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1. Posted by gilla (First Time Poster 1 posts) 7y

hey jus wondering if anyone is able to help me out with a few questions i have bout travelling to the uk.

I have dual citizenship for Australia and uk. Now I have never been over to the uk but I managed to get a uk passport because of my father and mother both being born over there. So ill get to the point after I got my uk passport I got caught up in a bit mess and now have criminal record. So I was jus wondering am I still able to travel to uk n work n live. And also what are the stance of other countries in the EU with same matter.

2. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 7y

I am no UK immigrations law expert, but the way I interpret this, you risk being deprived of your UK citizenship because of your conviction, depending on how serious your offense was.

At the risk of awaking any sleeping dogs, I'd pass by the UK consulate and make inquiries beforehand. Should you be deprived of your UK citizenship, there is also a fair chance that a visa application will be denied for the same reason.

3. Posted by mojorob (Moderator 1047 posts) 7y

Quoting bentivogli

I am no UK immigrations law expert, but the way I interpret this, you risk being deprived of your UK citizenship because of your conviction, depending on how serious your offense was.

I'm not convinced that this document is relevant to this case, as it seems to refer to people who have either registered or been naturalised as British citizens. The OP I presume was born in Australia (if not, it may make a difference) to British-born parents (again I presume at least one of those parents are British by birth). This would make them a British citizen by descent.

The birth certificate process in Australia is recognised by the UK as good enough for registration not being required - this is to say, when a person born in Australia is British by descent the only thing required is to apply for a passport. No registration (with the High Commission) required, no naturalisation required. Of course, I'm no expert on immigration/citizenship law either, however I'm going on the experience of getting a UK passport for my Australian-born child.

4. Posted by bentivogli (Travel Guru 2398 posts) 7y

Quoting mojorob

I'm not convinced that this document is relevant to this case

That's what I thought at first, until I read section 55.3.1.1 of that document, which states that

"...Under s.40 of the 1981 Act, as amended by the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002 from 1 April 2003 and by the Immigration, Asylum and Nationality Act 2006 from 16 June 2006, any British citizen, British overseas territories citizen, British Overseas citizen, British National (Overseas), British protected person or British subject may, by Order, be deprived of his or her citizenship or status if the Home Secretary is satisfied that ..."

That is, as far as the rules on deprivation are concerned, it is irrelevant how you obtained UK citizenship. As long as deprivation does not make you stateless, it can be taken from you.

[ Edit: Edited on 15-Oct-2009, at 01:16 by bentivogli ]

5. Posted by mojorob (Moderator 1047 posts) 7y

That's a little scary if it really does mean any British citizen.