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Hong Kong

Photo © Utrecht

Travel Guide Asia China Hong Kong

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Introduction

Sight of Stanley

Sight of Stanley

© All Rights Reserved edhong

Handed back to the government of China by the British in 1997, Hong Kong's thriving capitalist market has in no way been slowed down by the influence of Communist rule. Skyscrapers are packed into a relatively small skyline on Hong Kong Island, as the fast-paced lives of business people tick away at ground level. Hong Kong retains its culture in rather remarkable fashion, with traditional street vendors occupying alleyways between said skyscrapers, floating restaurants operating in the harbor, or fishing families recalling Hong Kong's origins as a fishing village. These emblems of Chinese culture are all but invisible from the heights of Victoria Peak; but the breathtaking spectacle of Hong Kong's skyline, harbour and outer islands leaves no room for disappointment.

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Brief History

Human settlement in the area now known as Hong Kong dates back to the late Paleolithic and early Neolithic era. The area's earliest recorded European visitor was Jorge Álvares, a Portuguese explorer who arrived in 1513.
In 1839 the refusal by Qing Dynasty authorities to import opium resulted in the First Opium War between China and Great Britain. Hong Kong Island became occupied by British forces in 1841, and was formally ceded to Britain under the Treaty of Nanking at the end of the war. The British established a crown colony with the founding of Victoria City the following year. In 1860, after China's defeat in the Second Opium War, the Kowloon Peninsula and Stonecutter's Island were ceded to Britain under the Convention of Peking. In 1898, under the terms of the Convention for the Extension of Hong Kong Territory, Britain obtained a 99-year lease of Lantau Island and the adjacent northern lands, which became known as the New Territories. Hong Kong's territory has remained unchanged to the present. During the first half of the 20th century, Hong Kong was a free port of the British Empire.

Japan invaded Hong Kong on 8 December 1941 in the Second World War. The Battle of Hong Kong ended with British and Canadian defenders surrendering to Japan on 25 December. During the occupation, civilians suffered starvation, rationing, and hyper-inflation Hong Kong lost more than half of its population in the war. In 1945 Great Britain regained control of the colony. Hong Kong's population recovered quickly as a wave of migrants from China arrived for refuge from the ongoing Chinese Civil War. When the People's Republic of China was proclaimed in 1949, more migrants fled to Hong Kong in fear of persecution by the Communist Party. Besides the influx of immigrants there was also a flow of businesses mainly from Shanghai and Guangzhou that moved to Hong Kong.

Hong Kong rapidly industrialised, with its economy becoming driven by exports, and living standards rising steadily. The construction of Shek Kip Mei Estate in 1953 marked the beginning of the public housing estate programme, designed to cope with the huge influx of immigrants. Trade in Hong Kong accelerated even further when Shenzhen, immediately north of Hong Kong, became a special economic zone of China, and established Hong Kong as the main source of foreign investment to China. During the 1980’s China took over the role of Hong Kong as a heaven for lowcost labour, and Hong Kong’s economy became based on services.

In 1983, Hong Kong was reclassified from a British crown colony to a dependent territory. However with the lease of the New Territories due to expire within two decades, the governments of Britain and China were already discussing the issue of Hong Kong's sovereignty. In 1984 the two countries signed the Sino-British Joint Declaration, agreeing to transfer sovereignty to the People's Republic of China in 1997, and stipulating that Hong Kong would be governed as a special administrative region, retaining its laws and a high degree of autonomy for at least fifty years after the transfer. The Hong Kong Basic Law, which would serve as the constitutional document after the transfer, was ratified in 1990, and the transfer of sovereignty occurred at midnight on 1 July 1997.

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Geography

Hong Kong is located on China's south coast, 60 kilometres east of Macau on the opposite side of the Pearl River Delta. It is surrounded by the South China Sea on the east, south, and west, and borders the Guangdong city of Shenzhen to the north over the Shenzhen River. The territory's 1,104 km2 area consists of Hong Kong Island, the Kowloon Peninsula, the New Territories, and over 200 offshore islands, of which the largest is Lantau Island. Of the total area, 1,054 km2 is land and 50 km2 is inland water. Hong Kong claims territorial waters to a distance of 3 nautical miles. As much of Hong Kong's terrain is hilly to mountainous with steep slopes, less than 25% of the territory's landmass is developed, and about 40% of the remaining land area is reserved as country parks and nature reserves. Most of the territory's urban development exists on Kowloon peninsula, along the northern edge of Hong Kong Island, and in scattered settlements throughout the New Territories. The highest elevation in the territory is at Tai Mo Shan, 957 metres above sea level. Hong Kong's long and irregular coast provides it with many bays, rivers and beaches. Despite Hong Kong's reputation of being intensely urbanised, the territory has tried to promote a green environment, and recent growing public concern has prompted the severe restriction of further land reclamation from Victoria Harbour. Awareness of the environment is growing as Hong Kong suffers from increasing pollution compounded by its geography and tall buildings.

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Neighbourhoods

  • Hong Kong Island - the central southern part, home to its financial district;
  • Kowloon - one of the most densely populated areas in the world and busy day and night;
  • Lantau Island - in the east, home to the airport and a giant buddha!
  • New Territories - mostly everything else, including many islands and the border area with China.

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Sights and Activities

Outlying Islands

Although Hong Kong may be best known because of its busy city areas and skyline and markets, there are some great islands to explore, some of which are as quiet as rural China. Lantau is the biggest island which include the Ngong Ping Cable Car to the Ngong Ping village and a large Buddha statue. There are many fishing villages on Lantau Island as well and some great hikes. South of Hong Kong Island are even some more remote islands and on some of them there are no cars, which is a relief after walking in downtown Hong Kong or Kowloon. Many ferries leave from Hong Kong Island and it is easy to do some daytrips. Lamma Islands is one of the more popular ones.

Star Ferry

Since many years, the Star Ferry travels between Hong Kong Island and Kowloon across the Victoria Harbour and this is the best way to experience Hong Kong from the water. Check the Star Ferry website for more details and information about history and meaning of this important connections over the waters.

Shopping

Shopping in Hong Kong is guaranteed to be a great experience as this place is the third biggest diamond trading center in the entire world and also the main export place when it comes to finished jewelry. As a result, the benefits of buying nice jewelry here is substantial. The popularity of Hong Kong jewelry is based mostly on the high purity of the gold and silver but also on the good quality of the finished products. Nathan Road along the Tsim Sha Tui but also Hennessy Road are the places to go to find the finest jewelry.

