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What is the correct term for Hong Kong nationals?

Travel Forums Asia What is the correct term for Hong Kong nationals?

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1. Posted by SuperBrat (Full Member, 107 posts) 9 Feb '10 08:16

SuperBrat has indicated that this thread is about Hong Kong

Hi everyone,
is there a term for Hong Kong nationals ie: New York = New Yorkers, Vietnam = Vietnamese, Britain = British, Finland = Finnish etc etc?

Thanks muchly,
Christine

2. Posted by Sam I Am (Admin, 5577 posts) 9 Feb '10 09:15

Chinese?

3. Posted by lil_lil (Travel Guru, 462 posts) 9 Feb '10 12:52

For me (and the people I know) it's Hongkies, but I think this is a rather informal term. More officially, I believe they're Hongkongers, or Chinese (I have a feeling some people may debate this, especially if they still think Hong Kong separately from China).

4. Posted by ELIZ_L (Budding Member, 35 posts) 10 Feb '10 05:32

Hi , I am HongKonger!
Normally ( esp. for the youth) , we call ourselves HongKonger more than Chinese.
(The exceptional case is while we passing the immigration, we are Chinese =P)

5. Posted by Sam I Am (Admin, 5577 posts) 10 Feb '10 05:49

So 'officially' maybe Chinese, but HongKonger is the preferred term in day-to-day. It's interesting that this is something I've never actually thought about until I saw this thread pop up!!

6. Posted by lil_lil (Travel Guru, 462 posts) 10 Feb '10 14:52

Well I guess there's a sort of strange relationship among the Chinese communities. From observation, Chinese from China identify themselves as 中國人 "zhong guo ren" (i.e. people from China) whereas they tend identify other non-China born ethnically Chinese people are 华人 "hua ren" (i.e. people of Chinese origin). The two groups are not afforded the same recognition, although the same identifying word Chinese is used in general.

7. Posted by Hien (Moderator, 3906 posts) 10 Feb '10 22:22

From the way I see it, with Hong Kong now back in Chinese rule, the term Hongkongers is now on the same level as the terms Shanghainese, New Yorkers, Londoners -- they're regional. But when speaking on nationality level, I believe the correct term should be Chinese as they are technically part of China.

Speaking of the terms for the Chinese people, this is my understanding:

  • 中国人 (zhōngguó rén) - literally means people of China - usually used in the nationality sense
  • 华人 (huárén) - lit. people of ethnic Chinese - a more general term for all Chinese people (though sometimes only the Han Chinese) regardless of nationality.

When speaking about overseas Chinese, several terms are used:

  • 海外华人 (hǎiwài huárén) - lit. overseas Chinese - often used by the Government of China
  • 华侨 (huáqiáo) - lit. Chinese emigrant/residing abroad (away from China)
  • 华裔 (huáyì) - lit. Chinese descendant
  • 唐人 (tángrén) - lit. people of Tang (in reference to Tang dynasty China when it was ruling China proper) - used by the overseas Chinese of Cantonese, Hakka and Hokkien origin as a colloquial reference to the Chinese people)
8. Posted by loubylou (Travel Guru, 664 posts) 11 Feb '10 04:40

Quoting Hien

But when speaking on nationality level, I believe the correct term should be Chinese as they are technically part of China.

But people who are Hong Kong nationals don't hold a Chinese passport, they have a Hong Kong passport. So, technically they are not Chinese, they are nationals of Hong Kong, SAR (Special Administrative Region of China). Everyone we have met from Hong Kong have termed themselves as 'Hong Kongers' rather than Chinese.

There are also differences in visa rules for HKSAR passport holders than PRC passport holders - for example a HKSAR passport holder can enter the UK without the need for a visa.

[ Edit: Edited on 11-Feb-2010, at 04:44 by loubylou ]

9. Posted by opospa (Travel Guru, 1836 posts) 11 Feb '10 06:12

Hongkies

10. Posted by Hien (Moderator, 3906 posts) 11 Feb '10 06:59

Quoting loubylou

Quoting Hien

But when speaking on nationality level, I believe the correct term should be Chinese as they are technically part of China.

But people who are Hong Kong nationals don't hold a Chinese passport, they have a Hong Kong passport. So, technically they are not Chinese, they are nationals of Hong Kong, SAR (Special Administrative Region of China). Everyone we have met from Hong Kong have termed themselves as 'Hong Kongers' rather than Chinese.

There are also differences in visa rules for HKSAR passport holders than PRC passport holders - for example a HKSAR passport holder can enter the UK without the need for a visa.

Ah... yeah. I'd forgotten about the different passports they hold.