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Is There Much Anti-American Sentiment in Germany?

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21. Posted by Brendan (Respected Member 1824 posts) 11y

ah I posted that last one too soon! Me want edit button

22. Posted by Timothy (Budding Member 20 posts) 11y

Quoting Brendan

Did you read any of the other responses you have gotten?

Yes, I have read them all. I always dispense with trolls first - I didn't expect to find them on a travel forum. ;)

23. Posted by Timothy (Budding Member 20 posts) 11y

Quoting Brendan

ah I posted that last one too soon! Me want edit button

Don't worry about it.

24. Posted by Timothy (Budding Member 20 posts) 11y

Quoting Brendan

Quoting Timothy

Please do not turn this into a US bashing thread. I asked a legitimate question. If you would like to answer, I will gladly read your reply.

I apologise for the laughter at the bush comment. It couldn't be helped. In regards to your original question. Every country around the world has different feelings and problems with other nations.

So with that, I would say that unless those feelings and problems are going to get your killed, to go and have a good time! :)

And I do not really agree with the "dress" like a Canadian abroad. Everyone should have some pride of where they come from and shine a positive light on their country instead of masking it.

Of course the idea of "my nation is better than your nation" resulting in hate-mongering really bothers me to no end.

On another note: I don't know if other Canadians have found it this way - but most people I run into count Canada as the 52nd state of the United States.

"Canada is America" they would say... I would try to convince them otherwise but it made no difference.

I was not aware that Canada and the US were confused in people's minds to that extent. That isn't true in Britain (at least, in my experience). I grew up in the northeastern US and lived for many years in New England - there has always been a strong relationship with the maritimes (beautiful place, IMHO) and i had felt a close kinship with Canadians than with, say Californians. With the current political climate, that is not quite as true, but the roots are very deep.

Once again, dislike would never keep me away, but it's good to be prepared. My friends who were insulted in Switzerland really did have a difficult time. They are gracious, polite and have a long history of European contacts - so the shock of the experience was considerable.

Thank you for your comments.

25. Posted by Timothy (Budding Member 20 posts) 11y

Quoting nieck

[quote]Hi there,
I won't promise anything to you, but Americans still have a high status here in Germany - over all. The problem is the current administration, but usually the folks here are able to differentiate between individual and political representative.
I'd say that Bush, Jr. was (and still is) the one of the least welcome persons in most parts of Europe. That's one reason why they shut down the whole region when he came to visit. There where demonstrations against Bush as a person and (especially) against the totally overdone security - even people who lived anywhere near the route or a place that Bush might have gone through had to be escorted out of the security zone by a policeman - thats too much. A lot of people had the oppinion that this was a totally paranoid situation and that it affected far too many people's lives that day.

Thank you for your comments. That situation in Maiz really did receive a lot of negative publicity. I follow the news from Europe closely, and this was a surprise. I know Bush is hated - but this seemed a little extreme.

A reason why Americans might be looked at strange is their habits. Americans behave very diffently than Germans. Often Americans talk VERY loudly. Americans are proud and often wear their flag on t-shirts that read "proud to be an American".

Well, maybe you don't always notice the reserved Americans because we don't draw attention to ourselves. And I have never worn a flag saying "proud to be an American". I am a businessman, so it is unlikely that I will be doing that any time soon.

(Do you really know that many Americans who dress like that?)

Germans usually won't tell you that they are proud to be German because of our very problematic history. Thus the understanding that people might be very proud of their country has been lost. The people who will openly tell you that they are proud to be German are often (but not exclusively!) those with reactionary political interests.

Yes, i am quite familiar with German history and the current climate. We have close German friends - I love them like family - and they say exactly what you do here.

Some Americans come to Germany and eat at McDonalds. This is strange. Get a Bratwurst or a Döner (Turkish Fast-Food developed and sold in Germany by our Turkish Imigrants - very good and not as unhealthy as fries!) if you need something to chew on on the way. Try something new and try to find out whats life like in Germany. If you come as a tourist that's fine, but don't behave as if you where at home. That's true for all tourist. I have made this mistake before too.

Yes, that is what I plan to do.

A good way to fine out about people in their culture is to observe them. Don't follow them around though ;)
If you're on public transport you might want to just shut your mouth for a while and not talk to your buddy. Just look around and try to catch the situation.

I always do that - not all Americans talk constantly.

A good way to find out about a place is to take a tourist guide and a map. Look in the tourist guide and cross out all places recommended on your map. Go to those places that are not mentioned.
In your case you want to see the Frauenkirche. That alright - you come to see it, but you will have time to see something else as well. Just don't go to every place that's a so called 'must see'. You won't appreciate looking at the pictures on your computer/colorprints as much as if you can tell your friends at home a story about a really great situation that you got in with the people in Dresden.

We will be staying part of the time with German friends, so that will make it much better. I have studied the Frauenkirche for many years, and followed the rebuilding of the city of Dresden. We do plan to spend time elsewhere.

I was in Paris last year with a friend and we found the Indian quarter. It wasn't on a single map that we had. And there was not a single word about it in the tourist guide. We just bumped in when we decided to wander around the city at places where we don't see any other tourists. We had the strangest and most interesting time in Paris there. We didn't take pictures, there are only memories, but that's even better.

Well, I hope I could help you with your question. If you need more info just send me a PM.

Greetings from Hamburg.
Nils

Thank you Nils for your helpful comments. I appreciate your willingness to take the time to answer them.