Spa and Massage

As most of Hong Kong’s finest hotels as well as specialist clinics feature day spa facilities, you can put this experience on the "things to do in Hong Kong" list. You can unwind with a manicure, pedicure, relaxing massage or facial. Combining the Western luxury with the Eastern wisdom, the revitalization and satisfaction are a guarantee. A massage, healing reflexology, acupressure or maybe an aromatherapy bath are the recipe to leave you refreshed and ready to start new.

Symphony of lights

Symphony of lights

© All Rights Reserved Utrecht

Symphony of Lights

The Symphony of Lights is a daily light and laser show which is best viewed from Kowloon across the Victoria Harbour. Some buildings on Kowloon and many of the highrise buildings on Hong Kong Island join this spectacular activity and it starts at 8:00pm daily and lasts for about 10 minutes or so. The Avenue of the Stars in southern Kowloon is the best place to watch it. For more information check the Symphony of Lights website. The views across Victoria Harbour from Kowloon are beautiful anytime of day by the way.

Tian Tan Buddha

Big Buddha

Big Buddha

© All Rights Reserved sassy_girl

The Tian Tan Buddha is a huge bronze statue of a sitting Buddha, build on top of a hill, and near to the Po Lin monastary. The name Tian Tan Buddha cames from the base of the statue which is a model of the Altar of Heaven of Tian Tan, the Temple of Heaven found in Beijing. Under the Buddha are three floors containing the The Hall of Universe, The Hall of Benevolent Merit, and The Hall of Remembrance. It is claimed that some of the cremated remains of Buddha are located here. Surrounding the buddha are six statues of other gods, giving praise to Buddha. Visitors can climb the 268 steps that lead up to the statue, free of charge.

Travelling by helicopter

Traveling by helicopter offers a splendid panoramic view over the city and is one of the many things to do in Hong Kong. If this experience is not part of your daily routine, you can call the Hong Kong Helicopter Service Company or Helicopter Co., Ltd for more information. So, if you think it will work for you, then you might also give it a try.

Skyline from Victoria Peak

Skyline from Victoria Peak

© All Rights Reserved Utrecht

Victoria Peak

Victoria Peak is a 552-metre hill on Hong Kong Island and is mainly visited because it has some tremendous views from the top which can be reached by the Peak Tram. You can also walk up or first take the tram and walk down again which is probably the better option when the weather is hot. For more information about the Peak Tram and other sight in and around the Victoria Peak you can check The Peak website.

Other sights and activities

  • Shopping in the markets of Mong Kok.
  • Viewing ancient Chinese artefacts at the Hong Kong Museum of Art.
  • Try some Dim Sum in one of the many restaurants.
  • Hiking in the Sai Kung area, New Territories.
  • Hong Kong Disneyland - is located in Lantau Island. It has 7 themed areas. Visitors can take MTR to Disneyland Resort Station. There are 2 hotels in the Disneyland. However, it is the smallest Disneyland in the world, so spend 1 day in this theme park is already enough unless you are the super fans of Disneyland. Address: Penny's Bay, Lantau Island
    Man Mo Temple

    Man Mo Temple

    © All Rights Reserved Utrecht

  • Taking the tram and hitting the bars around Hong Kong Island at night.
  • Man Mo Temple.

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Events and Festivals

Cultural and Religious

  • Chinese New Year - No place on Earth celebrates Chinese New Year like Hong Kong! During the three weeks celebrated for New Years, streets are lined with flower markets, food stalls, and vibrant decorations. Visitors can expect to see extravagant parades, traditional Chinese music and dance, along with a first-class fireworks display (after all, China is where fireworks were invented!). Visitors can also tour religious sites and temples who are also celebrating the event. On the third day of the celebrations, Hong Kong hosts a very popular horse race, where participants hope to start the new year with a winning wager. Although dates for the new year vary every year, visitors can expect it to occur late January or early February.
  • Spring Lantern Festival - Trailing the heels of Chinese New Year, the Spring Lantern Festival occurs on day 15 of the first moon of the year (in 2013, this will be February 24th). Popularly referred to as the Chinese Valentines Day, this festival marks the completion of the New Years celebrations. Following old Chinese tradition, lanterns are lit in homes and public areas where singles gather to play matchmaking games.
  • Mid-Autumn Festival - This hugely popular event celebrates the annual harvest under the biggest and brightest moon of the year. During this festival, people eat "moon cakes", which are a small dessert cake filled with ground lotus, sesame seeds, and egg yolk. Along with the dessert, visitors will enjoy colorfully decorated streets and lanterns of many shapes and sizes. Dates of this festival vary every year with the moon, but it typically occurs in September.
  • Cheung Chau Bun - This important festival has deep historical roots in Chinese tradition as has been practiced for more than 100 years. When Cheung Chau was devastated by the plague, the Chinese prayed to their god, Pak Tai, to rid of evil spirits. When the plague was lifted, the Chinese continued with the tradition of giving offerings to Pak Tai each year during this festival. This festival is also a forum where locals can present their talents in the form of art, dance, and music. Elaborate parades with performers in traditional costumes can be seen in the streets during this celebration.
  • Chinese National Day - A national public holiday that marks the beginning of the two Golden Weeks in China. This holiday is celebrated all throughout mainland China, but Hong Kong is home to the biggest and most elaborate fireworks demonstration.
  • Birthday Celebration of Tin Hau - Tin Hau is a Chinese goddess believed to be able to forecast the weather and save sailors from shipwrecks. She is celebrated every year in this water festival that includes multiple parades (one on the land and the water), lion dances, and a Chinese opera performance. This festival occurs on the 23rd day of the 3rd lunar month.
  • Buddha's Birthday - This holiday is celebrated throughout Hong Kong with parties, food, and religious ritual. This Buddhist holiday commemorates Buddha's birth, enlightenment, and death. Some of the local rituals include: "bathing" a statue of Buddha as a symbol of purification, and eating bitter green cookie, with symbolize a sweeter future to come.

