Skip Navigation

Over-exposed sky

Travel Forums Travel Photography Over-exposed sky

Page
  • 1
  • 2

Last Post

11. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3606 posts) 5y

Quoting Q'

Going back to this topic. I've been dying to try the Fuji EXR sensor system. Basically it's a two pass sensor, one at high sensitivity for the shadows and one at lower sensitivity for the highlights. It sounds really interesting. Might give you more dynamic range to pick out the details in the bright sky and deep shadow.

Interesting; I hadn't heard of that feature. On a similar note, another feature which could get round the over/underexposing issue is HDR - where the camera takes 3 shots of varying exposure and puts them on top of each other so both bright and dark parts are captured.

12. Posted by Q' (Moderator 1987 posts) 5y

Quoting bex76

Quoting Q'

Going back to this topic. I've been dying to try the Fuji EXR sensor system. Basically it's a two pass sensor, one at high sensitivity for the shadows and one at lower sensitivity for the highlights. It sounds really interesting. Might give you more dynamic range to pick out the details in the bright sky and deep shadow.

Interesting; I hadn't heard of that feature. On a similar note, another feature which could get round the over/underexposing issue is HDR - where the camera takes 3 shots of varying exposure and puts them on top of each other so both bright and dark parts are captured.

HDR is another solution if your scene doesn't have any movement.
Fuji likes to experiment with technology. They're not the Nikon, Canon or Sony, so they are forced to innovate.

13. Posted by magykal1 (Travel Guru 2026 posts) 4y

One slightly sneaky thing you can do is to take 2 identical shots, one set up on the subject and one on the sky - then you can use photoshop to bung the good sky back into your picture. Kinda DIY HDR. It's not ideal though, Q's solution sounds better.

Page
  • 1
  • 2