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One million identical photos

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21. Posted by eroltoksoy (Full Member 173 posts) 7y

Quoting adagio

I'm just home from my summer holiday where I was reminded of one thing that kind of annoys me a bit when going to popular turist attractions. Several times in the last couple of weeks I've had people wave me away so they could get that perfect holiday shot - after all what would a holiday be if you couldn't brag about it to your family and friends with perfect pictures. There is no politeness just a "you're standing in my way"-attitude. Actually these people seem a bit stressed.

I used to take a lot of pictures when away on holiday but after having accumulated several thousand on an RTW a few years back I gave it up as I've never really looked at them since. Just carrying around a camera gives me the feeling that I need to document all the things I see and subtracts from the experience of being there.

So I don't use the camera much anymore. If I want to show people where I've been I google an image and if I want to show them someone I met I use Facebook.

Of course some people use photography as an art form and as the whole purpose of travelling but they are in the minority. It seems to me most people are just taking the same pictures thousands of people have taken before them.

How do you use your camera?

you have an interesting point of view.

for me digicams killed the art of photography in all domestic and amateur ways. snowadays everyone goes somewhere takes 100 pics and then some of this photos stay for a long time in camera and then some are uploaded in facebook or computers. and stay there forever. nobody sees them.nobody talks about them. no converstation, no interaction, no sharing, no production. it isjust a bit of time wasting and carbon relesase.

I dont know man I am confused. I still want to take photos of my next trip but I dont know what will I do with them when I come back.

22. Posted by Sander (Moderator 4835 posts) 7y

Quoting eroltoksoy

for me digicams killed the art of photography in all domestic and amateur ways. snowadays everyone goes somewhere takes 100 pics and then some of this photos stay for a long time in camera and then some are uploaded in facebook or computers. and stay there forever. nobody sees them.

So that's a curious point of view.
I remember distinctly when taking photos on film that they stayed forever on a roll (since you always had a few shots left on that), and then you finally printed them, some would go in a photo album, but most went in a shoe box, and nobody ever saw them other than perhaps a few family members who'd look through the photo album when they visited.

Now, I publish my photos to my website. There's currently roughly 2900 photos on there. In the last 31 days, those photos have been looked at 62143 times by 25291 unique visitors (~21500 of whom came to me through google). That's people who clicked through to the full photo pages, not views of the images on my weblog or google images or anywhere else thumbnails get published. And yes, I filtered out bots (at least the big ones; there's probably 1-2% bot activity remaining which I'm still counting).
Okay, maybe not an entirely meaningful number, since this includes the views of two photos which happen to rank on the first page of google images for some popular search terms and so draw insane amounts of traffic. If I filter out those two images, I get 34573 views of full photo pages by 8150 unique visitors (~5000 of whom came to me through google).

I think that's more reach than I'd have gotten hanging my photos in a well known gallery. And this is keeping up every single month (although I don't know if it's lower or higher than usual at the moment because of summer holidays). And sure, these photos don't get paid nearly as much attention by the visitors as they would have hanging in a gallery (and 99%+ isn't good enough to hang in a gallery anyway), but it also requires near zero effort on my part to publish, and getting all these strangers looking at my photos isn't my primary goal - just a nice side benefit.

I think you seriously underestimate how many people like looking at photos online. I get more traffic from google images than from regular google. And Flickr isn't as big as it is for no reason, y'know... :)

Over the years I've built up quite a backlog of photos which I still have to publish online. And not a month goes by without friends or family members gently berating me for not yet publishing a particular set of photos they're really looking forward to. Every year, more and more people who know me (who'd never have looked through a photo album), ranging from good friends to vague acquaintances, are telling me how much they've liked looking at my photos. They can do it in their own time, when it's convenient for them, and only looking at subjects which interest them. And they are doing so. Completely of their own free will. Because they want to.


All of this not to say that I think that quantity of people looking at photos is an important metric, nor that this is what should decide you to take photos. But saying that people have stopped looking at photos because of digital publishing is completely opposite to reality. :)

[ Edit: Edited on 13-Aug-2009, at 02:18 by Sander ]

23. Posted by eroltoksoy (Full Member 173 posts) 7y

Quoting Sander

Quoting eroltoksoy

for me digicams killed the art of photography in all domestic and amateur ways. snowadays everyone goes somewhere takes 100 pics and then some of this photos stay for a long time in camera and then some are uploaded in facebook or computers. and stay there forever. nobody sees them.

So that's a curious point of view.
I remember distinctly when taking photos on film that they stayed forever on a roll (since you always had a few shots left on that), and then you finally printed them, some would go in a photo album, but most went in a shoe box, and nobody ever saw them other than perhaps a few family members who'd look through the photo album when they visited.

Now, I publish my photos to my website. There's currently roughly 2900 photos on there. In the last 31 days, those photos have been looked at 62143 times by 25291 unique visitors (~21500 of whom came to me through google). That's people who clicked through to the full photo pages, not views of the images on my weblog or google images or anywhere else thumbnails get published. And yes, I filtered out bots (at least the big ones; there's probably 1-2% bot activity remaining which I'm still counting).
Okay, maybe not an entirely meaningful number, since this includes the views of two photos which happen to rank on the first page of google images for some popular search terms and so draw insane amounts of traffic. If I filter out those two images, I get 34573 views of full photo pages by 8150 unique visitors (~5000 of whom came to me through google).

I think that's more reach than I'd have gotten hanging my photos in a well known gallery. And this is keeping up every single month (although I don't know if it's lower or higher than usual at the moment because of summer holidays). And sure, these photos don't get paid nearly as much attention by the visitors as they would have hanging in a gallery (and 99%+ isn't good enough to hang in a gallery anyway), but it also requires near zero effort on my part to publish, and getting all these strangers looking at my photos isn't my primary goal - just a nice side benefit.