Other Festivals and Events

  • Hong Kong Art Fair (17 May 2013 - 20 May 2013) - Heldl at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre (HKCEC), this fair showcases the very best in contemporary art from hundreds of galleries across the globe. This event is internationally known as a great place to network with those in the art community.
  • The Hong Kong Dragon Boat Carnival (21 Jun 2013 - 23 Jun 2013) - This festival features some of Hong Kong's most celebrated traditional customs, features dynamic entertainment, and carnival games. But the main event is an exhilarating dragon boat competition, which takes place in Victoria Harbour off the Tsim Sha Tsui waterfront.
  • Lan Kwai Fong Beer and Music Fest - This outdoor summer beer and music festival is hosted annually by Lan Kwai Fong. Visitors can sample food and beer from all over the globe while listening to a variety of live musical acts. Over 70 local restaurants participate in this event, and there are more than 80 sessions of dance and music to choose from. This event is held every July.
  • Ani-Com and Games Hong Kong - A very popular event for the younger crowd. This event is Asia's answer to the US's infamous Comic-Con. Drawing thousands from all over the world each year, this festival features the latest and greatest in animation, comic-books, and video games.
  • Hong Kong's Wine and Dine Month - A spectacular event gathering the regions best food and wine producers and connoisseurs. An event that any foodie visiting the area should be sure not to miss! This event will feature food and wine pairings, tastings of signature dishes from the best in local cuisine, seafood festivals, street carnivals, and much more! This event occurs in October every year.
  • Hong Kong Winterfest - This Winter extravaganza was nominated by CNN as one of the top ten locations in the world to celebrate the Christmas holiday. During the holiday season, the whole city is illuminated in beautiful Christmas decorations and lights displays. Shopping centers are packed to the brim with shoppers trying to take advantage of the season's best deals. There is also a very popular New Years celebration, complete with a magnificent fireworks display.
  • Hong Kong Halloween Treats - Halloween is a highly celebrated holiday in Hong Kong. More than a month of celebrations include, costumes, haunted houses, scary events, special treats and eats, and tons of parties all take over downtown Hong Kong during this holiday event.

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Weather

Hong Kong generally has warm to hot weather with relatively high humidity. The worst months are from May/June to September when the temperatures are above 30 °C during the day and at night it doesn't get any cooler than 25 °C. On top of that, the humidity can be overwhelming and it is rainy season with serious downpours and occasional hurricanes (typhoons) which can strike Hong Kong. January and February are dry but cool with temperatures just under 20 °C on average and nights below 10 °C common. October to December is warmer and sunny and is the best time for a visit.

The Hong Kong Observatory provides comprehensive information about weather conditions.

JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec
Avg Max18.6 °C18.9 °C21.4 °C25 °C28.4 °C30.2 °C31.4 °C31.1 °C30.1 °C27.8 °C24.1 °C20.2 °C
Avg Min14.5 °C15 °C17.2 °C20.8 °C24.1 °C26.2 °C26.8 °C26.6 °C25.8 °C23.7 °C19.8 °C15.9 °C
Rainfall24.7 mm54.4 mm82.2 mm174.7 mm304.7 mm456.1 mm376.5 mm432.2 mm327.6 mm100.9 mm37.6 mm26.8 mm
Rain Days5.49.110.91214.719.117.616.914.77.45.54.5

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Getting There

By Plane

The Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) on the island of Chep Lap Kok serves all flights to and from Hong Kong, including the ones from mainland China. The national carrier is Cathay Pacific, considered one of the best airlines in the world. Cathay Pacific has flights to many destination throughout the world, including one of the longest direct flights: 16 hours to New York. It also has direct flights to other North American cities, like Los Angeles and Toronto. There are flights to most main airports in the Asian region, with connections to Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and India as well as flights to the Middle East. European destinations include Amsterdam, Paris and London. Several cities in Australia and Auckland in New Zealand have almost daily flights as well. Other airlines based in Hong Kong include Dragonair, Hong Kong Express Airways, Air Hong Kong, and Hong Kong Airlines. Literally dozens of other airlines fly to Hong Kong, including British Airways, Continental Airlines, KLM, Malaysia Airlines, Qantas, Singapore Airlines and Virgin Atlantic. Even a few budget airlines have flights to and from Hong Kong. Low-cost carrier AirAsia flies to Hong Kong from its hub in Kuala Lumpur.

The Airport Express is a dedicated train service between the airport and the city centre. These trains run every 12 minutes and the 36-kilometre distance to downtown Hong Kong is covered in just 24 minutes. The fare is around 100 Hong Kong dollars, which is expensive when compared to 30-40 dollars being charged by shuttle buses. Special passes are also available to tourists which include tickets of Airport Express plus 3 days of unlimited use of the metro system. There are several shuttle buses linking the airport with Kowloon, Hong Kong Island as well as the New Territories (e.g. Sha Tin). The major companies operating on this route are KMB and City Bus and the fare from airport to city centre ranges between 30-40 HKD. Terminal-to-terminal travel is also quick and simple. Operated by the Airport Authority and maintained by MTR Corporation, there is an automated people mover connecting the East Hall to the West Hall and Terminal 2. Extension to SkyPier was also completed and opened to public in late 2009.

If you are coming from mainland China, it is cheaper to take a plane to Shenzhen than to fly directly to Hong Kong. From Shenzhen Airport, there is a ferry service to Kowloon (about HK$160). A much cheaper alternative is to take the shuttle-bus to the Shenzhen Central Bus Station (about 40 minutes, 20 RMB), then cross the border by foot and get on the MTR East Rail Line (Lo Wu Station).

By Train

MTR operates intercities across the border to Shenzhen and Guangzhou, but also places further afield like Beijing and Shanghai. Most trains to Hong Kong terminate at the Hung Hom station in the east of Kowloon.

By Car

There are six overland border crossings between Hong Kong and China. These are Lo Wu, Lok Ma Chau Spur Line, Lok Ma Chau, Man Kam To, Sha Tau Ko and Shenzhen Bay. Lo Wu is a train and pedestrian crossing; Lok Ma Chau is a pedestrian crossing; Lok Ma Chau and Sha Tau Kok are road, bus and pedestrian crossings, Man Kam To and Shenzhen Bay bridge are road and bus crossings.

Few travellers get here with their own or rental car, as driving to/from China usually means a lot of hassle as you need a special Chinese driver's licence.

By Bus

There are various Cross Boundary Coach operators going to several destinations in China, including Shenzhen and Guangzhou and its airports.

By Boat

There are several companies operating ferry services between Hong Kong, Macau, and neighbouring cities in Guangdong at different terminals. China Ferry Terminal in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong - Macau Ferry Terminal in Sheung Wan .

