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Where to live in uk?

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1. Posted by arch711 (Budding Member 2 posts) 7y

arch711 has indicated that this thread is about United Kingdom

I am moving to the United Kingdom next year to study architecture. I have noooo idea what to base my decision on. Any suggestions are welcome. I am thinking of Cardiff, Bath, Sheffield, Newcastle, Manchester, Nottingham, Canterbury and of course London. How is it like living in these different places? I am 18 year old female, I want a fun and friendly city with a lively young lifestyle. Thanks! :)

2. Posted by j140870 (Budding Member 9 posts) 7y

Apart from the course being a ig factor, i'd choose Manchester. Good social scene. Great buildings. Cheaper than London.

3. Posted by BedouinLeo (Inactive 698 posts) 7y

Architecture in Manchester is wonderful. A true contrast of ancient an modern in one city. It has an example, the world's tallest Hilton Hotel and two of Europe's oldest (still trading) pubs. The night life is very good, the airport can get you to just about anywhere across the continent (and country too) without changing flights, as well as many long hauls as well, accommodation is widely available cheaper than London, although there are still million pound pads if that's your thing, there is an excellent public transport network on trains, buses and trams and it is a city surrounded on every side by natural beauty no more than a short ride away. The Peak District, Lake District, North Wales (Snowdonia), Yorkshire Moors, North Yorkshire Dales and Pennines are all reachable by train from Manchester Piccadilly station. The National Rail Network is pretty much all at your fingertips from Piccadilly, without having to change trains, unlike London where you have to either change or go to different stations to get to different parts of the UK. It's possible to get a train from Piccadilly to just about every county in England, Scotland and Wales.
Employment is good in the region with many weekly free publications full of jobs.
Weather wise, don't believe all you here about North - v - South. The weather in the Northwest is so similar to the South that you'll not notice the difference. If it's 20c in London, it'll be around 18c in Manchester and if it's -8c up North, it'll be -6c down there.
London will be a challenge every day, although some days the challenge can be fun. Beware though, if the trains or buses go on strike as they often do, it's hell on earth getting to work - in fact getting anywhere. Employers in the 'Smoke' don't have a lot of sympathy for workers who are late because of industrial action.
Accommodation will usually be cheaper in Manchester and the chances are you'll get more space for less money. The cost of living is a little cheaper than London, but not by much.
Newcastle is a bustling city with a bunch of extremely friendly locals. The weekends up there are good and cheap. It's one of England's cheapest cities and renting a place can produce a nice surprise most of the time.
Nottingham and the surrounding area is full of history, but sadly the city itself has one of the highest crime rates in the country. Again, the night life is good and there is something very special about Sherwood Forest, regardless of how much you believe about Robin and his gang.
Sheffield is a very industrial city and the inner ring road is a continuous nightmare if you're driving or on a bike. However, out of the places you mention, it has the best night life out of all of them, including London. Accommodation in Sheffield is abundant and can be very cheap if you've the time to seek out the bargains.
Cardiff is a very vibrant city and has had billions of pounds spent on it over recent years. You'll like what you find. Well worth considering and good to take a weekend break to look around.
Canterbury and Bath are two places of great historical interest during the day, but at night they're pretty poor for entertainment to compared to all the others. You'll also find accommodation prices scary. Out of the two I prefer Bath, but that is only a personal opinion.
If I had to pick out two from your list, they would be Manchester and Newcastle.

4. Posted by monkeycat (Full Member 109 posts) 7y

London will be a challenge every day, although some days the challenge can be fun. Beware though, if the trains or buses go on strike as they often do, it's hell on earth getting to work - in fact getting anywhere.

What does often mean in your books, once every few years? Not exactly often. I think you meant infrequently. Yes it's a pain but then again, London is a pretty easy city to cycle around. It's mostly flat, apart from the occasional steep hill, and it doesn't rain as much as you think it might. Cycling is definitely the quickest and cheapest way of getting around. It takes me 15 minutes to get to the centre on my bike, but would take 30 by bus and similar by underground.

