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International women’s day

Travel Forums Off Topic International women’s day

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1. Posted by ukmassage (Inactive 1052 posts) 11y

did you celebrate it?

In some countries it's a public holiday - is it in the country you live in?

http://www.internationalwomensday.com/about.asp

2. Posted by tway (Travel Guru 7273 posts) 11y

I got a chocolate bunny! Woo hoo!

3. Posted by Sam I Am (Admin 5588 posts) 11y

I cooked for my wife; she reminded me this morning I'd better :)

She also went to some womens conference which she thought was lousy but it's the thought that counts I guess

4. Posted by akemi (Budding Member 5 posts) 11y

I never even heard of it, where did it derive from? Is it like making up for the olden days when women weren't allowed to do Anything, down to things as obscure as simply reading poetry...?

5. Posted by ukmassage (Inactive 1052 posts) 11y

check the website for history - or google for some other sites.

you have a very romantic few of women's past - the reality was really more down to earth

6. Posted by Zhou (Full Member 126 posts) 11y

Our company bought all girls the tickets to the planetarium, so I watched 4D movies such as Escaping from the Dinosaur Island and the Secrets of the Universe for a whole afternoon.

7. Posted by james (Travel Guru 4136 posts) 11y

I wonder how they celebrated in Islamic countries, but then I wonder if Western feminists could give a stuff.

8. Posted by Wenzel (Budding Member 38 posts) 11y

is there an international man's day

9. Posted by ukmassage (Inactive 1052 posts) 11y

no, but there is Fathers Day

10. Posted by Cupcake (Travel Guru 8468 posts) 11y

Chinese Rice Cookers: Women's Day Gift from Castro

Wed Mar 9,12:46 PM

HAVANA (Reuters) - President Fidel Castro (news - web sites) gave Cuban women some good news on International Women's Day: rice cookers are coming to every household.

In a five-hour 45-minute speech to cheering women on Tuesday night, the Cuban leader announced 100,000 pressure cookers and rice cookers would be available each month at subsidized prices.

"Those of you who like rice cookers, raise your hands," Castro said to applause from hundreds of women. The 78-year-old leader spent two hours talking about the merits of pressure cookers.

Castro's gesture may have carried some irony, coming on a day commemorating women's battles for equality. But many Cuban women, who do the vast majority of domestic work despite advances toward equality under Castro, were only too happy to hear the Chinese-made rice cookers were on their way.

The electric rice cooker is a treasured appliance in communist-run Cuba, where the basic diet is black beans and rice. The cookers were among appliances banned to save energy a decade ago when Cuba was plunged into economic crisis and power outages due to the loss of Soviet aid and oil.

The cookers could be distributed now, Castro said, because Cuba was emerging from the crisis and had resolved its latest energy crunch, caused by a failure of the island's largest power plant last summer.

With average salaries of $12 a month, most Cubans cannot afford rice cookers that now sell for $60 on the black market.

"They will be received with open arms. When the gas goes, you can make beans, boil vegetables or heat up milk for the baby," said a Cuban housewife.

She said electric rice cookers are vital in rural Cuba, where households cook on wood or coal fires when gas is not available.