fast rules about what continents are and who is in what one, but it is generally accepted that New Zealand, although not part of the geological continent that the island of Australia is on, is in fact a part of the political continent of Australia.

yep...but called Oceania;)

78. Posted by Redpaddy (Inactive 1004 posts) 7y

I'm not going to give my own answer here as to which continent, it's too messy.
However, Encyclopedia Britannica states it's part of Australia, Reader's Digest quotes it as being in Oceana and Phillip's World Atlas has it down as being part of Australasia.
Yep - it's messy

79. Posted by Gilly09 (Budding Member 37 posts) 7y

Quoting Ladymacwil

Oh, guess I should have said highest elevation of a State Capitol in the US, (And if you get this w/o looking it up I'd be gobsmacked!)

BTW, "traveller" I think, is very different from "tourist". For example, you could visit 18 countries in 9 days on some tour... (but does that really constitute being a "World Traveller?") To me travelling means really visiting a country and it's culture, experiencing it fully, ride mass transit, go to the local pubs, etc.

Photographer I once worked for is on 78 countries, (My "mentor"!) Has ridden camels, been in African huts of Chieftans, crossed into Russia in the 1960s, (Whoa!) Anyway, his best photos are always of the people, not the landmarks, but the populice, especially, the children.

I agree - traveller and tourist = very different experiences!

a pilot for example - tourist - not especially, traveller - deffo not!!!

80. Posted by Redpaddy (Inactive 1004 posts) 7y

Quoting Ladymacwil

Don't get me wrong...I love when one can pronounce beer and/or wine in any language!


I pride myself when abroad that I can say a few words in the native language. Even in places like Iceland and Tangiers, I am able to say please and thanks.
As for the word beer.... It's one of my favourites to learn straight away.
I can say please and thank you and a large beer please in about 40 different languages. Not much I know, but better than listening to annoying Brits shouting thank you in English to some poor Albanian waiter that hasn't got a clue what they're on about.