Turbojet

  • Hong Kong - Macau
  • Hong Kong International Airport - Macau
  • Hong Kong International Airport – Nansha, Guangzhou

New World First Ferry

  • Hong Kong (Tsim Sha Tsui) - Macau

Chu Kong Passenger Transport Co

  • Hong Kong (Tsim Sha Tsui) - several Guangzhou cities and towns
  • Hong Kong International Airport - several Guangzhou cities and towns

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Getting Around

Public Transport
There are numerous ways of getting around by public transport. If you spend some time in Hong Kong and decide to use the public transport often, be sure to get a Octopus Card, which generally is more convenient and gives you unlimited access to almost all of the buses, ferries, trams and the underground system. You just have to make sure you have money on the card at all times, which can be automatically deducted from your card. There are also Airport Express Octopus cards and 3-day Octopus cards, usually only valid on MTR lines (see below).

By Bus

Public double-decker buses ply all the main routes. Companies include Kowloon Motor Bus, Citybus, New World First Bus and New Lantao Bus.
There are also smaller minibus vans, the red minibuses and green minibuses. Using these buses can be confusing, as some might accept the Octopus card, while others don't. Also, some give change, other won't.
Kowloon Canton Railway has some feeder buses as well.

By Boat

The Star Ferry probably is a landmark of its own in Hong Kong. It's very cheap and a great way to view both Hong Kong Island as well as Kowloon from the water of the Hong Kong Harbor. But there are numerous other ferries travelling between almost all islands, closeby and further away. Ferries to Lamma and Lantau are the most popular and convenient.

Other public transport

MTR
The Hong Kong Mass Transit Railway (MTR) is a very fast, comfortable and convenient way of getting around most of the area. Lines include the Tung Chung Line to the Lantau Island, the Tsuen Wan Line between Central, Tsim Sha Tsui and Mongkok and the Island Line which runs along the north of Hong Kong Island. The Airport Express is not a MTR line but stops at several of the stations along the Tung Chung Line as well, making it possible to switch between them.

Tram
Hong Kong Tramways offers a great way of getting around cheaply, albeit slowly as well. These city trams run along the north of Hong Kong Island. And of course there is the Victoria Peak Tram which probably is one of the highlights of Hong Kong in itself. Take MTR to Tung Chung MTR station and take Ngong Ping Cable Car to Po Lin Monastery, Ngong Ping, where the Tian Tan Big Buddha Statue located.

By Car

Roads in Hong Kong are in a good condition and so are road signs and even the driving skills of the locals. Still, it is not recommended to rent a car, basically because it is just not necessary. It will cost at least US$50-60 for the smallest car and with public transport so extensive around all of Hong Kong, you would be fooling yourself. If you insist, most international companies offer cars at the international airport and several places downtown. Traffic drives on the left and a national or international driving permit is required.
However, if you plan to visit the New Territories (for example to try one of the fantastic sea food restaurants) you might need a car. There are some bus lines, but they are not very frequent.

By Foot

Of course, walking around Hong Kong is still one of the best ways to experience the hustle and bustle of this city balancing on modernity and eastern values. Still, it is best combined with the occasional trip by tram, metro, bus or ferry. Taking the peaktram and walking back down to Central is great (and better than walking uphill in the humid heat), but other walks worth the effort include a combined walk and elevator route taking the longest elevator in the world, going up and down the steep hills of Central Hong Kong Island.
If you are more into hiking, there are great walks in the mountains of Lantau and further afield there are fantastic coastal walks on one of the many almost inhabited islands.

By Bike

Biking is less popular than walking and best done in the New Territories or on one of the flatter islands or islands where traffic (read cars) is less crowded and thus safer and more enjoyable. There are many places to rent bikes, including major transport hubs, but also at some hotels and downtown places. Biking in the city itself is best avoided and not that enjoyable.

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Red Tape

Citizens of the following countries are allowed to enter Hong Kong without a visa for a limited period of time.

  • 180 days - United Kingdom
  • 90 days - Andorra, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bermuda, Botswana, Brazil, British Overseas Territories citizens, British Overseas citizens, British Antartic Territory, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Bulgaria, Canada, Cayman Islands, Chile, Colombia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, Ecuador, Egypt, Estonia, Falkland Islands, Faroe Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, Gambia, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Guyana, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Kenya, Kiribati, Korea (South), Latvia, Leichtenstein, Lithuana, Luxembourg, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Montserrat, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Papua New Guinea, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovak, Slovenia, Spain, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts-Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tanzania, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Tuvalu, Uruguay, USA, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Zambia, Zimbabwe.
  • 30 days - Bahrain, Bolivia, Cape Verde, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Indonesia, Jordan, Kuwait, Morocco, Oman, Paraguay, Peru, Qatar, Samoa, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Thailand, Tunisia, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, Yemen.
  • 14 days - Algeria, Benin, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Croatia, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Lesotho, Macedonia, Madagascar, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Micronesia, Mongolia, Mozambique, Niger, Palau, Philippines, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Suriname, Vatican City.

For the latest update, refer to the Hong Kong Immigration Department -Visa/Entry Permit Requirements.

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Money

See also: Money Matters

Currency: Hong Kong Dollar. There are 100 cents to the dollar.
Symbol: HK$, HKD
Notes: HK$1,000, 500, 100, 50, 20 and 10 dollars
Coins: HK$10, 5, 2 and 1, and 50, 20 and 10 cents

Banks
There are numerous banks and ATM machines are plentyful. Banking hours are Monday to Friday 09:00am-5:30pm; Saturday 09:00am to noon; Sunday closed. Some branches have longer hours.

Credit Cards
All major cards including American Express, Visa and Diners Club are widely accepted.

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Work

Working Holiday Scheme

The Hong Kong Government organises a Working Holiday Scheme to facilitate cultural and educational exchange between Hong Kong and the participating country. This scheme is open to citizens of Australia, Ireland and New Zealand, aged between 18 and 30 years. Successful applicants will be issued a 12-month visa and are allowed to engage in employment, but not exceeding three months with the same employer. Participants from Australia and New Zealand are also allowed to enrol in study or training courses of not more than three months, during their stay.

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Study

There are seven public universities (government-funded) in Honk Kong:

and one self-financing university:

Most lectures are hold in English.

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Language

Chinese and English are the two official languages, with Cantonese being the most widely spoken. English is spoken by a good proportion of the popluation. Street names are generally in both English and Chinese, but many shops and businesses have only Chinese signs.

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Eat

Eating in Hong Kong is both a pleasant and adventurous experience if you know where to go. There are many small restaurants for example in Kowloon that serve Chinese dishes at reasonably cheap prices, but the quality is often not very good. The best thing to do in Hong Kong is to eat in a sea food restaurant somewhere at the coast (for example in the New Terrotorries, on Hong Kong Island or one of the other Islands). The marine animals should still be alive when you choose them. They will then be freshly prepared and you pay them by their weight. The rice often comes at the end, so if you want it together with the sea food you have to say so.