London is expensive, but if you know how to budget, and you do your research, living is not as bad as you think it would be. I live very comfortably on less than 100 pounds a week, not including bills.

Sure beats Newcastle...

5. Posted by connor693 (Budding Member 39 posts) 7y

HI,
I think nottingham would be a good choice. Its got very good nightlife if your intertesed in that, alot of shops and the accomodation for students is reasonable prices. Also i dont know which university it is i think nottingham trent but it was rated 6th best in the u.k last year. Nottingham can be bad for crime in certain areas but no worse than any other big cities.
hope this helps

6. Posted by BedouinLeo (Inactive 698 posts) 7y

Quoting monkeycat

London will be a challenge every day, although some days the challenge can be fun. Beware though, if the trains or buses go on strike as they often do, it's hell on earth getting to work - in fact getting anywhere.

What does often (1) mean in your books, once every few years? Not exactly often. I think you meant infrequently. Yes it's a pain but then again, London is a pretty easy city to cycle around. It's mostly flat, apart from the occasional steep hill, and it doesn't rain as much as you think it might. (2) Cycling is definitely the quickest and cheapest way of getting around. It takes me 15 minutes to get to the centre on my bike, but would take 30 by bus and similar by underground.

London is expensive, but if you know how to budget, and you do your research, living is not as bad as you think it would be. I live very comfortably on less than 100 pounds a week, not including bills. (3)

Sure beats Newcastle...

1.. Often = Whenever they feel like it. There have 27 cases of industrial action on The Underground and buses this year.
2.. There've been 122 days of rain in London so far this year. Don't quote me - The London Weather Centre will agree.
3.. Add on the bills and it's in the mire for finding affordable entertainment - v - income.
Give me a northern city any day. Less labouring required for more money left over = better times.. Fact. Sorry London, but you're just not affordable for a 'proper' good weekend anymore, unless you're an MP or The Mayor.

7. Posted by Craggy (Budding Member 43 posts) 7y

Brighton has a great vibe and there's lots to do. It's not the biggest of places but the best place I've lived in England so far. The architecture in Brighton itself is interesting enough if you like 19th Century Regency - There's the Pavilion that was developed around the same period to it's current style etc. London is great for architecture just due to the variation of styles, although you often have to search it out. Bath is another great city architecturally but not so much variation.
I'm moving to London soon just to find some work, but I'd still be happy to remain in Brighton for awhile longer otherwise.
Good luck!

8. Posted by mojorob (Moderator 1047 posts) 7y

Quoting BedouinLeo

1.. Often = Whenever they feel like it. There have 27 cases of industrial action on The Underground and buses this year.
2.. There've been 122 days of rain in London so far this year. Don't quote me - The London Weather Centre will agree.

Your preferred Manchester is not immune to public transport strikes - I believe there has been industrial action in Greater Manchester both last month as well as this week?

With rainfall, it's a little misleading to say there have been a certain amount of days of rain - though I'm not sure where you got this number from. Days of rain could mean a number of things, and it doesn't make any mention about volume of rain on any of those days. There is potentially a wide margin here - e.g. 122 x 24 hours of rain, or 122 days where rain fell for 5 minutes on each of these days.

9. Posted by Giselle80 (Budding Member 3 posts) 6y

I would definately choose London, have lived and worked there for several months, and till that time everywhere else feel homesick. You always feel in the middle of epicentre however you can get wonderfull feeling you are home. City with a special spirit. Also there are more study options as far as I have explored different universities in London.
Certainly I will go back to London one day!

10. Posted by Jennyyore (Budding Member 66 posts) 6y

I live a few miles away from Canterbury, and sometimes work there during the week.
It is a great city with lots of historical features not to mention the Cathedral.
Canterbury has lots of shops, so some shopwork available for students.
London is 1hour 15 mins by train.
The Herne Bay (seaside) is 10 miles away.
Whitstable famous for oysters is about 6 miles away, Margate and Ramsgate about 15 miles.
Canterbury has two universities and a large student population.
Public transport is good, trains or buses.