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1. Posted by GaryMLeader (Budding Member, 11 posts) 27 Mar '13 04:21

Hi guys,

So my friend and I will be heading to Louisiana from Tennessee on the 27th April. We're not sure how long we want to spend there...can anyone please recommend some places to see around the state!? I know for defo that we will be in New Orleans from 27th April for a few days...but that's it atm!

Cheers.

G

2. Posted by Calcruzer (Moderator, 1839 posts) 28 Mar '13 20:39

Visit the old cotton plantations out near Natchez--then head on over to New Orleans--those are the only real highlights. But New Orleans is a highlight--especially their culinary delicacies.

3. Posted by Calcruzer (Moderator, 1839 posts) 6 Apr '13 07:53

Here is an article on the NBC website that gives some details about the changes going on in the New Orleans restaurant scene. One of the most interesting comments on here to me is that there have been over 500 new restaurants opened in New Orleans since Hurricane Katrina hit the city in 2005.

http://bites.today.com/_news/2013/04/05/17601103-new-orleans-chefs-give-traditional-cuisine-an-updated-makeover?lite

4. Posted by Calcruzer (Moderator, 1839 posts) 7 Apr '13 21:26

I also just noticed that "Saveur" magazine--a well-respected culinary monthly magazine focuses this month on New Orleans. The title of their feature article, which shows what they think of New Orleans' food is "14 recipes from the Best Food City in the Nation".

They highlight recipes from some of New Orleans' best restaurants, including Brennan's, Galatoire's, Antoine's, Arnaud's, Tujague's, Commander's Palace, Cafe du Monde, Bon Ton Cafe, Tommy's Cuisine, and others.

They also explain the difference between Creole and Cajun cuisines--the town's two favorites as follows (a summary, not a direct quote):

Creole food is classically French, but it borrows from all of the city's residents, be they Native American, African, Spanish, or Caribbean. Cajun, on the other hand, is also French-based, but primarily founded on one-pot cooking and rustic ingredients brought from the rural Arcadians (Catholic French, who lived originally in Nova Scotia, but were forced out of Canada by the British and moved to the outskirts of New Orleans) and which didn't become familiar to city folks until Paul Prudomme (owner of K-Paul's) and other Arcadian chefs made them popular in the mid-1970s.

Both cooking styles are great--but it should be noted that it is hard to find Creole restaurants outside of New Orleans because the dishes are more complex and difficult to cook, whereas Cajun food can be found thoughout the US--probably both because it is easier to cook and also because it is the more popular of the two.

[ Edit: Edited on 07-Apr-2013, at 21:57 by Calcruzer ]

5. Posted by GaryMLeader (Budding Member, 11 posts) 11 Apr '13 03:39

Thanks for all that information Calcruzer...Its much appreciated, We cannot wait to hit New Orleans to indulge ourselves in all the culinary delicacies. The food sounds absolutely sensational. I really want to try the Creole...that sounds great!

6. Posted by zebezoe (First Time Poster, 1 posts) 22 Apr '13 11:57

You're going to be there during the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival!! Check that out- it's a great chance to hear incredible music, eat amazing food, and meet tons of friendly locals all at once!

-snip-

[ Edit: Sorry, no promos please. ]

7. Posted by Yellbell (Budding Member, 5 posts) 24 Apr '13 00:09

The area of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park has many tourist attractions in Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge that you could check out if you want to see the nature side of that beautiful state. Yeah, the New Orleans Jazz Festival is something that you should have your camera battery fully charged for too.