Hong Kong is home to the world's cheapest Michelin star-rated restaurant, Tim Ho Wan. If dumplings are your thing, this is the ultimate. Although the prices are low, the queues to get in are long - don't be surprised if you have to wait for 2 hours! Open daily from 10:00am-10:00pm, Shop 8, 2-20 Kwong Wa Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon. Phone: +852 2332 2896.

  • elite&i=440 - Nanhai No. 1 is an upscale Chinese fine dining and drinking destination in Tsim Sha Tsui. Located on the 30 Floor in iSQUARE with an outdoor alfresco deck in their Eyebar, the restaurant has an panoramic view of the city’s Victoria Harbour. Opened by Elite Concepts, Nanhai No. 1 combines contemporary Chinese cuisine focusing on the treasures of the South China Sea region. Its daily fresh catch from local waters is one of the attractions of the diverse menu. Nanhai No. 1’s sleek interior design and historical maritime artifacts make it one of the most stylish alfresco restaurant in Hong Kong. The aqua themed Eyebar runs the entire length of the restaurant, its amazing seaviews are breath taking. The bar offers a wide range of exotic cocktails, wines and spirits. Address: 30/F, iSQUARE, 63 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong., Phone: (852) 2487 3988, Hours: 11:30am – Late

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Sleep

Rents in Hong Kong are very high due to the restricted living space. Therefore, rooms are either very expensive or just expensive but very small.

Budget

There are a lot of hostels in Hong Kong. Most of them are no more than some joining appartments, each divided in several rooms. So if you are on a low budget, prepare yourself to spend most of your time outside of your hostel.

