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Travelling from America to Canada and back, problems?

Travel Forums North America Travelling from America to Canada and back, problems?

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11. Posted by Hanky96 (Budding Member 6 posts) 6y

Excuse my ignorance but what is the 1-94W?

"2. Remember to surrender your 1-94W (paper slip) when leaving the USA to the Canadian official at the Canadian border (or airline if you fly) on your return trip. This slip will cost $6.00 upon arrival."

Are you saying on my return out of the USA back into canada I need to give this slip in?

12. Posted by lagosmm (Budding Member 50 posts) 6y

The 1-94W is a paper slip that the US uses for foreign visitors that is attached in your passport. This slip is removed upon your arrival.

See the link below for the details. I took out a few excerpts that would apply to your case:

"In general, if you have been admitted to the United States under most visa classifications if you take a short trip (30 days or less) to Canada or Mexico, you may retain your I-94/I-94W, so that when you resume your visit to the United States you are readmitted for the balance of the time remaining on your I-94/I-94W"

"It is your responsibility to ensure that your I-94/I-94W is turned in to Customs and Border Protection (CBP) at the end of your visit to the United States.

-If you are departing by air, please turn the I-94/I-94W into the airline prior to departure.
-If you are departing by sea, please turn the I-94/I-94W into the shipping line prior to departure.
-If you are departing by land and you will not be returning to the United States within 30 days, please turn the I-94/I-94W into the Canadian or Mexican authorities upon departure from the United States."

http://www.cbp.gov/xp/cgov/travel/id_visa/i-94_instructions/filling_out_i94.xml

Post 13 was removed by a moderator
14. Posted by goltho (Budding Member 6 posts) 6y

Hi,

I've just about got my around the requirements, but hope someone can specifically shed some light on the following. I'm in the UK and have a new 10-year US visa. I do understand that the 6-month clock does not normally stop when you exit the US by road to Canada. However, here is our scenario, and I'd appreciate some help:-

a) fly into the States in May 2011
b) spend 1 month in the States before driving into Canada
c) spend 3½ months in Canada before driving back into the States
d) spend 1 month in the States before flying back to the UK
e) spend 3 months in the UK before flying back to the States
f) send 3½ month in the States before flying back to the UK

This would mean a total of 5½ months in the US and 3½ months in Canada (a-f) during a 12-month period. Will this however in reality clock up a total of 5½ months (a-d) during the 5½-month period? If so, that leaves ½ month when we return for the second leg (f) where we need 3½ months. My two prime questions so far then are:-
1) How can I stop the visa clock when exiting the US by road to Canada (see b above)?
2) If I can't stop the clock, what is the likelihood of being granted a further 3½ months when re-entering the US on the second leg (see f above)?

I know we will have to produce a return air ticket in order to gain entry to the US in May 2011 but we can cancel or amend that as discussed in earlier posts, and would drive out instead to Canada. So - what do we tell the guy at the US gate on first arrival? Should we book a 1-month return ticket in the UK before leaving, show them on arrival, and ask for a 1-month stamp?

I have read the other posters' contributions regarding the 90-day waivers, but am not clear whether there will be a different view taken because we have 10-year visas. Any factual help you could give, will be much appreciated.

15. Posted by lagosmm (Budding Member 50 posts) 6y

Goltho, as you have a visa (B1 and/or B2) you are exempt from the return air ticket requirement. However some documents showing your travel plans are helpful. Murphy's law pretty much says they only ask for them when you don't carry them...
I have more or less continuously held these I-94 permits in my passport and surrendered them now and then and got new ones. The clock runs but it doesn't matter as long as you aren't actually in the country. The only potential problem is a red flag and you may have to prove that you did in fact leave.

I suggest however that given the time you're in Canada you should surrender your I-94 upon entering Canada and make sure the Canadian official stamps your passport (best and easiest proof of leaving). This also stops the clock. This is a good measure in case your plans change due to emergency and you can't make it back through the US.
This only slightly inconveniences you when going back into the US since you'll have to get out of the car and fill out a new one plus pay a $6 fee.

16. Posted by goltho (Budding Member 6 posts) 6y

Quoting lagosmm

Goltho, as you have a visa (B1 and/or B2) you are exempt from the return air ticket requirement. However some documents showing your travel plans are helpful. Murphy's law pretty much says they only ask for them when you don't carry them...
I have more or less continuously held these I-94 permits in my passport and surrendered them now and then and got new ones. The clock runs but it doesn't matter as long as you aren't actually in the country. The only potential problem is a red flag and you may have to prove that you did in fact leave.

I suggest however that given the time you're in Canada you should surrender your I-94 upon entering Canada and make sure the Canadian official stamps your passport (best and easiest proof of leaving). This also stops the clock. This is a good measure in case your plans change due to emergency and you can't make it back through the US.
This only slightly inconveniences you when going back into the US since you'll have to get out of the car and fill out a new one plus pay a $6 fee.

This confirms what I've been told elsewhere this week (i.e. what the B1/B2 visa does in comparison to the more restrictive VW) so thank you very much for that.

I can live with getting out the car & paying $6.

Is the I-94 surrendered to US immigration on exiting the US, or to Canadian immigration upon entry to Canada? I guess it'll all become clear on the day, but forearmed is forewarned.

17. Posted by lagosmm (Budding Member 50 posts) 6y

There is no exit procedure on the Canadian border - only on the Mexican border. So, you submit it to a Canadian official. Keep in mind that the official will not ask for it.

18. Posted by cgareth (First Time Poster 1 posts) 5y

Hi all,

I have a similar query to those above, but as each everyone's specifics seem to be unique, hope it's not bad form to start up this thread again.

I'm going to Toronto for work in September. The job finishes at the end of October. I've arranged to spend the next six weeks travelling across the US before returning to Toronto for my return flight to the UK.

From the information I've gleaned from here, it looks as if the only forms I need to fill in will be given to me at the border crossing. Apart from my passport and a photo ID UK and international passport, I don't think I need to worry about anything else.

Am I correct?

Thanks in advance.

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