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Guadeloupe

Photo © Heart of Gold

Travel Guide Caribbean Guadeloupe

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Introduction

Guadeloupe's queen of the forest

Guadeloupe's queen of the forest

© All Rights Reserved cpcoelho

Named 'The Island of Beautiful Waters' by the Carib Indians who inhabited it at the time of its discovery, Guadeloupe's 'beautiful waters' are now the island's major attraction for overseas visitors. Whether you want to relax on the beach, enjoy a swim in the warm Caribbean, or test your surfing skills on one of the island's first-rate surfing spots, you should basically count on spending most of your time in, on, or next to the water. Of course, a hiking excursion to the summit of La Soufrière, Guadeloupe's active volcano, is a must. And Guadeloupe's interesting mix of cultures (the people are a hybrid of French, African and East Indian) makes for a varied and unique people group. But nothing beats the Caribbean attraction.

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Brief History

During his second trip to America, seeking fresh water in November 1493, Christopher Columbus became the first European to land on Guadeloupe. He called it Santa María de Guadalupe de Extremadura, after the image of the Virgin Mary venerated at the Spanish monastery of Villuercas, in Guadalupe, Extremadura. The expedition set ashore just south of Capesterre but did not leave any settlers ashore.

After successful settlement on the island of St Christophe (Saint Kitts), the French Company of the American Islands delegated Charles Lienard and Jean Duplessis, Lord of Ossonville to colonize one or any of the region’s islands, Guadeloupe, Martinique or Dominica. Due to Martinique’s inhospitable nature, the duo resolved to settle in Guadeloupe in 1635, took possession of the island and wiped out many of the Carib Amerindians. It was annexed to the kingdom of France in 1674. Over the next century, the island was seized several times by the British. The economy benefited from the hugely lucrative sugar trade introduced during the closing decades of the seventeenth century: one indication of Guadeloupe's prosperity at this time is that in the Treaty of Paris (1763), France, defeated in war, agreed to abandon its territorial claims in Canada in return for British return of Guadeloupe which was captured in 1759.
On 4 February 1810 the British once again seized the island and continued to occupy it until 1816. By the Anglo-Swedish alliance of 3 March 1813, it was ceded to Sweden for a brief period of 15 months. The British administration continued in place and British governors continued to govern the Island. By the Treaty of Paris of 1814 Sweden ceded Guadeloupe once more to France.

In 1946 the colony of Guadeloupe became an overseas department of France, and in 1974 it became an administrative center. Its deputies sit in the French National Assembly in Paris. On 15 July 2007 the island communes of Saint Martin and Saint Barthélemy were officially detached from Guadeloupe and became two separate French overseas collectivities with their own local administration, henceforth separated from Guadeloupe.

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Geography

Located as the southernmost of the Leeward Islands in the eastern Caribbean Sea, Guadeloupe comprises two main islands: Basse-Terre Island, Grande-Terre (separated from Basse-Terre by a narrow sea channel called Salt River) forming Guadeloupe proper. The adjacent French islands of La Désirade, Les Saintes and Marie-Galante come under jurisdiction of Guadeloupe.
Basse-Terre has a rough volcanic relief whilst Grande-Terre features rolling hills and flat plains. Guadeloupe was formed from multiple volcanoes, of which only Basse-Terre is not extinct.

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Regions/Arrondissements

Guadeloupe consists of 2 arondissements. It had a third one, the Arrondissement of Saint-Martin-Saint-Barthélemy, until they officially detached from Guadeloupe in February 2007.

  • Arrondissement of Basse-Terre
  • Arrondissement of Pointe-à-Pitre

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Cities/Towns

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Sights and Activities

Le Moule

Le Moule once was an early French capital of Guadeloupe. Besides that, it was an important Native American settlement before the colonial period. It is one of the most authentic provincial towns on Guadeloupe and has a bustling main street, fish market and a scenic harbor. There have been archaeological excavations in the region and Guadeloupe's archaeological museum, on the outskirts of town, is well worth a visit.

