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Bay of Fundy

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Travel Guide North America Canada Bay of Fundy

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Introduction

Swallowtail Lighthouse

Swallowtail Lighthouse

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The Bay of Fundy is home to the highest tides in the world, rising over 15 metres. The Bay of Fundy is a diverse ecosystem consisting of approximately 8 species of whale, porpoises, seabirds, seals and other marine animals. Whether it is a day of whale watching, ocean kayaking or a sometime spent on a beach. The Bay of Fundy can offer something to all nature lovers.

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Sights and Activities

  • Whale Watching - The Bay of Fundy is home to 8 types of Marine Mammals, including the rare North Atlantic right whale. A whale watching tour will provide an opportunity to see some of these.
  • The Hopewell Rocks - located 47 kilometers west of Moncton, New Brunswick are gigantic sandstone sculpture that have been formed by the tide over the years. Some famous sculptures are the flowerpot or Lover's Arch.

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Weather

The weather is similar to other areas of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Maine. However, The Bay of Fundy is a large body of water that usually has a strong wind coming to shore. This makes the areas directly around and near The Bay of Fundy a little bit cooler than other areas. Even in summer it is advisable to bring a raincoat, sweater and long pants for any activities on The Bay of Fundy.

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Getting There and Around

The Bay of Fundy is accessible from many parts of Nova Scotia, the southern part of New Brunswick and parts of Maine.

Most visitors arrive by driving the Trans-Canada Highway (which leads from Edmundston through Fredericton and Moncton), perhaps stopping to see attractions like the World's Largest Axe, the World's Longest Covered Bridge, the sunrise over the Saint John river valley and Magnetic Hill on the outskirts of Moncton.

Other options include intercity bus service to Saint John (although it does not reach smaller towns in the region) and an automobile/passenger ferry from Saint John to Digby.

Most get around by private motorcar. As the region is relatively hilly, bicycle lanes are still limited, but one can bicycle around the region. The flat upper region of the bay is especially suited to this, and in places one can follow the Trans-Canada Trail.

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Eat

The area is known for its seafood, especially lobster, but you will also find other regional foods. The picturesque village of Alma on the east side of Fundy National Park, is a vibrant active lobster harbour, and boasts three different lobster shops. You can also dine at the hotel in town, and eat seafood while overlooking the harbour. Digby, on the Nova Scotia side of the bay, is known as the scallop capital of the world. Fiddlehead greens are a delicacy in the spring, and in late winter maple foods are common especially in the upper half of the bay.

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Safety

Whenever you are involved in any activity in The Bay of Fundy it is essential that you know the tide schedule and keep a close eye on the tides. In The Bay of Fundy the tide seems to come in and go out faster than other places. This can be disorienting for new visitors to the area. If you are not paying attention it is very easy to have your exit from the beach blocked by the incoming tide. This is an extremely dangerous situation that in the past has caused people to be evacuated or worse.

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This is version 12. Last edited at 8:48 on Aug 4, 17 by Utrecht. 7 articles link to this page.

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