26. Posted by nieck (Full Member 24 posts) 11y

No problem,
I have spent a year in the US as an exchange student - and I have met lots of Americans that are not as loud. But I must say that it's still not very hard to identify an American as such - even in another environment. Or let's say: there are enough to notice some.
And yes, I have seen lots of Americans wearing t-shirts like those in Europe. I personally have not a problem with that because I know about the values Americans (not all of course) often associate with it. It just seems strange, because they make themselves outsiders by the first look. Enough of that.

I think it's really sad that your friends have experienced such ignorance. These people who offended your friend ain't better than the people they think they dispair. I hope that you or anyone else will not experience this here in Germany because I am very certain that most of the people here have learned from our history - that's my patriotism. Not all though, and saxony (of which Dresden is the capitol) has an open problem with reactionary powers. Some other places as well. And yet other places have the same problem, but neglect to deal with it. Sad but true. Everyone will be safe in the streets though. At nearly all times and places.

Aight. I hope you enjoy your visit to Dresden. But as you are staying with friends I have no doubt you will.

Greetings, Nils

27. Posted by IAMNOBODY (Budding Member 31 posts) 11y

Attn: Timothy

I do not understand why you are directly so much animosity towards me. I attempted to address your initial comment in a positive way. I did make light of the fact that many Americans have traveled as Canadians to avoid problems. Your response to my attempt at humour was rude and I responded in kind.

I have no issue with America or Americans, however if negative comments or perceived negative comments are made against Canada and Canadians, do not expect me to keep my mouth shut.

I apologize if I have offended you, it was not my intent. I hope you have a safe and hassle free trip to Deutschland.

28. Posted by nieck (Full Member 24 posts) 11y

Oh, and I forgot:

I don't think Bush is hated. He's just very much disliked for the way he acts and the decisions he took. Hatred is something else. Hatred is just like Love, only the other way around. It doesn't ask any questions of why and who and what for.

I think Bush should have seen the demonstrants himself and it's sad that the media in the US puts it in a negative context against the USA and/or their inhabitants. The American people aren't the problem and in my opinion even the reasons they have elected Bush for is not the problem - as I have followed the elections in 2000 and 2004. Bush, Rice, Cheaney, Rumsfeld and Wolfowitz are the problem - and in general not even they are: their foreign policies are. We don't care about what they do in the US. That's not our business. But we do care what they do outside of the US and how they simply ignore everyone else and display it to their own public as if they had the right to do so.

My interpretation of the War on Iraq is that the average American thinks that it's the right thing to help the Iraqii people. It is! But the interests of the Administration are much more than that. If they were there had been action in Liberia last year and there would be action in Dafour (Sudan) now - just to name to conflicts that are much more crutial (measured in lives at immediate threat) than Iraq.
In my eyes we (Europeans) are guilty that we don't take more action than some talking there right now.

Well, enough for today and this was really far off the original topic...
Nils

29. Posted by Brendan (Respected Member 1824 posts) 11y

Quoting nieck

The American people aren't the problem and in my opinion even the reasons they have elected Bush for is not the problem - as I have followed the elections in 2000 and 2004. Bush, Rice, Cheaney, Rumsfeld and Wolfowitz are the problem - and in general not even they are: their foreign policies are.

I know that people like to shy away from politics, ESPECIALLY on public forums such as this. One must ask though - if we can not talk about politics even in the borderless world of the internet where can we?

That said I just want to make a couple points about your comments nieck. You mention that it is not the people of the United States, but the administration, and more specifically - that administrations policies. I ask - how so?

From what I read on the news - it was close race - with about 52% voting for the Bush administration? (give or take.. who's couting? ). In other words over 50% of the voting population are in favour of the Bush administration; Its people and the policies that go along with them. At what point do the people of a nation become accountable? 60% 70%?

Here is a quote from the play "An Enemy of The People", I think it fits the current state the world is in.

Quoting Henrik Ibsen: An Enemy of The People

The majority never has right on its side. Never, I say!
That is one of these social lies against which an independent,
intelligent man must wage war. Who is it that constitute the majority of the population in a country? Is it the
clever folk, or the stupid? I don't imagine you will dispute the
fact that at present the stupid people are in an absolutely
overwhelming majority all the world over. But, good Lord!--you
can never pretend that it is right that the stupid folk should
govern the clever ones I (Uproar and cries.) Oh, yes--you can
shout me down, I know! But you cannot answer me. The majority has
might on its side--unfortunately; but right it has not. I am in
the right--I and a few other scattered individuals. The minority
is always in the right.

Maybe I should have started a new topic?

30. Posted by Timothy (Budding Member 20 posts) 11y

Quoting Das-FX

Attn: Timothy

I do not understand why you are directly so much animosity towards me. I attempted to address your initial comment in a positive way. I did make light of the fact that many Americans have traveled as Canadians to avoid problems. Your response to my attempt at humour was rude and I responded in kind.

I have no issue with America or Americans, however if negative comments or perceived negative comments are made against Canada and Canadians, do not expect me to keep my mouth shut.

I apologize if I have offended you, it was not my intent. I hope you have a safe and hassle free trip to Deutschland.

Negative comments about Canada? I posted this topic because I wanted to talk about Germany. At first, I found jokes from Canadians about Americans "dressing up" as Canadians. They were not deeply offensive - just irrelevant. I responded in kind. You perceived that as being rude. It's better to stop at this point and just let it alone.