The town square has several historic buildings, including the town hall and a Neoclassical Catholic church. Along the river are some ruins from an old customs building and a fortress dating back to the French colonial times. Nearby is tranquil beach with reef-protected waters at L'Autre Bord, about one kilometer out of town. Baie du Moule, on the west side of town is equally popular, mainly with kayakers and surfers.

Reserve Cousteau

Jacques Cousteau made Pigeon Island world famous several decades ago by declaring it to be one of the world's top dive sites. The waters surrounding the island are now protected as the Reserve Cousteau. The place is an underwater paradise teeming with fish and coral reefs to explore. Naturally, snorkelling and diving are the main activities here but the island itself is just as nice to relax a bit and enjoy the sun.

Beaches

Guadeloupe has some fine beaches. Although some like St. Anne are very touristy and packed with people on most days, there are some more secluded areas the further you go from the main towns and tourist spots. Grande Anse is one of the most beautiful beaches of the island with white sands, palm trees and turquoise waters.

Waterfalls

Guadeloupe has some fine examples of refreshing waterfalls, which makes for a welcome relief after a bus ride or drive by car. Some of them are just near the road while others are set deep in the hilly jungle and require some more strenuous walking. Either way, having been to Guadeloupe without seeing any waterfall is a shame and almost impossible!

Other sights and activities

  • St François - for views to the islands west of the main island of Guadeloupe
  • Musée St-John Perse - Point-a-Pitre
  • Outer islands - reachable by ferry and some of them much quieter

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Weather

Guadeloupe has a hot and humid tropical climate with average daytime temperatures throughout the year of 30 °C and average nights around 23 °C. Most rain falls between June and October with a change of hurricanes from August onwards. Therefore, the drier (and slightly cooler) December to April period is the best time to visit weather wise. Unfortunately prices rise sharply during this period and the months of November and May still have good weather. So budget wise these latter months may be a good option as well.

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Getting There

By Plane

Air Caraibes is the major airline of the French Caribbean and Guadeloupe is its main base. Among the other French islands, it has direct flights to Cayenne in French Guiana and to Paris in France. Other destinations include Stockholm, Copenhagen, Havana and Panama City. Air Antilles serves Saint Lucia and several French islands.

By Boat

  • Guadeloupe - Dominica vv

L'Express des Iles operates almost daily services between the islands of Dominica and Guadeloupe. They leave Roseau, the capital of Dominica on Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 3:00pm (Saturday 1:00pm) and take about 2.5 hours. In the opposite direction, they leave Pointe-a-Pitre in Guadeloupe at Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays at 8:00am (Sundays 10:00am) and take under 2 hours.

  • Guadeloupe - Martinique vv

L'Express des Iles has regular services between Pointe-a-Pitre and Fort-de-France, the capital of Martinique. They leave almost daily around 8:00am and arrive around 11:45am. The ferries first go to Dominica, travelling onwards to Martinique.

  • Guadeloupe - Saint Lucia vv

L'Express des Iles has at least 3-4 weekly services to Castries. It's the same ferry which goes to Dominica and Martinique, thus leaving around 8:00am from Pointe-a-Pitre. It arrives in Castries around 3:00pm.

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Getting Around

By Plane

From Point-a-Pitre internatioanl airport there are domestic services to La Désirade, Terre-de-Haut and Marie-Galante with a number of airlines, including Air Caraibes and Air Guadeloupe.

By Car

Renting a car is very good way to cover both Basse Terre and Grande Terre and there are numerous agencies in the airport and the capital, both local as well as international. Prices are reasonable, especially if you are with 2 or more people sharing costs. Traffic drives on the right. and the roads in Guadeloupe are of good quality. A national driver's licence is enough.

By Bus

Guadeloupe has an efficient, reliable and cheap bus system with several lines running frequently all days, except Sundays. Most major towns and cities are connected by road from Point-a-Pitre and many other places on both Grande Terre as well as Basse Terre. There are also buses on Marie-Galante every day except Sunday. For an overview, check thebusschedule.com.
Taxis are available in and around Point-a-Pitre and the airport but are expensive.

