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Cochin India

Travel Forums Asia Cochin India

1. Posted by KH Chin (Budding Member 6 posts) 6y

I am planning to go to Cochin India Oct 2010, i am looking for advise or information about said place

2. Posted by M_Lester (Budding Member 9 posts) 6y

Long time since I was there, but it's a great place. make sure you have a place with a mossie net though, it's a swamp.
message me if you want more info.

[ Edit: Sorry, no promos please. ]

3. Posted by M_Lester (Budding Member 9 posts) 6y

Quoting M_Lester

[ Edit: Sorry, no promos please. ]

oh come on guys, I've transgressed now in every post I've made. Just cos this guy got no responses in two weeks to a legitimate query, you cant be that desperate for contributors.
here's a list of people looking for travel buddies
and thats just in 4 pages of asia

if you want to travel round India on the ultimate epic train ride for 2 weeks with a bunch of other fruit cakes, please message me, but make it quick ;)

4. Posted by darkchild (Budding Member 25 posts) 6y

Hey KH Chin,
I am from Kerala, currently working in Bangalore, India. Towards the end of August, I went on a week long trip to Kerala and covered Kumarakkom, Thekkady and Cochin. I had written a detailed blog with photos on my workplace's photography club site but unfortunately you may not be able to access it as it open to usually only employees.

So I've cut and pasted an excerpt from that post just about the bit where we arrived in Cochin:

"We arrived in Ernakulam (the city hub of Cochin) late in the evening and after a coffee break, took an auto and headed to Fort Kochi -- the most popular tourist spot in Cochin district. The island of Fort Kochi, connected by road and regular ferry services, houses pretty much all the popular tourist attractions; making it the ideal spot to spend most of your time once you arrive in Cochin.

Given the distance we had covered, the auto journey cost us around Rs. 150. We then hunted for a place to stay and even though we did find cheaper options, we ended up opting for a Rs. 800+ double room at Sonnetta Residency on Princess Street. It was a clean and rather strict homestay (as far as house rules go) but we liked the room and the fact it was actually good value, given all that we got in the room. (Namely, 24-hrs hot water supply!)

Next day, we checked out the much-hyped Kashi Art Cafe for breakfast -- recommended by the Lonely Planet. But don't get your hopes up (too) high. It isn't some out-of-this-world cafe with exquisite food on the menu.

After breakfast, we took the advice of our homestay owner and hired an auto to visit Jew Town (it only came around Rs. 30 or so) and the other attractions in that area.

First stop was the Dutch Palace a.k.a Mattancherry Palace, now turned into a museum of sorts with art and other artifacts on display behind glass with signs that say "Do Not Touch". But knowing how many Indians are, there's a guy employed to follow you around and keep an eye on visitors, just for extra measure. The palace doesn't really look like a palace per se and isn't very big. But with a price of admission of less than Rs. 3 per person (I don't remember exactly how much we paid) and the fact that you'll be done with it in less than 15 minutes, it's worth the history.

Home to the world's only pepper exchange, Jew Town is a small port area now cramped with antiques stores and other businesses.

We left Jew Town by noon and headed back to Princess Street as we had to check out of our rooms. Done with the formalities, we then went to see the Chinese fishing nets that lined the coast line nearby. The Chinese fishing nets are more a tourist attraction these days than a practical means for catching fish.

The shorelines of Fort Kochi aren't the cleanliest of all places, in fact the beach is a sad mess really. Blame the throngs of tourists and lack of any civic concern. But it hasn't stopped people from hanging out here or even taking a nap on a sunny afternoon.

After the sun got to us on our walk, we decided to lunch. After lunch stops at two restaurants, we resumed our walk to see the remaining tourist stops in the area. There are sign boards and enough tourist-friendly locals to help you get around. So we took their help to get to our next stop, the Dutch Cemetary.

We then walked back to the homestay, collected our bags and thanked the owner for keeping an eye on it while we had roamed around. Since we had a few hours to spare before ending this (awesome) trip, we decided to visit the neighbouring Vypin Island. We walked to the close-by ferry station(?), bought our Rs. 2 tickets and waited for our boat. It's only Rs. 2 because the trip only lasts three minutes.

Upon reaching Vypin, we pondered as to what to actually do here because there really wasn't a whole lot to see. So we took the recommendation of the auto drivers -- and saw even more Chinese fishing nets along the shore line.

At sunset, we took the ferry ride to Ernakulam."

Let me know if you have any specific questions.