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Anybody out there feel my pain??!

Travel Forums General Talk Anybody out there feel my pain??!

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11. Posted by Swept Away (Travel Guru 1113 posts) 6y

Quoting fabyomama

Quoting Utrecht

Quoting Swept Away

Get a better boyfriend.

I don't get it. Did you read the OP?

It meant her boyfriend should be taking her mind off her 'pent up anxiety'.

The statement had a cheesy grin.

12. Posted by fabyomama (Respected Member 560 posts) 6y

Agree with exploring America, especially the parks. But what about driving down through South America? You still have some of the cheapest fuel prices in the world - about half what we pay. :(

13. Posted by fabyomama (Respected Member 560 posts) 6y

Quoting Swept Away

Quoting fabyomama

Quoting Utrecht

Quoting Swept Away

Get a better boyfriend.

I don't get it. Did you read the OP?

It meant her boyfriend should be taking her mind off her 'pent up anxiety'.

The statement had a cheesy grin.

Which is what he should be having if he's doing his job properly. ;)

14. Posted by emilyemily (Budding Member 82 posts) 6y

Hehehe... love all the responses on this!!

America is, in fact, a huge and interesting country, but I've already been to 42 of the 50 states and every national park east of Oklahoma (I have already done the whole Westfalia road hippie thing for 2 years after high school... what, you think this travel bug just started out so ambitious?? :)) Also as a rule, I don't find myself particularly interested in anywhere so familiar, where English is spoken, I know how to get around, and everything is generally super easy. I'm a cultural traveller more than a nature traveller, so staying in my home country doesn't do anything at all to make me less antsy!. For me, travelling is all about going outside my comfort zone, and let's face it- The US is a very comfortable country.

To Fabyomama- I would love to do a trip to South America! You're right, our fuel is relatively inexpensive and I speak Spanish... but unfortunately, to get to the fascinating, safe countries of Uruguay, Chile, etc, I would have to drive through some of the most dangerous and drug-war torn countries on Earth... In fact, the US government has issued big time travel advisories for several Central and Southern American countries, and since I'm a girl who generally travels alone, I don't know if the time is right... here's to hoping Guatemala and Colombia get their act together sometime soon so I can go visit!

To Dodger, who said I wasn't grateful for what I have worked VERY HARD to have?? Because I want to explore and appreciate other parts of this world doesn't mean I'm ungrateful. That's actually quite offensive... I'd say I'm far MORE grateful for what I have than the average American twenty-something, having chosen to spend much of my precious vacation time volunteering in a Nepali women's shelter, talking to street kids in India, visiting war sites in Vietnam, need I go on??! I'd say that's a little different than your typical Californian Cabo spring-breaker.

To all the random, off-topic remarks about my boyfriend (where did that even come from..?), he is absolutely amazing and travels with me whenever he can afford to. Believe me, of course he isn't happy about my passion for being everywhere but here, but he can't take my mind off it just like I can't take his mind off his hobbies. He does an amazing job making me happy, but my whole life doesn't revolve around my boyfriend! lol ;)

And lastly, to the few that gave me proper responses about how to feel better about my situation, you're awesome! I've definitely looked into working abroad, and am actually currently in the process of getting my TEFL certificate so I can support myself wherever I choose to go. Is it really that complicated to get work visas though?? I hope not.. I have alot of British friends that went to Australia for a year to work, and they make it sound so easy! I don't know the details though... here's to hoping not too much red tape!

T_Maia, I like your attitude about just getting up and going! :) That's definitely how I feel about it, and I have done alot of camping trips and a cylce trip through Vietnam... such a nice way to see the country! Unfortunately, a return flight from the US to just about anywhere I'd want to go in the world is well over $1000, and that's if I get lucky and find a rare good deal! :(

  • Sigh* Oh well... I'm just going to have to try and adjust to staying in one spot for awhile!!
15. Posted by t_maia (Travel Guru 3289 posts) 6y

I've definitely looked into working abroad, and am actually currently in the process of getting my TEFL certificate so I can support myself wherever I choose to go. Is it really that complicated to get work visas though?? I hope not.. I have alot of British friends that went to Australia for a year to work, and they make it sound so easy! I don't know the details though... here's to hoping not too much red tape!

