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Safe to travel in Tibet?

Travel Forums Asia Safe to travel in Tibet?

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1. Posted by Henni (Budding Member 3 posts) 11y

Have you heard about the latest independence struggle between Tibet and China? Is it safe to travel there right now? Any good tips? Thanx Henni

2. Posted by s0f (Full Member 163 posts) 11y

I'd be interested in this too. Am soooooooo keen to go to Lhasa...

3. Posted by csfreixo (Full Member 83 posts) 11y

hi,

i'm a brazilian traveller in Lhasa right now. I came today from Ktm by overland tour passing thru Everest Base Camp (it took 5 days). I haven't heard anything about this. The situation here is absolutely normal (considering 'normal' for an occupied country)...

cheers

4. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

Quoting Henni

Have you heard about the latest independence struggle between Tibet and China? Is it safe to travel there right now? Any good tips? Thanx Henni

Oh come on! Be serious ! There is a "One China Policy" in place
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China had its annual national government meeting last weekend. There has been anti-secession laws passed to prevent any insurgent activity in Taiwan.
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President Hu Jintao is not only China's leader, but also the Communist Party leader, and now the nation's military leader. The Party has clearly stated that it will take whatever action (military or non-military) to preserve territorial sovereignty, and the integrity of the "One China Policy".
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No matter what anyone wants to say, Tibet has been a part of China for over 50 years. Tibet itself is Chinese in appearance & nature.
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Which armies are going to march over the Himalayan Mountains, suffer altitude sickness, and freeze to death to basically claim a barren wasteland?
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Or is there some other nation that wants to declare on China?

5. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

Declare WAR on China?

6. Posted by mim (Travel Guru 1276 posts) 11y

woah there wocca


Which armies are going to march over the Himalayan Mountains, suffer altitude sickness, and freeze to death to basically claim a barren wasteland?

a barren wasteland??

And is that all that matters? who wants to claim it? what about independance and the Tibetans right to rule themselves?
I know the Chinese government has done a good fair bit for Tibet but occupation is occupation.

?

7. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

Quoting mim

woah there wocca


Which armies are going to march over the Himalayan Mountains, suffer altitude sickness, and freeze to death to basically claim a barren wasteland?

a barren wasteland??

And is that all that matters? who wants to claim it? what about independance and the Tibetans right to rule themselves?
I know the Chinese government has done a good fair bit for Tibet but occupation is occupation.

?

Occupation is occupation ... just like America occupying The Philippines for 100 years; just like the variuous parts of the world the England has occupied in the past (such as India, Malaysia, Australia).
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Have you ever been to Tibet?
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Check this website for pix I've recently uploaded:

http://community.travelchinaguide.com/m.asp?u=wocca

What do you really know about the Chinese government or China itself? Take a clear view from the inside rather than hearsay from outside.

8. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

Quoting csfreixo

hi,

i'm a brazilian traveller in Lhasa right now. I came today from Ktm by overland tour passing thru Everest Base Camp (it took 5 days). I haven't heard anything about this. The situation here is absolutely normal (considering 'normal' for an occupied country)...

cheers

woah there The Cold War is over !

Quoting China Daily Newspaper

Dalai Lama Urged To Give Up Tibet Independence (Xinhua)Updated: 2004-05-23 15:16)

(quote)"... China issued Sunday a white paper to acquaint the world with its ethnic policy and the truth about Tibet, and urged the Dalai Lama to "truly relinquish" his stand for "Tibet independence."

"The Central Government's policy as regards the Dalai Lama is consistent and clear. It is hoped that the Dalai Lama will look reality in the face, make a correct judgment of the situation, truly relinquish his stand for 'Tibet independence,' and do something beneficial to the progress of China and the region of Tibet in his remaining years," says the white paper, titled Regional Ethnic Autonomy in Tibet.

The 30-page white paper, released by the Information Office of the State Council, or the cabinet, is the first of its kind to focus on the "regional ethnic autonomy" policy long practiced in China's ethnic minority regions, as well as the substantial benefits this policy has brought to Tibet, which formally became one of China's five province-level autonomous regions in 1965.

"... (sic) The regional ethnic autonomy in Tibet the Dalai clique attacks is the very regional ethnic autonomy for Tibet which the 14th Dalai supported and whose preparation he was involved in," says the paper, citing the fact that the Dalai Lama was the chairman of the Preparatory Committee for the Tibet Autonomous Region when the committee was established in 1956.

"The Dalai's attack against the regional ethnic autonomy in Tibet runs counter not only to the reality of present-day Tibet but also to the words he once uttered in all seriousness (sic) ..."

"Any act aimed at undermining and changing the regional ethnic autonomy in Tibet is in violation of the Constitution and law, and it is unacceptable to the entire Chinese people, including the broad masses of the Tibetan people," the paper stresses.

It goes on to point out that the local government of Tibet headed by the Dalai Lama representing feudal serfdom under theocracy has long since been replaced by the democratic administration established by the Tibetan people themselves.

"The destiny and future of Tibet can no longer be decided by the Dalai Lama and his clique. Rather, it can only be decided by the whole Chinese nation, including the Tibetan people," says the paper. "This is an objective political fact in Tibet that cannot be denied or shaken."

The Dalai Lama fled China in 1959 after a failed armed rebellion aimed at separating Tibet from China. The rebellion was staged by "some people in the upper ruling strata of Tibet" "in order to preserve feudal serfdom," with the support of "imperialist forces," says the white paper.

After leading the Tibetan people to "quickly quell the rebellion," the central government implemented the Democratic Reform which overthrew the feudal serfdom under theocracy, abolished the feudal hierarchic system and emancipated a million serfs and slaves. "The Democratic Reform cleared the way for regional ethnic autonomy in Tibet," says the paper.

The paper notes that under the reign of the Dalai Lama, "even in the first half of the 20th century, Tibet remained a society ... even darker and more backward than medieval Europe." But after nearly 40 years of practice of regional ethnic autonomy, Tibet has "recorded rapid economic growth and all-round social progress," and the Tibetans have "become the creators and beneficiaries of the material and cultural wealth of Tibetan society."

"Historical facts indicate that the institution of regional ethnic autonomy in Tibet was the natural result of social progress in Tibet, and that it accords with the fundamental interests of the Tibetan people and the inexorable law of development of human society," the paper says...."

http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/english/doc/2004-05/23/content_333019.htm

9. Posted by areinstein (Travel Guru 2788 posts) 11y

W, thanks for the insightful article. I have become a more knowledgeable person today...

10. Posted by Wocca (Inactive 3745 posts) 11y

Quoting areinstein

W, thanks for the insightful article. I have become a more knowledgeable person today...

I also travelled overland from Nepal to Lhasa. There were 17 people on the tour. All but one person came with an open mind. The rest of us were quite amused at the bold, ill-informed statements that he came out with, which he had no hope of proving or justifying.I think he was also desperate to marry a bar girl in Kathmandu. She was about 20 years younger than him.

To help him out with his moral dilemmas, I bought him a small prayer wheel from the street market in Lhasa. He had to be shown how to use it. When he first saw some Tibetans prostrating in a temple, he did the same. A retired German man commented to me, "He's not even a Buddhist!".

Some else on the tour seemed to have heard from somewhere that China buries its muclear waste in Tibet. I haven't met anyone since that's heard the same.