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Adjara

Travel Guide Europe Georgia Adjara

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Introduction

Adjara, officially known as the Autonomous Republic of Adjara, is an historical, geographic and political-administrative region of Georgia. Located in the country's southwestern corner, Adjara lies on the coast of the Black Sea near the foot of the Lesser Caucasus Mountains, north of Turkey. It is an important tourism destination and includes Georgia's second-largest city of Batumi as its capital. About 350,000 people live on its 2,880 square kilometres.

Adjara is home to the Adjarians, a regional subgroup of Georgians. Adjara's name can be spelled in a number of ways, including Ajara, Ajaria, Adjaria, Adzharia, and Achara, among others. Under the Soviet Union, Adjara was part of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic as the Adjarian ASSR.

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Geography

Adjara is located on the southeastern coast of the Black Sea and extends into the wooded foothills and mountains of the Lesser Caucasus. It has borders with the region of Guria to the north, Samtskhe-Javakheti to the east and Turkey to the south. Most of Adjara's territory either consists of hills or mountains. The highest mountains rise more than 3,000 metres above sea level. Around 60% of Adjara is covered by forests. Many parts of the Meskheti Range (the west-facing slopes) are covered by temperate rain forests.

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Cities

  • Batumi - capital and largest city

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Events and Festivals

Black Sea Jazz Festival

Traditionally in the mid July Batumi hosts the Black sea Jazz festival organized by Eastern Promotion. The six-day jazz event offers a tasteful music to the admirers of jazz all around the world. 4 stages, 21 bands, 37 shows and participants from 11 countries make Batumi the centre of summer vacation.

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Weather

Adjara is well known for its humid climate (especially along the coastal regions) and prolonged rainy weather, although there is plentiful sunshine during the spring and summer months. Adjara receives the highest amounts of precipitation both in Georgia and in the Caucasus. It is also one of the wettest temperate regions in the northern hemisphere. No region along Adjara's coast receives less than 2,200 mm of precipitation per year. The west-facing (windward) slopes of the Meskheti Range receive upwards of 4,500 mm of precipitation per year. The coastal lowlands receive most of the precipitation in the form of rain (due to the area's subtropical climate). September and October are usually the wettest months. Batumi's average monthly rainfall for the month of September is 410 mm. The interior parts of Adjara are considerably drier than the coastal mountains and lowlands. Winter usually brings significant snowfall to the higher regions of Adjara, where snowfall often reaches several meters. Average summer temperatures are between 22-24 °C in the lowland areas and 17-21 °C in the highlands. The highest areas of Adjara have lower temperatures. Average winter temperatures are between 4-6 °C along the coast while the interior areas and mountains average belove zero. Some of the highest mountains of Adjara have average winter temperatures of -8 °C degrees Celsius.

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Getting There

By Plane

Batumi International Airport (BUS) offers flights to/from Kiev, Ankara, Minsk, Baku, Donetsk, Kharkov, Moscow, Odessa, Tbilisi, Tel Aviv, Tehran and Istanbul.

By Train

Regular trains connect Batumi with other cities in the country, including Gori and Tbilisi. The small train station is a short taxi ride from the centre.

By Bus

Buses and minibuses (marshutkas) operate regularly between Batumi and Tbilisi, taking around 6 hours.

By Boat

A new ferry operates between Sochi, Russia to Batumi, Georgia. It is a high speed hydrofoil which operates three times a week, Wednesdays at 10:30am, Fridays at 9:30am, Sundays at 10:30am. Check the port of Sochi for more information about those crossings.

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This is version 4. Last edited at 12:48 on Jul 15, 16 by Utrecht. 2 articles link to this page.

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