PropertyAddressTypePopularity
A-InnRoom 809 & 1304 , 8/F, Sincere House 83 Argyle St. Mong KokHostel74
Ah Shan Hostel Hong KongRoom 1406, 14th floor, Sincere house, 83 Argyle St Hong KongHostel77
Apple HostelB3, 10/fl., Block B, Chungking Mansions Tsim Sha Tsui, 36-44 Nathan Road, KowloonHostel80
Ashoka HostelA Blk. Flr. 13, A4 Chung King Mansion 36 - 44 Nat,TsimshatsuiHostel69
Bishop Lei International House4 Robinson Road, Mid-Levels Central & Western DistrictHotel79
Chung Kiu InnFlat P, 15/F, Hong Kong Mansion, 1 Yee Wo St. Causeway BayGuesthouse75
City Plus HostelFlat 902, 9th Floor, Sincere House No. 83 Argyle Street, Mong Kok, KowloonHostel74
Comfort Hostel HKA1, 9/F, 47 Paterson Street Causeway BayHostel79
Comfort Lodge7-8 Tak Hing Street Knight Garden Block C 6th Floor, TsimshatsuiHotel-
Cosmic Guest House12/F Block A1, A2, F1,F4 Mirador Mansion 54-64 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha TsuiHostel-
Dragon Hostel Hong KongRm 707, Sincere House. 83 Argyle Street. Mong KokHostel75
Dragon InnFlat B1-B5, 3/F, Block B, Chung King Mansion, Tsui Sha TsimHostel75
Evergreen Hotel Kowloon48, Woo Sung Street Jordan, KowloonHotel-
Four Seasons HostelA2, 14/F, Block A, Chung King Mansion 33-44 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, KowloonHostel70
Geo-Home Holiday HostelFlat C& D, 9/F., Kingland Apartment 737 Nathan Road, KowloonHostel77
Germany HostelBlock -D-6F/D2,Chung King Mansion 36-44 Nathan Road, KowloonGuesthouse74
Go Inn Hong KongFlat C, 16/F, Continetal Mansion, 294 King's Rd. Fortress HillGuesthouse72
Golden Island GuesthouseFLAT 1, 7/F ALHAMBRA BUILDING, 383-385 NATHAN ROAD, YAUMATEI, KOWLOONHostel73
Golden Ocean HotelC6 8/F Block C Chung King Mansion Yau Tsim Mong District (Tsim Sha Tsui)Hostel75
Guangdong Guest HouseB2, 5/F Block B, Chungking Mansion, 36-44 Nathan RHostel84
Hakkas GuesthouseFlat L 3/F., New Lucky House, 300 Nathan Rd. KowloonHostel74
Harbour Guest HouseB8, 4/F, Block B, Chung King Mansion, 36-44 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha ShuiHostel71
HK Star World Guest HouseUnit J, 9/F, Wing Lee Building, 27-33 Kimberley RoadHostel77
Hong Kong Budget HostelRoom 703, Sincere House, 83 Argyle Street,Hostel66
Hong Kong Hostel3/F, Block A, 47 Paterson Street Causeway BayHostel81
Hong Kong InnA1, 10/F, 47 Paterson Street Causeway BayHostel75
Hong Kong Star Hostel11/F, Block E, Chung King Mansion, 36-44 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha TsuiHostel62
HongKong City Guesthouse7/F, D3 Chungking Mansions Tsim Sha Tsui, KowloonGuesthouse73
Hop Inn2A Hanyee building, 19-21 Hankow Road, Tsim Sha TsHostel76
Ibis North Point138 Java Road North PointHotel-
International Inn11/FLOOR A9, Block A Chung King Mansion 36-44 Nathan Rd.,KowloonHostel74
Ka Wut VillaFlat/Rm 163, 1/F, Front Block, Hung Tak Bldg Mong KonHostel70
Kowloon Budget Hostel36-44 Nathan RoadHostel66
Las Vegas GuesthouseFlat C4, Floor 15,Block C, Chung King Mansion, 36- Tsim Sha TsumHostel-
Lee Garden Guest HouseBlock A, 8/F, 34-36 Cameron Road, Tsimshatsui, KowloonHostel75
Man Hing Lung HotelFlat F2 14/F, Mirador Mansion 58 Nathan Rd., Tsim Sha TsuiHotel-
Maple Leaf GuesthouseE4, Block E, 12nd Floor, Chung King MansionsHostel82
Marlboro HostelFlat/RM C2 2/F, Paterson Building, 37 Paterson St. Causeway BayHostel-
New International Guest HouseA7 11/FL 36-44 NATHAN RD. CHUNG KING MANSION TST KHostel74
New Peking Guest HouseA1 12/F Block A Chung King Mansion Yau Tsim Mong District (Tsim Sha Tsui)Hostel78
Ocean Guest HouseA4 15/F Block A Chung King Mansion Yau Tsim Mong District (Tsim Sha Tsui)Hostel76
Oi Suen GuesthouseRoom 811-812, 8/F, Sincere House, 83 Argyle StreetGuesthouse74
Osaka Guest HouseFlat C3, Block C,13/F, Chungking Mansions 36-44 Nathan Road, Tsimshatsui, KowloonHostel-
Panda Hotel3 Tsuen Wah Street Tsuen Wan, KowloonHotel76
Paris Guesthouse7-F D8 Chungking Mansions 33-44 Nathan Rd. Tsim Sha TsuHostel-
Park Guest HouseA1 15/Floor A Block Chung King Mansion 36-44 NATHAN RoadHostel85
Rent-A-Room Hong Kong7-8 Tak Hing Street, Knight Garden Flat A 2nd FloorHostel78
Sun Kong HostelFlat D2, 5th Floor,Block D, Paterson Building,9 Gr Causeway BayHostel-
Super 7 HostelB7, 5/F Block B Chungking Mansion, Tsimshatsui, KoHostel78
Toms Guest HouseC1, 16/F Block C Chung King Mansion Yau Tsim Mong District (Tsim Sha Tsui)Hostel73
TWH-Tai Wan Hotel Hong KongFlat A5, 3 Floor, Block A, Chung King Mansions, No Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong KongHostel66
USA HostelC4,13F Mirador Mansion 58 Nathan Road Tsim Sha TsuHostel-
Vincent Guest House58 Nathan Road, Mirador Mansion Flat B3, 16 Floor, Tsim Sha TsuiHostel72
Y-LoftYouth Square 238 Chai Wan Road, Chai WanHostel79
YesinnFlat B, 5/F, Front Block, 294 King's Road Fortress HillHostel78
Yesinspace4/F, Yesinn House, 10 Anchor Street TaiKokTsui, KowloonHostel64
Yiu Fai Guest HouseFlat E, 6th/F. 66-70 Nathan RoadHostel80
Kyoto Guest HouseBlock A, 15th Floor, A3 & A8, Chung King Mansion 36 - 44 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, KowloonHOSTEL79
Hollywood GuesthouseFlat/RM A1, Blc A, 14 Floor,Chongking Mansion 36-44 Nathan Rd.,KowloonGuesthouse70
England Premier Backpackers Inn (Hong Kong)Flat C,Floor 15,Block C, Chung King Mansion, Nathan Road 36-44,Hostel-
UK Deluxe HostelBlock A - 3rd Floor ChungKing Mansion 36-44 Nathan RoadHostel-
Kowloon Big InnFlat F1, Floor 13 Mirador Mansion, 62 Nathan Road, TSTHostel-
Canadian Hostel Hong KongBlock E, Flat E/6, 7th Floor, Chung King Mansions, Tsim Tsa Tsui, Hong KongHostel76
Wang Fat HostelNo A2, 3/F, Paterson Bldg., 47 Paterson St. Causeway BayHostel79
New Hong Kong HostelFlat C1,Floor 6,Block C,Chung King Mansion,Nathan KowloonHostel68
Alisan Guest House23 Cannon Street 5/F unit A Causeway BayGuesthouse76
MK Business HotelFlat 901, 9/F, Sincere House 83 Argyle St, Mongkok, Kln, H.K.Hotel-
Embassy Hotel (Service Apartment)Unit A, 3/F, National Court 240-252 Nathan Road, KowloonHostel-
Venetian HostelFlat F1, 13/F Mirador Mansion, Tsim Sha Tsu 58 Nathan RoadHostel-
Luxury European HostelFlat C5,Floor 15,Block C, Nathan Rd. 36-44, Chung King MansionHostel-
Marco Polo Hostel HKFlat C6,Floor 15,Block C, Chung King Mansion, Nathan Rd.36-44,Tsim Sha Tsui,Hostel-
