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Tipping Etiquette

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21. Posted by Peter (Admin 5813 posts) 11y

I guesss in Australia a 10% tip is pretty standard in restaurants these days, though you're certainly not obliged to give one. At cafes and such (where you can often have lunch), there's usually just a tipping jar for you to dump small change into (we have 2 dollar coins here). Rounding up is also very common. At the end of the day though, it depends very much on whether you enjoyed your service / food (tips are usually shared among the staff, including the kitchen staff).

I find the obligatory tipping system in America very scary. It's quite hard deciding who to tip and who not to tip. For instance, on board one United flight last year they were selling coffee, etc.. and I swear that when I bought a coffe the steward was expecting a tip! He sort of stood there taking his time giving me change (like he was hoping I would tell him to keep it). Well sorry, but air stewards aren't on $3 an hour and traditionally drinks are even free on non- "no frills" flights. Would you have tipped?

22. Posted by areinstein (Travel Guru 2788 posts) 11y

I have never seen a flight attendant getting tipped in the US and I travel at least 10 times a year within the US. That will be a first and yes, they get paid well for what they do. They dont need the tipping nor should you feel bad for not doing so. I honestly dont think I would have left a tip.

Although it is customary in the US to tip your typical 20% as I almost always do, I have left twice one penny (one cent of a dollar) as a tip. Obviously I did that just to make a point of how horrible the service was. Both times, my husband and I could tell the waitress was having a bad day but come on! not need to take it out on the patrons.

So for any of you non-american fellows and foreign visitors, if it is in fact customary to tip in the US, the tip also must be earned (since the wait stuff here knows THATS how they make their living). If you feel the service was so so, not so good, leave 10 percent. If you feel the service was terrible, absolutely terrible, dont leave anything at all. No one is going to chase you down the street and demand money from you. But since most waiters/waitresses work for those tips only, if the service was superb, yes leave the customary, scary, untypical 20 percent. ;)

23. Posted by daveh (Travel Guru 1027 posts) 11y

I have just read this on CNN. If you hate tipping, go to Cuba

"Resolution 10, issued by the Tourism Ministry, forbids employees -- from waiters to high-level executives -- from accepting tips, gifts and invitations from foreigners and demands that Cubans' contact with non-Cubans be restricted "to that which is absolutely necessary."

24. Posted by daveh (Travel Guru 1027 posts) 11y

I have just read this on CNN. If you hate tipping, go to Cuba

"Resolution 10, issued by the Tourism Ministry, forbids employees -- from waiters to high-level executives -- from accepting tips, gifts and invitations from foreigners and demands that Cubans' contact with non-Cubans be restricted "to that which is absolutely necessary."

25. Posted by DavidBUK (First Time Poster 1 posts) 11y

Whatever CNN may say, Resolution 10 in Cuba does not prevent or deter tipping in Cuba. Tourist workers - especially waiters and porters - all over the world depend on tips from satisfied customers to make up their small wages to make a decent income. Resolution 10 is not directed at tourist workers in Cuban hotels and resorts. It is addressed to Cuban officials and diplomats who travel abroad on business, and is a code of conduct, ethics and professional standards to prevent corruption and personal gain from official trips overseas. It has nothing to say about toursm workers at home in Cuba. The "gifts" that Resolution 10 refers to are not "tips" but potential bribes for securing business from rich countries, and Resolution 10 advises officials not to be seduced by lavish entertainment on business trips which may exceed what they are used to while doing business in Cuba.
Read the text of the Resolution and do not be misled by CNN's headlines.

26. Posted by hielmann (Full Member 31 posts) 11y

We do not have a tipping culture in Malaysia..

"If you want to give, you give , if you dont want to give, dont give"

27. Posted by larondey (Full Member 105 posts) 10y

I had lunch yesterday with my Mom...

Bill: $51.27
Tip: $8.73 (17.2%)
Total: $60.00

I usually just like to leave a whole dollar amount that's at least 15% if the service is at least "pretty good". If the service is horrible, I'll give 10%.

Funny story though... I was in Japan last May and went out to eat at a Chinese restaurant in Kobe. My friends and I were working out the bill and putting coins on the table to pay with. I left 2 yen on the table by accident (knowing a tip is almost insulting to Japanese waiters) - he ran out of the restaurant and gave me my 2 yen back! It'd be nice if American waitstaff got paid as nicely as the Japanese!

28. Posted by maba (Inactive 227 posts) 10y

Peter's on the Australian way is 'spot on' (very accurate). We are a bit more relaxed about tipping here so when you visitors from O/S come over to Oz, .. don't-tip-too-much otherwise we will be expected to do it too. Everything in moderation, none of this 20%. I would prefer if the venue or tour put 10% on the bill and no-one tips.

We've already been fore-warned that we are expected to tip our TD & driver on our next trip!. In China we paid all the Tips to the TD up front (a fixed ammount each) & he dispursed the gratuities accordingly!! Well, we saw him hand over envelopes to drivers & local guides.

All workers should be paid what they are worth and not rely on Tips.
You may sense that I am very uncomfortable with mandatory tipping.

Here is a good tip - be nice to your mother...

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