I think you seriously underestimate how many people like looking at photos online. I get more traffic from google images than from regular google. And Flickr isn't as big as it is for no reason, y'know... :)

Over the years I've built up quite a backlog of photos which I still have to publish online. And not a month goes by without friends or family members gently berating me for not yet publishing a particular set of photos they're really looking forward to. Every year, more and more people who know me (who'd never have looked through a photo album), ranging from good friends to vague acquaintances, are telling me how much they've liked looking at my photos. They can do it in their own time, when it's convenient for them, and only looking at subjects which interest them. And they are doing so. Completely of their own free will. Because they want to.


All of this not to say that I think that quantity of people looking at photos is an important metric, nor that this is what should decide you to take photos. But saying that people have stopped looking at photos because of digital publishing is completely opposite to reality. :)

I see your point there. But you are telling ther advantages about after publishing them on web . It is something totally different from old traditional photo taking.

Lets say if you are an independent photgrapher who practice photo taking as a professional or in a more ambitious way surely digital photos and web pakes makes things easier for you to reach more audiences.

But photo taking as I mentioned is sth else. It is only about taking pictures, print them and show to some friends or family thats all.

24. Posted by laurim (Respected Member 260 posts) 7y

For me, picture-taking is kind of a burden and a distraction to enjoying the moment. The situation usually is "wow that's cool. guess I should dig my camera out and take a picture of it". I've found that the pictures I like the most after I get home are the people pictures (although I'm still inhibited about taking people pictures). Monuments and scenery never look the same in pictures but seeing people you've met alone the way brings up all sorts of great memories.

25. Posted by RachelChai (Budding Member 5 posts) 7y

I actually find that photography allows me to appreciate even more what I’m seeing surrounding me because it allows me to stop where I am situated and think and stare at the space for several moments. As a college student who is studying photography, I don’t just stand there and snap a shot. I stand at the spot for several seconds and think about how the space means to me. As I’m thinking, I think about how I exactly want to shoot the photos, which includes where do I exactly want to shoot and what composition. On top of that, since I use an SLR camera, I also have to think about the technical aspects such as the aperture, shutter speed, and ISO. When I think about the technical aspect, I have to think about if I want the background to be blurry or sharp and if I want to see blurred motion or frozen motion. So, all of these decisions play an important role to what message am I trying to tell the viewers. So, since I'm spending critical amount of time taking photographs, it allows me to take the time to appreciate the surroundings and also capture unique styles that could be different the typical touristy shots.

Then, when I come home and see the pictures, I always feel as if I’m reliving through the memories. I can definitely say that I’m always going through my blog archives just to pretend that I’m living through the moment again as I feel that I can step inside the picture. In fact, sometimes I never realize how wondrous many of the places are until I see the pictures!

Another thing – Photography allows me to meet new people because I absolutely love doing documentary photography. So, when I photograph people, not only I take a snapshot of them, but also, I always try to communicate with them to learn more about their life and culture, and of course, if the country is speaking a foreign language, it gives me the opportunity to practice speaking in its language! I always think of my camera as a tool to broaden my vision of the world surrounding me.

Another food for thought – because one of my main goals as a travel photographer is to capture the culture and the lifestyle of the locals, I need to venture beyond the tourist spots and visit the places where the locals live. So, photography is giving me a way to motivate me to venture the off beat tracks.

So, I find photography as a tool to broaden my horizons of my travel experiences.

26. Posted by madpoet (Respected Member 413 posts) 7y

Taking pictures of famous landmarks IS pointless. But taking pictures of people you met along the way, or some interesting little place that few people know about- that's why I bring a camera. So I can look back at it, years later, and say: "Oh, yeah: I remember that night..."

27. Posted by sherylnyc (First Time Poster 1 posts) 7y

I like seeing the change that has taken place in my picture taking. At first I snapped away; now I include people and look for their interaction in the enviroment. No more just standing in front of the object.

28. Posted by sacmike03 (Budding Member 60 posts) 7y

This reminds me of taking a picture of the eiffel tower, Angkor wat, the reclining buddah, the statue of liberty, or the sydney operah house. Yes, you can find better pictures on line. And maybe no one wants to see them. However, looking at the pictures i took of these places brings back specific memories and feelings from when i was there and who i was there with. Plus, its the picture i took and maybe i just like it. You wouldnt avoid travelling to places just because you can see what it looks like online. Yes, i do get tired of having to get my camera out...but i never regret having the pictures i take. If i dont want then i can delete them....but i cant just go back to Cambodia to get another picture of a temple that i missed.

29. Posted by Rhombus (Travel Guru 64 posts) 7y

I like to let the scene dictate my response. I'm a pretty avid photographer, though I've gotten a lot better about my subject choices. If a scene "pops" for me, I'll get out the camera and compose a few shots. If I don't like the composition, or lighting etc. I don't waste my time, and put it away. Too many people don't edit there photos enough when they show them to others or post them to fb. You'll see 10 shots of the same scene, slightly adjusted, and often enough, it's a boring shot anyway.

There are also other ways to capture a scene, if you have the time. If a scene is really moving, sometimes I'll describe it in my journal, or take a picture, or sketch it in charcoal in my sketch book, or simply remember it and describe it in a story. Or use a combonation of things.

"A picture says a thousand words.." Just make sure it's a good picture.

30. Posted by dnicholson (Full Member 146 posts) 7y

Well, I belong to the group some photos are fine... a picture or two at a location or a specific spot is alright with me. I enjoy browsing different pictures that I or my friends or relatives has been but I don't really like posing that much. I would rather enjoy the view as it is or just relax while everyone is out there taking pictures. Some of which they throw or delete anyways...