Kowloon New HostelF1, 13/F, Mirador Mansion 58 Nathan RdHostel-
New Asia Guesthouse8th Floor A Block Chung King Mansion 36-44 Nathan RoadHostel-
Hollywood Guest HouseA1, 14/F Block A Chung King Mansion 36-44 Nathan RoadHostel-
The Anne Black - YWCA5 Man Fuk Road,Hostel-
Ashoka Guest HouseA Blk. Flr. 13 A4 Chung King Mansion 36 - 44 Nathan Road (T.S.T.)Guesthouse-
Garden Hostelblk C 16/floor C5 Chung king mansion Tsim Sha TsumHostel-
Yan Yan Guest HouseE1 8/F Block E, Chung King Mansion, Tsim Sha TsuiGuesthouse-
King Wah HostelFlat 1003, 10 Floor, Sincere House, 83 Argyle Street Mong KokHostel-
Hong Kong Downtown BackpackersFlat A1 - Block A - 3rd Floor ChungKing Mansion 36-44 Nathan RoadHostel-
New Garden HostelFlat D1, 13/F, Mirador Mansion 58-62 Ntahan Road, Hong KongHostel-
Travelers Friendship HostelE1, 13/F, Mirador Mansion 58-62 Nathan Rd Tsim Sha TsuiHostel-
Ho King Hostel1517, Sun Hing Building 607 Nathan RoadHostel-
GuangZhou Guest houseFlat B1,10F Mirador Mansion 54-64 Nathan RoadGuesthouse-
DoubleSeven GuesthouseA Block, 7th Floor 36-44Nathan Road Chung King MansionGuesthouse-
Golden Maple Leaf HostelE Block 12/FLOOR E1 Flat Chung King Mansion 36-44 Nathan Road. TsimShaTsuiHostel-
Tokyo HostelBlock D, Flat D1, 8th Floor, Chung King Mansion 40 Nathan Road. Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong KongHostel77
Ashoka HotelA Blk. Flr. 13, A3 Chung King 36 - 44 Nathan Road (T.S.T.),Hostel-
Delta Hotel Hong KongFlat A5, 16th Floor, Block A, chung king mansion 36-44 Nathan Road,Tsim Sha Shui,KawloonHOSTEL73
Australian Guest houseBlock D, 16/F, Flat D7, Chungking Mansion 36-44 Nathan Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, KowloonHOSTEL75
Tin Tong Backpacker9th Floor, 245 Apliu Street, Sham Shui Po,Hostel-
Merryland Guest House13/F, D2, Nathan Rd Mirador Mansion KowloonGuesthouse-
Day and Night HostelFlat D8 & E2, Block D & E, 10/F Chungking Mansions,40 Nathan Road,KowloonHOSTEL75
New London HostelFlat A9, Block A, 17/F, Chungking Mansions, 40 NatGUESTHOUSE73
Pandas Hostel - CozyFlat C, 11/Floor, 88 Nathan Road Comfort Building, Tsim Sha TsuiHOSTEL-
Lucky HotelFlat C5, Floor 12, Block C, ChungKing Mansion Nathan Road 36-44Hostel-
Forever Love HostelBlock C Floor 15 Flat C Chung King Mansion Nathan Road 36-44,Hostel-
Tai Wan Deluxe HotelFlat A8 - Block A - 3rd Floor Chungking Mansion 36-44 Nathan RoadHotel-
Golden Crown Guesthouse13/F,5/F Golden Crown Court, 66-70 Nathan Road TsamShaTsuiGUESTHOUSE-
Pandora after 80sFlat F, 11/F, No.275 Gloucester Road Entrance on Cannon Street, Causeway Bay D1 exitHOSTEL80
Canada HotelFlat A6, Block A, 15/F Chung King Mansion 36-44 Nathan RoadHotel-
Day HostelFlat D6, Block D, 10 Floor, Chungking Mansion 36-44 Nathan Road, TST, KowloonHOSTEL73
New Chung King Mansion HotelFlat C5 , Floor 7, Block C, ChungKing Mansion, Nathan Road 36-44Hostel-
Check Inn HK3/F, Kwong Wah Mansion 269-273 Hennessy Road,Wan ChaiHOSTEL86
Backpackers Hostel HKA3, 10/F, 47 Paterson Street Causeway BayHOSTEL75
Bridal Tea House Hotel - Yau Ma TeiNo. 6 Arthur Street Yau Ma TeiHOTEL69
Budget HostelB5, 2/F, Block B, 2-4 Kingston Street Causeway BayHOSTEL76
Calton HostelFlat C1, Floor 15, Block C, Chung King Mansion,36-HOSTEL72
New China Guest HouseD7 D2 9/F Block D, Chung King Mansion Tsim Sha Tsui KowloonGUESTHOUSE73
Studios HK47 paterson street, block A, 3rd floor, unit A5 Causeway BayHOSTEL74
Bradbury Jockey Club Youth Hostel66, Tai Mei Tuk Road Tai PoHOSTEL-
Bridal Tea House Hotel - To Kwa WanNo. 14-18 Sung Wong Toi Road To Kwa WanHOTEL-
Bridal Tea House - Tai Kok Tsui Li Tak StreetNo. 36-38 Li Tak Street Tai Kok Tsui, KowloonHOTEL75
Bridal Tea House Hotel - Hung Hom Winslow St.No.57-61 Winslow Street Hung Hom, KowloonHOTEL-
Bridal Tea House Hotel - Hung Hom Wuhu StreetNo. 84-86 Wuhu Street Hung HomHOTEL-
Bridal Tea House Hotel - Tai Kok Tsui Anchor St.No.8 Anchor Street KowloonHOTEL-
Bridal Tea House Hotel - Western DistrictNo. 385-387, Queen's Road West Sai Ying PunHOTEL-
Golden PalaceRm 695, 5/F, WinnerMansion , 695-697 Nathan Rd, Mong Kok, Kln., HKHOSTEL-
Las Vegas GuesthouseFlat C4, Floor 15,Block C, Chung King Mansion, 36- Tsim Sha TsumGUESTHOUSE68
Hong Kong GuestFL/10-B4, TsimShaTsui Mansion No. 83-97 Nathan Road TsimShaTsuiGuesthouse-
Homy InnFlat F, 6th Floor&Flat B, 7th Floor, Union Mansion 33-35 Chatham Road South, Tsim Sha Tsui, KowloonHOSTEL83
Yesinn @CAUSEWAY BAY2/F, Nan Yip Building, 472, Hennessy Road Causeway BayHOSTEL84
Nagaland Guest HouseBlock d ,Floor 17,Flat D4 Chung King Masion 36-44 Nathan Road Tsim Sha Tsui,GUESTHOUSE73
InnSight3/F, 9 Lock Road Tsim Sha Tsui, KowloonHOSTEL-
Kingston InnUnit 3 & 4, 4A Kingston Bld. 2-4 Kingson St., Causeway bayHOSTEL75
Safari Guest HouseFlat6,7fl,Blk C, Chunking mansions,36-44 Nathan RoGUESTHOUSE75
Galaxy WiFi Hotel1/F 33-39 Pitt Street Yau Ma Tei,KowloonGUESTHOUSE-
New Tokyo HostelBlock D,D8 16/floor ChungKing Mansion 34-44 Nathan Road TST KowloonHostel-
Hop Inn on Carnarvon9/F James S. Lee Mansion, 33 - 35 Carnarvon Road (entrance on Prat Ave.), Tsim Sha Tsui, KowloonHOSTEL76
Micro HotelRoom 9, 5/F, Alhambra Building 385 Nathan Road,Yau Ma TeiGUESTHOUSE75
Lucky Hostel13F, Chun Yee Building 731-733 Nathan RdHOSTEL-
Jockey Club Mt. Davis Youth Hostel123 Mount Davis Path PokfulamHOSTEL-
YHA Ngong Ping SG Davis Youth HostelNgong Ping Lantau IslandHOSTEL-
Korean Hostel HKFlat E4, Block E,11/F Chung King Mansions, 36-44 NathaHOSTEL-
Pandas Hostel - StylishFlat A, 11 Floor, 88 Nathan Road, Comfort BuildingHOSTEL-
Tohou HotelFalt G, 4/F, 300-306 Nathtan Road, Jordan KowloonHOTEL-
Parkview HostelFlat14A, 14th floor,Chesterfield Mansion 11 Kingston Street, Causeway BayHOSTEL-
Perch Studio3/F, 531 Lockhart Road Causeway bayAPARTMENT-
iGuest HostelFlat 4D, 4/F, Mirador Mansion 58-68 Nathan RoadHOSTEL-
Simply HostelFlat H, 11/F, New Lucky House 300 Nathan RoadHostel-
Kamal DeluxeB8, 5/floor, Block B, Chung King Mansions 36-44 Nathan Rd, Tsim Sha Tsui, KowloonGUESTHOUSE-
Happy Yeung GuesthouseFlat B7,Block B, 17/F,Chungking Mansions,36-44 Nat Tsim Sha Tsui,Kowloon,Hong KongGUESTHOUSE-
Leisure HostelFlat 2, 7/F, Block B ChungKing Mansions, No.36-44HOSTEL-
Urban PackUnit 1410, 14/F, HaiPhong Mansion, 99-101 Nathan Road Tsim Sha Tsui, KowloonHostel-

