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Hostels - what do they include

Travel Forums Australia / New Zealand & The Pacific Hostels - what do they include

1. Posted by Goska268 (Inactive 53 posts) 7y

I'm new to the whole hosteling experience. Can anyone tell me what the cost of staying in a hostel includes? Do you get food with that, towels for washing up, beverages, etc?

2. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4834 posts) 7y

You get a bed with linen (which you frequently have to put on the bed yourself) and use of the available facilities (shared bathroom, a shared fully equipped kitchen, washing machine/dryer (usually against an additional charge of $4-5), lounge, tv room, book exchange, storage lockers, etc). The really nice hostels have things like free tea and coffee, but this is rare. A towel is sometimes included with the linen, but not usually (although they're almost always available for a $1-2 additional charge).
Most hostels organize activities for the people staying there against a nominal charge, like a weekly barbecue, pancake breakfasts, city orientation tours, pub crawls (in so-called "party hostels"), etc. Hostels in big cities frequently have a job board, and a hostel's reception is generally really helpful with informing you what's there to do in a place, being able to book you on tours, and generally being the first point of contact for anything you're uncertain about.
You can pay extra at most hostels for a private room, and at about half the hostels for an "en suite" (e.g. not shared) bathroom.

(Note that this answer is specific for hostels in Australia/New Zealand. Details differ in other places. For example, in Europe it's rather rare to find a kitchen for guest use, although this is usually offset by breakfast being served.)

[ Edit: Edited on 23-Jul-2009, at 14:15 by Sander ]

3. Posted by weaponheat (Budding Member 2 posts) 7y

All hostels are providing similar things,

you can get the double room or dorm room which is cheaper. In some hostels there are lots of promotions on food and drinks so one of them could be the one that are you looking for....free drink:). Hostels have shared kitchen where you can cook but do not give you a food for free. Some of them might have a little bar that cook food but its not free.

Good luck with finding a good one:):)

4. Posted by Goska268 (Inactive 53 posts) 7y

thanks for the info guys! i was going to go alone to Sydney and at first i was going to dorm but then i thought about just getting a single room, i know some of them have that option on their website. I know i would probably be better off going the dorm route since i'll be alone and this would allow me to meet some people, but i guess i'm just hesitant since you never know what type of roomate you will get. What do you guys think is the better option for my stay?

Also, i noticed that some of the hostels, like Bondi Beachouse, doesn't allow you to book for more than 6 nights. Does anyone know why they do that. What if you want to stay longer - will you most likely be able to prolong your stay once you are there in the hostel?

5. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4834 posts) 7y

Quoting Goska268

thanks for the info guys! i was going to go alone to Sydney and at first i was going to dorm but then i thought about just getting a single room, i know some of them have that option on their website. I know i would probably be better off going the dorm route since i'll be alone and this would allow me to meet some people, but i guess i'm just hesitant since you never know what type of roomate you will get. What do you guys think is the better option for my stay?

Personally I always opt for single rooms nowadays (ever since I've been able to afford it), as I'm figuring I still meet plenty of people in the hostel's lounge and kitchen, and have heard enough snoring to last me a lifetime. I'm not the most social person, though, and frequently prefer to just be by myself as well. If you really want to have the highest chance of getting to know people, then there's a valid school of thought which says that the larger the dorm, the better.

Also, i noticed that some of the hostels, like Bondi Beachouse, doesn't allow you to book for more than 6 nights. Does anyone know why they do that. What if you want to stay longer - will you most likely be able to prolong your stay once you are there in the hostel?

There's quite a few hostels (many YHAs especially) which have maximum stay limits of a week, since they want to cater to travellers, not to people looking for semi-permanent accommodation (there's other hostels which are the other way 'round, and try to cater to long-term stayers with special weekly or even monthly rates). It's frequently up to the digression of individual managers if they'll allow you to stay longer (unless it's a really busy period, they mostly do, especially if you pay for the extra nights in time and don't make too much of a mess), but by having a maximum stay policy, they have the option of getting rid of undesirables relatively easily.

6. Posted by m1ket (Budding Member 17 posts) 7y

Theres noting worse than going to dorm rooms where people have been there a month or two and their clothes are everywhere etc etc... so a max stay is a good thing for most people who are actually travelling

Post 7 was removed by a moderator