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A game for the polyglots

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11. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 7y

My sister tells the story of her first job interview in New Zealand, where she told the interviewer at the end "I hope you're rooting for me!". He was kind enough to explain that one so she wouldn't be caught saying it again.

The first time I met my mother-in-law, in Belfast, I told her that Neal was in desperate need of new pants. I never heard him yell "trousers!" so loud in my life.

Even the English language has some doozies!

12. Posted by Utrecht (Moderator 5596 posts) 7y

Quoting tway

In French, a seal is called a "phoque." Just guess how that's pronounced!

I know I know...but I am to shy to tell

13. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 7y

Quoting tway

My sister tells the story of her first job interview in New Zealand, where she told the interviewer at the end "I hope you're rooting for me!". He was kind enough to explain that one so she wouldn't be caught saying it again.

The first time I met my mother-in-law, in Belfast, I told her that Neal was in desperate need of new pants. I never heard him yell "trousers!" so loud in my life.

Even the English language has some doozies!

Ok, I get the "roots". All my ozzie friends MUST MUST visit the Roots store when they come to Toronto. But what's the "pants" one ?

To add to the thread, I know that the "V" for victory finger sign is an insult when done palm inwards in certain countries.

14. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 7y

Quoting tway

My sister tells the story of her first job interview in New Zealand, where she told the interviewer at the end "I hope you're rooting for me!". He was kind enough to explain that one so she wouldn't be caught saying it again.

The first time I met my mother-in-law, in Belfast, I told her that Neal was in desperate need of new pants. I never heard him yell "trousers!" so loud in my life.

Even the English language has some doozies!

15. Posted by Q' (Travel Guru 1987 posts) 7y

Quoting samsara2

Quoting tway

My sister tells the story of her first job interview in New Zealand, where she told the interviewer at the end "I hope you're rooting for me!". He was kind enough to explain that one so she wouldn't be caught saying it again.

The first time I met my mother-in-law, in Belfast, I told her that Neal was in desperate need of new pants. I never heard him yell "trousers!" so loud in my life.

Even the English language has some doozies!

Ok, somebody had better start explaining this one to me !!!

16. Posted by samsara_ (Travel Guru 5353 posts) 7y

I'm going to let Tina explain

17. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 7y

Quoting Q'

Quoting samsara2

Quoting tway

My sister tells the story of her first job interview in New Zealand, where she told the interviewer at the end "I hope you're rooting for me!". He was kind enough to explain that one so she wouldn't be caught saying it again.

The first time I met my mother-in-law, in Belfast, I told her that Neal was in desperate need of new pants. I never heard him yell "trousers!" so loud in my life.

Even the English language has some doozies!

Ok, somebody had better start explaining this one to me !!!

Hee hee! "Root" means to do the nasty and "pants" are underwear. ;)

18. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 7y

Hm. In the ozzie-english british-english department, I once had a shock on hearing a travelling companion shout 'oh, I can't get all the sand out of my thong'.

19. Posted by Ofelia (Respected Member 142 posts) 7y

Quoting magykal1

Hm. In the ozzie-english british-english department, I once had a shock on hearing a travelling companion shout 'oh, I can't get all the sand out of my thong'.

Hee hee- a similar thing- my aussie flatmate and I walked to a tube station in London, she stumbled and stepped into a big puddle. We were just at the entrance when she screamed, "God, my thong is so wet!". It was a bit of a treat to all the early-morning grey-suited commuters!

20. Posted by Redpaddy (Inactive 1004 posts) 7y

Strand - in English, can also mean a street or promenade.
Stranded can mean it's of strands - or lost without assistance.
How about.... Hey dear, that deer is dear. The boy hung on to the buoy. The girl with fair hair, sold good fayre once we'd paid our fare to get to the fair. The hare has brown hair. I hit the ball with my bat and it hit a bat.
Glad it's my native (of sorts) language.