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Chichicastenango

Travel Guide Central America Guatemala Chichicastenango

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Introduction

Chichicastenango or "Chichi" as it's known locally is an incredibly atmospheric little market town set up high on the mountains (around 2,000 metres) around 2 hours/140 kilometres from Guatemala City. Famous for its colourful indigenous market held every Thursday and Sunday, it's really worth a visit to soak up some of the local K'iche' Maya culture and customs and marvel at the stunningly beautiful traditional native costumes and textiles.If you can,visit this magical little place on a Sunday as the cofradias (Mayan religious brotherhoods)
often hold processions,chanting and burning incense, around the narrow,cobbled streets of the church of Santo Tomas and inside the church itself.

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Sights and Activities

The church of Santo Tomas dating from 1540 is a fascinating mixture of Catholic and Mayan religious practices.

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Events and Festivals

The Festival of Saint Thomas just before Christmas takes place in quite a dream like an other-wordly atmosphere. A lot of alcohol is consumed! It's a riotous, vibrant festival where the highland Indians pour into Chichi to celebrate with music and dance. Firecrackers, the sound of drums, incense wafting around the atmospheric, winding streets and effigies of patron saints being paraded around make for a really special and intense experience.

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Getting There

By Bus

Buses and shuttles travel to Guatemala City and Antigua daily. On market days you can get a shuttle bus from Panajachel on Lake Atitlan (37 kilometres, takes 1.5 hours).

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Sleep

PropertyAddressTypePopularity

Budget

  • Posada el Arco - A good budget choice and in a central location.

Upscale

  • Mayan Inn - A lovely old inn and probably the best hotel in town to soak up a truly authentic Guatemalan experience.

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Keep Connected

Internet

Internet access is widely available. Even most of the more remote areas have some type of internet access available. Many larger areas also have WiFi. All of the Camperos chicken/pizza restaurants (which are numerous) offer free WiFi, as well as many other restaurants and cafes. Some hotels may also offer computer banks with internet access. Just ask and you eventually will find some sort of free access.

If you have a smartphone such as iPhone, Google Android, you just need a local SIM card (roughly Q25) and can start enjoying the prepaid access plans, which generally come in lots of an hour, a day, or a week.

Phone

See also International Telephone Calls

Guatemala's emergency phone numbers include 110 (police), 120 (ambulance) and 123 (fire). Guatemala's international calling code is 502. There are no area codes. Phone numbers all have eight digits.

The phone system isn't great, but it works. Tourists can call abroad from call centers, where you pay by the minute. It is also easy to purchase a calling card to use at public pay phones. The phones there do not accept money, so to use a public phone on the street you must purchase a telephone card. Typically, the cost is around 8 quetzals for a 10-min call to North America, and slightly more to Europe. Cell phones are quite cheap and calling overseas through one can get as low as $0.08 a min. If you are planning to stay for a while and plan to use the phone, you should consider buying a cheap prepaid phone. Wireless nation-wide internet access for laptops is also available as a service from some companies. Telefónica has good coverage with their PCMCIA EV-DO cards.

Post

El Correo is the national postal company in Guatemala. It offers a wide range of services, including sending cards and packages both domestically as well as internationally. Most Guatemalan towns have a post office, although your best bet is to send mail from a large city. Service at El Correo is improving, thanks to consultation and assistance from Canada Post. Most post offices open from 8:30am to 5:30pm. Airmail letters to North America and Europe cost from Q6.50 and take a week or two to arrive. High-end hotels can usually send your mail for you, too. Expect packages you send through the Guatemalan mail system to take a very long time to arrive. They usually get there in the end, but it's worth paying extra for recorded delivery (correo registrado). Many stores can ship your purchases for you, for a cost. Valuable items are best sent with private express services. Couriers operating in Guatemala include DHL, UPS, and FedEx. Delivery within two to three business days for a 1-kg package starts at about Q500.

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This is version 23. Last edited at 8:02 on Jun 16, 14 by Utrecht. 1 article links to this page.

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