UK citizens have it easy, they (and other nationalities) participate in the Working Holiday Visa Scheme.

For US citizens there are no such easy options. No WHV's for you because it is reciprocial - and the U.S. government isn't keen on a lot of young Europeans, Australians and Kiwis coming over to the US to work for a year.

So teaching English is usually the only option to US citizens, in many cases the only way to get a work visa. Au-pair is also a popular option with young women.

However if you have a college degree note that there is a special visa category similar to the WHV that allows US citizens with a college degree to work for up to a year in Australia.

There are is also an exception to the rules that makes it easier for US citizens to get a normal job in Germany and the Netherlands: US citizens can apply for the necessary papers after entry. This gives you a chance to come over, find a job and then hope that the government gives you a work and residency permit. For all other countries you have to secure a job first, then after the sucessful interview you must return to the USA and apply for the necessary papers at the embassy in the USA. You can imagine that not many companies will wait 3 months and more for you while your papers are processed - you need to be a highly-qualified specialist in your field to have a fighting chance.

Other "job" opportunies are Peace Corps and working as a Civil Servant in the US Armed Forces.

You should also take a look at your ancestry - in many cases you can claim citizenship or right of residency by descent. If for example one of your greatgrandparents emigrated to the USA from Ireland you can sometimes claim Irish and consequently EU citizenship from that ancestor. It would allow you to work legally in all EU member states.

16. Posted by The Stig (Budding Member 15 posts) 6y

"....and sleeping in a small tent, often in a field" ABSOLUTELY! I used to do that!

..and I'll go for drives in the country and wander around with my camera and waste the whole day and enjoy every minute doing it...these days are my mini breaks, they keep me sane until my next holiday.

I'm always planning my next trip- that way Im working towards something.

But I think the ultimate cure for itchy feet would be to combine travel with work.

17. Posted by lmilazzo90 (Budding Member 8 posts) 6y

I totally know the feeling! I get the worst still-sickness (the opposite of motion sickness... I only get it when I stay in one place for to long ) Planning trips totally helps for me! I've even booked some of them! A Europe trip, Belize trip and studying abroad... but its totally put me in debt Part of my problem with road trips is that they're sooooo expensive! Nobody is offering up deals on renting cars or staying at hostels or motels :'( added to the fact that the US is soooo big! To go anywhere you've go to have time! Even if you've got the money if you only have a weekend you're slightly limited.
I would say find some money and just go. Even if you only end up driving for a day and staying a night in some place different! It's a mini trip and you're still moving ;)

18. Posted by madpoet (Respected Member 413 posts) 6y

Sometimes, if you can't travel, planning a trip is almost as much fun. It gives you something to look forward to.

19. Posted by margaretm (Respected Member 9 posts) 6y

I had the same feeling, did a year's voluntary work in Nepal where I also discovered I liked teaching English. When I returned to England, I got qualified as a TEFL teacher and then went to teach in Turkey and Spain, ended up marrying and having a family and am now living in Mexico! I've managed to keep travelling and love the "exotic" feel of being out of my "home country" , immersed in new languages, new cultures and travelling now with my kids as well. Having lived out of my own country for so long, it's now beginning to feel "exotic" even to me!

As an English teacher, you do have the possibility of living in a country and really getting to know it and the people well. They often teach you a lot of their language too!

Some of my travels have been to visit countries where I have family or friends living - Zimbabwe, Seychelles, Honduras etc... That way I've seen the country from a "local's point of view" and it's not so expensive. Camping is also a good option if you're in certain parts of the globe.

While you're waiting to go, I agree - read up a lot, plan, let your imagination wander, write up accounts of your previous travels, sort out your photos and pin up maps everywhere you can!
Good luck with your travels!

20. Posted by loco2 (Budding Member 2 posts) 6y

I feel your pain so much! I got back in October after being away for 2 years and 4 months non stop; a round the world trip without flying - on cargo ships, buses, trains, mopeds, living on boats, the trans-Siberian, even some horses and once a yak cart! I know how you feel. The only thing that is keeping me going is embracing what's good about home and writing all about my trip to inspire other people to go and have a loco2travel adventure.