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IMPORTANT PHRASES IN HOW MANY LANGUAGES????

Travel Forums General Talk IMPORTANT PHRASES IN HOW MANY LANGUAGES????

1. Posted by zaksame (Respected Member 571 posts) 6y

Recently in East Africa I was talking to some local guys who, as usual in EA, were swapping between Swahili, English and some tribal languages - not to mention Sheng - and I thought to myself wouldn't it be great to set up a small resource where you could find the most important phrases in any language you want.

With all the travelers we have here I bet lots of people could pitch in with the Most Important phrase or two (in a language that is foreign to them of course) that they've used on their travels.

Anyway, it's just an idea but maybe one to appeals to others.

As I say in Swahili when I walk into a bar after a hard, hot day: "Tusker tafadhali" and then when I've gulped down that first sluice of cold, yellow nectar I turn to the barman and utter the famous words of the Tusker Commercials... "Baada ya kazi!" and wipe my lips. It only means "after work" but it goes down a treat for the locals to hear a Mzungu using a little swahili.

2. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3713 posts) 6y

I really like this idea; when I go away I always try and learn a few phrases in the native language (normally thank you, hello and goodbye) so it would be useful to have a resource for that on here. It really means a lot to the locals when travellers make an effort to talk to them in their language.

What about incorporating this into the travel guide somehow?

3. Posted by flyingbob (Inactive 842 posts) 6y

Would be a great little forum.
I can say hello, goodbye, please and thank you in loads of different languages, plus other little phrases in about 20 or so. It really isn't difficult to keep them inside your head.
Great idea.

4. Posted by Araluen (Respected Member 346 posts) 6y

This is a really super idea. Even if you only learn a few basic words/phrases like hello, good morning, thankyou and goodbye, it would be very helpful. I found that saying (for example) good morning or thank you was well received and their eyes lit up. The (local) people liked that a foreigner could be bothered to speak a few words in their language.

5. Posted by madpoet (Respected Member 413 posts) 6y

Besides "hello, goodbye, please, thank you and sorry/excuse me", the most useful phrases in other languages, I find, are usually the 5Ws: "Where (is the washroom/bus/hotel?), When (does the train leave/museum open?), What (am I eating?), Why (are you staring at me?), Who (should I talk to about this problem?) and How much (is this going to cost me?)"

Most languages use a decimal system, so that "eleven" is "ten+one". So if you learn 1-10 in the language, you can say almost any number. (For example, in Chinese, 10 is "shi" and 1 is "yi", so 11 is "shi-yi") It's very useful for buying and selling in the local market, or haggling with souvenir sellers.

But anyways, isn't that why God invented phrasebooks?

6. Posted by flyingbob (Inactive 842 posts) 6y

One word that seems to be pretty universal (and quite handy at times to know) across the globe, is 'Police'.
It's usually Polici, Politsia, Politzei etc. But check it out in Welsh (Heddlu) and Icelandic (Rikislogreglan).
Just in case.. eh?

7. Posted by zaksame (Respected Member 571 posts) 6y

Quoting madpoet

But anyways, isn't that why God invented phrasebooks?

Guidebooks are great but I just thought that maybe on TP somewhere there could be a place to find some phrases and uncommon words in uncommon - and common - languages that our members could use when no phrase book or guide book is close to hand.

But, hey it's just another of my hair-brained ideas maybe.

Thanks for all the input so far though. Or as we say in Gaelige 'Go raibh mile mhaith agat' - 1000 thank you's.

8. Posted by zaksame (Respected Member 571 posts) 6y

Quoting flyingbob

One word that seems to be pretty universal (and quite handy at times to know) across the globe, is 'Police'.
It's usually Polici, Politsia, Politzei etc. But check it out in Welsh (Heddlu) and Icelandic (Rikislogreglan).
Just in case.. eh?

It's GARDA in Ireland or Gardai as plural. Both short for Garda Siochana which means guardian of the peace - I believe.

Post 9 was removed by a moderator