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View of Japan

Travel Forums Asia View of Japan

1. Posted by fykodha (Budding Member 20 posts) 6y

Please view previous post:

http://www.travellerspoint.com/forum.cfm?thread=44755

This post is specifically on Japan (Tokyo, Kyoto). Japan attracts me as it offers the very purest, albeit old, Asian culture, architecture, and technology. I recently watched the film, Lost in Translation. This movie makes me want to live in Japan.

I visited Vietnam, so I am familiar with the region. My real concern with Japan is the language. Please post your experience and thought on destination Japan.

2. Posted by prendy98 (Full Member 78 posts) 5y

Hey,

Personally when I traveled to Japan I almost instantly fell in love with the country, its people, the culture an the whole vibe of
the place.

I was backpacking through south east asia an on a whim i decided to goto Japan for 3weeks an endedup staying there for
4months, i think that says it all.

I guess it just depends like every destination what your expectations are an if they can be exceeded which they were for
myself.

Ultra modern Tokyo, maniac city yet has a constant feel of electricity flowing through the place with a cool hip vibe. You can relax in Asakusa
one of Tokyo's few districts, which have preserved a certain atmosphere of the old Tokyo. Akihabara district in central Tokyo, famous for its many electronics shops an every gadget you could imagine. Harajuku is the center of Japan's most extreme teenage cultures and fashion styles, which has to be seen to be believed. Shibuya, one of Tokyo's most colorful and busy districts and birthplace to many of Japan's fashion and entertainment trends.

Then you have day trips from Tokyo to Mount Fuji an Yokohama which are easily accessed by Japans expansive train system.

I think from observations an speaking to friends everyone seems to have concerns of the language but I have to admit not knowing
japanese didnt restrict my enjoyment whatsoever. Its always great to know the language of the country your visiting so that you
can hold conversations an chat with the locals to gain the "full experience".

But in Japan for example I couldnt find directions to a certain hostel
i was booked into so i asked a guy in a shop who had no english, after some funny looks between both of us he grabbed my arm an started walkin, about 10mins later we arrived outside the hostel an before i could say thankyou i saw him in the distance walking back to his shop.

As beautiful as the country is, an all the places i visited its the people ill remember most for been so kind, friendly an always laughing (yes i know they could have been just laughing at me).

I cant wait to go back someday hopefully soon

3. Posted by mikeb1986 (Budding Member 7 posts) 5y

I stayed for 4 months in Japan mostly in small towns. Nozawa Onsen a small ski resort still very "traditional" style village and Nanao where my girlfriend is from. Its a beutiful place and the people are great. A lot of the food is a very acquired taste (especially for someone who doesnt like fish) - but a lot of it is great. Look out for whale and (raw) horseand half cooked/onsen/raw eggs.

I found Tokyo was another city. it has shopping malls, trains and buses, its busy and smells of diesel. I did get to Asakusa though and it is nice there. Lots of people speak basic english and you can get by fine without any Japanese.

The best time I had was in the small towns. The contrast to Tokyo was unreal. The people were so kind and helpful even if they didnt speak english they would try to talk to me. I remember in an onsen one time 3 old guys talking to me through another local guy who spoke very simple English and then translated my answer to japanese for everyone else. Im not even sure he understood much of what I said

When local people offered me a beer or a meal, it wasnt to scam me into anything, it was because they wanted to speak to the foreigner. Kyoko explained most Japanese people learn to read and write English but never get oppotunity to speak english. The closest I came to being hassled by anyone was kids shouting "good morning" or staring at me - Kyoko explained they were saying to each other "look he has blue eyes"

What surprised me most was the lack of petty crime. Vending machines in the streets that dont get smashed or robbed (even in Tokyo city), I used to leave my backpack at the top of a chairlift and go riding all day, and it would still be there later, and my friend would send his 9 and 4-year old girls out to go for a bath at the onsen's at night.

4. Posted by mikeb1986 (Budding Member 7 posts) 5y

I stayed for 4 months in Japan mostly in small towns. Nozawa Onsen a small ski resort still very "traditional" style village and Nanao where my girlfriend is from. Its a beutiful place and the people are great. A lot of the food is a very acquired taste (especially for someone who doesnt like fish) - but a lot of it is great. Look out for whale and (raw) horseand half cooked/onsen/raw eggs.

I found Tokyo was another city. it has shopping malls, trains and buses, its busy and smells of diesel. I did get to Asakusa though and it is nice there. Lots of people speak basic english and you can get by fine without any Japanese.

The best time I had was in the small towns. The contrast to Tokyo was unreal. The people were so kind and helpful even if they didnt speak english they would try to talk to me. I remember in an onsen one time 3 old guys talking to me through another local guy who spoke very simple English and then translated my answer to japanese for everyone else. Im not even sure he understood much of what I said

When local people offered me a beer or a meal, it wasnt to scam me into anything, it was because they wanted to speak to the foreigner. Kyoko explained most Japanese people learn to read and write English but never get oppotunity to speak english. The closest I came to being hassled by anyone was kids shouting "good morning" or staring at me - Kyoko explained they were saying to each other "look he has blue eyes"

What surprised me most was the lack of petty crime. Vending machines in the streets that dont get smashed or robbed (even in Tokyo city), I used to leave my backpack at the top of a chairlift and go riding all day, and it would still be there later, and my friend would send his 9 and 4-year old girls out to go for a bath at the onsen's at night.

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