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Drink

Much of Hong Kong's nightlife revolves around Lan Kwai Fong, a pedestrian area in Central, popular with the expat community and young partying Hong Kongers. Here you will find every type of bar you could want for a night out - pubs, dance clubs, shooter bars, and live music venues. Much of the action spills unto the street where you can dance and party with the crowds drinking at the 711.

For live music and a drinking scene slightly removed from the debauchery of Lan Kwai Fong, head to Wan Chai, where you will find a selection of live music bars, restaurants, alongside some of Hong Kong's seedier offerings.

For a more relaxed scene popular with the expat business community, the streets around the mid-level escalators (Elgin and Stauton) have countless finer bars and restaurants, as well as some pubs and casual drinking holes.

Drinks in Hong Kong can be expensive, so take advantage of the excellent happy hours (usually 1/2 price) offered by most bars in the city before 8:00 or 9:00pm.

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Health

See also: Travel Health

There are no vaccinations legally required to travel to Hong Kong. There is one exception though. You need a yellow fever vaccination if you have travelled to a country (7 days or less before entering Hong Kong) where that disease is widely prevalent.

It's a good thing to get your vaccinations in order before travelling to Hong Kong. The general vaccination against Diphtheria, Tetanus and Polio (DTP) is recommended. Also a hepatitis A vaccination is recommended and when travelling longer than 2 weeks also typhoid. Vaccination against Tuberculosis as well as hepatitis B are sometimes recommended for stays longer than 3 months.

Only in rare cases is vaccination against Japanese Encephalitis recommended. Malaria does not occurs in Hong Kong, but dengue sometimes does. Just use mosquito repellant and wear long sleeves if you can when it is dark.

Finally, other possible health issues include diarrhea and other general travellers' diseases like motion sickness. Watch what you eat and drink and in case you get it, drink plenty of fluids (to prevent dehydration) and bring ORS.

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Safety

See also: Travel Safety

Hong Kong is a very safe place to visit and like most cities the usual precautions apply, like keeping your valuables either invisible to others when you are outside or keep it in a hotel lock if it's possible.
Maybe one of the main safety concerns is traffic. Although there are good public transportation options, cars are everywhere and especially Kowloon and parts of Hong Kong Island are very crowded. Just watch out and keep to the main pedestian crossings.

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Keep Connected

Internet

Tip for free internet access: coffee shops. Most coffee shops have free internet access, wireless or on the present machines.

Internet cafes used to charge from $20-30 per hour but most of those Internet cafes have been terminated since and when almost everyone started to connect to internet at home, work and on their mobile phones as the Internet has become widely available.

3G-enabled phone users can also go for a temporary 3G plan from the different operators. Some of the operators, such as One2Free, usually offer an unlimited 3G access for week for $78. Getting a sim card is straightforward and hassle free and everything you need to do is go to a mobile phone shop, pay your money and get a card. As a result, no registration is needed.

To get access to commercial WIFI hotspots, mainly provided by PCCW' and Y5ZONE, for $70 you will get one week of unlimited usage (Nov 2011). Those companies also have daily, weekly and monthly plan ($158 and $98 per month for PCCW and Y5ZONE, respectively). In some restaurants such as McDonald's, you also usually have 20 minutes of free WIFI access provided by Y5ZONE.

Most of the hotels, even down market ones, provide Wi-Fi access to their guests.

Free internet terminals are usually widely available in some Starbucks, Pacific Coffee Company and some of the shopping malls, but also the airport or the MTR (for example Wan Chai station, Central Station, Tsim Sha Shui Station). Furthermore, the government offers a big network of free WIFI hot spots in most government premises and also in the public libraries.

Phone

See also: International Telephone Calls

Post

http://www.hongkongpost.com/eng/index.htm|Hong Kong Post]] offers fast and reliable services. International postal rates for airmail start at around 2.5 HKD. For parcels, they are good as well, or you can use international courier services like DHL or UPS.

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References

  1. 1 Census and Statistics Department (End-2007 est.)

Quick Facts

Hong Kong flag

Map of Hong Kong

[edit]

Local name
Xianggang
Capital
None
Government
Limited Democracy - Special Administrative Region of China
Nationality
noun: Chinese/Hong Konger, adjective: Chinese/Hong Kong
Population
6,963,100[1]
Languages
Chinese (Cantonese, Mandarin), English
Religions
Mixture of local religions, Christianity
Currency
Hong Kong Dollar (HKD)
Calling Code
+852
Time Zone
UTC+8
Coordinates
  • Latitude: 22.281873
  • Longitude: 114.161346

Contributors

as well as chandie702 (10%), Hien (9%), Herr Bert (6%), simony (6%), hotelscheap (5%), Peter (5%), MlleKosuch (5%), Hongkong1 (3%), nigelpeaco (3%), Degolasse (1%), magykal1 (1%), dr.pepper (1%), arif_kool (1%), Joekswu (<1%), mojorob (<1%)

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Hong Kong Travel Helpers

  • Kate T.

    Singapore is near our country, and I've been there a couple of times. Hopefully I can help other travelers by answering queries about transportation, hotels, food, and places to see. While locals would definitely be more knowledgeable, its nice to hear feedback from tourist like me :)

    Ask Kate T. a question about Hong Kong
  • simony

    My home town

    Ask simony a question about Hong Kong
  • nini

    spent 1 week in hong kong in feb 2004. see lantau island with the large buddha. enjoy the view from victoria peak after the ride up on the scary funicular railway.
    enjoy the ferry rides across the river to Kowloon.

    Ask nini a question about Hong Kong
  • Where2next

    I lived and worked in Hong Kong for 7 years and I go back almost every year. I know the Hong Kong side better than the Kowloon side. Causeway Bay was my stomping grounds!

    Ask Where2next a question about Hong Kong
  • Hong Kong Photo

    As a foreigner from the Netherlands I moved to Hong Kong 40 years ago and was all over this place in the years, I think I know every corner and know the pro's and con's of this place.
    Know the cheap and the expensive places for shopping, with or without traps.

    Ask Hong Kong Photo a question about Hong Kong

Accommodation in Hong Kong

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