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Appalachian Mountains

Photo © BlueWat

Travel Guide North America Appalachian Mountains

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Introduction

Day 39 - NH Fall Foliage

Day 39 - NH Fall Foliage

© All Rights Reserved jl98584

The Appalachian Mountains stretch from Alabama in southern USA through to Canada's Newfoundland and Labrador, running parallel to the continent's eastern coastline. Definitions vary on the precise boundaries of the Appalachians. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) defines the Appalachian Highlands physiographic division as consisting of thirteen provinces: the Atlantic Coast Uplands, Eastern Newfoundland Atlantic, Maritime Acadian Highlands, Maritime Plain, Notre Dame and M├ęgantic Mountains, Western Newfoundland Mountains, Piedmont, Blue Ridge, Valley and Ridge, Saint Lawrence Valley, Appalachian Plateaus, New England province, and the Adirondack provinces. A common variant definition does not include the Adirondack Mountains, which geologically belong to the Grenville Orogeny and have a different geological history from the rest of the Appalachians.

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Geography

The range is mostly in the United States (U.S.) but extends into southeastern Canada, forming a zone from 160 to 480 kilometres wide, running from the island of Newfoundland 2,400 kilometres southwestward to Central Alabama in the United States.[discuss] The range covers parts of the islands of Saint Pierre and Miquelon, which comprise an overseas territory of France. The system is divided into a series of ranges, with the individual mountains averaging around 910 metres. The highest of the group is Mount Mitchell in North Carolina at 2,037 metres, which is the highest point in the United States east of the Mississippi River.

The term Appalachian refers to several different regions associated with the mountain range. Most broadly, it refers to the entire mountain range with its surrounding hills and the dissected plateau region. The term is often used more restrictively to refer to regions in the central and southern Appalachian Mountains, usually including areas in the states of Kentucky, Tennessee, Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, and North Carolina, as well as sometimes extending as far south as northern Alabama, Georgia and western South Carolina, and as far north as Pennsylvania, southern Ohio and parts of southern upstate New York.

The Ouachita Mountains in Arkansas and Oklahoma were originally part of the Appalachians as well, but became disconnected through geologic history.

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Sights and Activities

  • Appalachian Trail - over two million people a year hike a portion of this extensive trail running from Georgia to Maine.

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Eat/Drink

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Contributors

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This is version 8. Last edited at 14:45 on Aug 3, 17 by Utrecht. 2 articles link to this page.

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