By Boat

L'Express des Iles has daily services between the main island of Guadeloupe and several other islands. To the Iles des Saintes, there are daily connections leaving Pointe-a-Pitre (Grande-Terre) for Terre de Haut at 8:00am. In the opposite direction they leave Terre de Haut at 4:00pm.
There are two crossings daily (one in the morning and one in the late afternoon) as well between Terre de Haut and Trois Rivières (Basse-Terre) and between Terre de Bas and Trois Rivières.
From Terre de Haut you can take another local ferry to Terre de Bas as well.

Other connections include the ferry from Point-a-Pitre to Grand Bourg on the island of Marie Galante, which travels 3 times on weekdays, one of which is via Saint Louis. During weekends, especially on Sundays, there are less services.
Trois Rivières and Marie Galante are connected by ferries as well.

There are also daily regular ferries to Grande Anse on the island of La Desirade, east of Grande-Terre with Le Colibri. You can contact them at 357947 in Port de Peche. Iguana is another ferry operator between several islands, including connections between St Francois and Terre de Haut and Marie Galante and La Desirade and between St Anne and Terre de Haut and Marie Galante and La Desirade.

From Sainte Anne and/or Saint Louis in the west of Grande Terre you can take ferries to most of the above mentioned places, like La Desirade, Marie Galante and Iles del les Saintes. To add, there are also ferries to Petite Terre between Grand Terre and La Desirade, that make brief stops here.

CTM Deher has services between Basse Terre and Les Saintes several times daily.

You can find detailed maps, schedules, prices and information about companies at this website

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Red Tape

As part of France, entry requirements are roughly the same. Note that a Schengen Visa though is not valid.

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Money

See also Money Matters

As an Overseas Department of France, Guadeloupe has adopted the Euro (ISO code: EUR, symbol: ) as its official currency. One Euro is divided into 100 cents, which is sometimes referred to as eurocents, especially when distinguishing them with the US cents.

Euro banknotes come in denominations of €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200, €500. The highest three denominations are rarely used in everyday transactions. All Euro banknotes have a common design for each denomination on both sides throughout the Eurozone.

The Euro coins are 1 cent, 2 cents, 5 cents, 10 cents, 20 cents, 50 cents, €1 and €2. Some countries in the Eurozone have law which requires cash transactions to be rounded to the nearest 5 cents. All Euro coins have a common design on the denomination (value) side, while the opposite side may have a different image from one country to another. Although the image side may be different, all Euro coins remain legal tender throughout the Eurozone.

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Health

See also Travel Health

There are no vaccinations legally required to travel to Guadeloupe. There is one exception though. You need a yellow fever vaccination if you have travelled to a country (7 days or less before entering Guadeloupe) where that disease is widely prevalent.

It's a good thing to get your vaccinations in order before travelling to Guadeloupe. The general vaccination against Diphtheria, Tetanus and Polio (DTP) is recommended. Also a hepatitis A vaccination is recommended and vaccination against hepatitis B and typhoid are also sometimes recommended for stays longer than 3 months.

Dengue sometimes occurs as well. There is no vaccination, so buy mosquito repellent (preferably with 50% DEET), and sleep under a net. Also wear long sleeves if possible.

Finally, other possible health issues include diarrhea and other general travellers' diseases like motion sickness. Watch what you eat and drink and in case you get it, drink plenty of fluids (to prevent dehydration) and bring ORS.

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Safety

See also Travel Safety

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Keep Connected

Phone

See also International Telephone Calls

References

  1. 1 January 2006 estimate, http://www.insee.fr/fr/themes/tableau.asp?ref_id=poptc001®_id=26 (< ERROR: the link title is too long!)

Quick Facts

Guadeloupe flag

Map of Guadeloupe

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Capital
Basse-Terre
Government
Overseas Department of France
Nationality
Guadeloupean
Population
447 000 [1]
Languages
French, Creole patois
Religions
Christianity (Catholic), Hinduism and paganism
Currency
Euro (EUR) €
Calling Code
+590
Time Zone
UTC-4

Contributors

as well as Hien (2%), bentivogli (1%), dr.pepper (1%), travelnetwork (1%), KellieBarnes (1%)

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This is version 40. Last edited at 8:46 on Sep 3, 13 by KellieBarnes. 34 articles link to this page.

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