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Ireland

Photo © LaoLao8888

Travel Guide Europe Ireland

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Introduction

The Beara Pennisula

The Beara Pennisula

© All Rights Reserved DeniseP

Though the strife of its political conflict over the last half-century might suggest otherwise, Irish hospitality is warm and inviting, providing an excellent framework for touring the nation's many attractions. Pubs occupy many a street corner, and the merry atmosphere is often accented by someone playing the fiddle, accordion or singing. Georgian-style houses line the streets in Dublin, but here the fundamental irony of modern-day Ireland is best exemplified: often, inside these historical houses, thriving computer and telecommunications industries operate. The simultaneous actions of treasuring the past and latching onto the current day's competitive international market create an interesting tension, one which for the most part has not done Ireland any harm. Of course, the booming economy has pushed the standard of living up, with one negative side effect for the traveller: Ireland's not a cheap destination.

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Brief History

Most of Ireland was covered with ice until the end of the last ice age over 9,000 years ago. Sea-levels were much lower and Ireland, and its neighbor Britain, were a part of continental Europe rather than being islands. Mesolithic stone age inhabitants arrived some time after 8,000 BC. Agriculture was introduced around 4,500 to 4,000 BC when sheep, goats, cattle and cereals were imported from the Iberian peninsula. The Chronicle of Ireland records that in 431 AD Bishop Palladius arrived in Ireland on a mission from Pope Celestine I to minister to the Irish "already believing in Christ." The same chronicle records that Saint Patrick, Ireland's patron saint, arrived a year later. There has always been a debate about these missions but it is likely that they actually both took place, causing the older druid traditions to collapse in the face of the new religion.

In the 7th century AD, a concept of national kingship gradually became articulated through the concept of a High King of Ireland. The High King was chosen amongst other lower kings, which still ruled their own little Kingdoms. In the 12th century the Norman invasions took place. The Norman rulers and the native Irish elites intermarried and the areas under Norman rule became Gaelicised. In 1199, John became the King of England and the Lord of Ireland. The Irish parliament passed the Statutes of Kilkenny in 1367. These were laws designed to prevent the assimilation of the Normans into Irish society by requiring English subjects in Ireland to speak English, follow English customs and abide by English law.
The English Crown control remained relatively unshaken in the area around Dublin known as The Pale. English rule of law was reinforced and expanded, however, in the sixteenth century leading to the Tudor reconquest of Ireland. A near complete conquest was achieved by the turn of the seventeenth century following the Nine Years' War and the Flight of the Earls. This control was further consolidated during the seventeenth century. This century witnessed English and Scottish colonization in the Plantations of Ireland, the Wars of the Three Kingdoms and the Williamite War. The religious struggles of the 17th century left a deep sectarian division in Ireland. Religious allegiance now determined the perception in law of loyalty to the Irish King and Parliament.

The Great Famine of the 1840s caused the deaths of one million Irish people. Over a million more emigrated to escape it. By the end of the decade, half of all immigration to the United States was from Ireland. The 19th and early 20th century saw the rise of modern Irish nationalism, primarily among the Roman Catholic population. After a couple of failed attempts Ireland became independent in 1920, while at the same time Northern Ireland was created. Disagreements over the provisions of the treaty led to a split in the nationalist movement and a subsequent civil war. The civil war officially ended in May 1923.

Although being neutral in World War II, Ireland gave support to the Allies in many ways. In 1973 Ireland became a member of the EU, and it introduced the Euro (€) in 2002.

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Geography

Ireland is an island in Western Europe, located directly west of the United Kingdom. It shares international borders with the United Kingdom because of Northern Ireland. It has a total area of 84,421 km2 (32,595 sq mi) and is separated from Great Britain by the Irish Sea and from mainland Europe (France) by the Celtic Sea. Located in the northwest of Europe it also borders the Atlantic Ocean to the western coastlines. The main geographical features of Ireland are low central plains surrounded by a ring of coastal mountains. The highest peak is Carrauntoohil at 1,041 metres (3,415 feet) above sea level. The western coastline is rugged, with many islands, peninsulas, headlands and bays. The island is bisected by the River Shannon, which at 386 kilometres is the longest river in Ireland and flows south from County Cavan in Ulster to meet the Atlantic just south of Limerick. There are a number of sizeable lakes along Ireland's rivers, of which Lough Neagh is the largest.

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Regions

Ireland is divided into four main provinces. These in turn house the 32 counties of the island of Ireland (26 of which belong to the Republic of Ireland while the remaining 6 fall under Northern Ireland). This divide is formed in the province of Ulster. For this purpose the counties of the Republic and of the North are divided in the Ulster section below.
The Gaeilge name for each county is given in brackets after the English.

ConnachtGalway (Gaelic: Gaillimh), Leitrim (Liatroim), County Mayo (Maigh Eo), Roscommon (Ros Comán), Sligo (Sligeach)
LeinsterCarlow (Ceatharlach), Dublin (Baile Átha Cliath), Kildare (Cill Dara), Kilkenny (Cill Chainnigh), Laois (Laois), Longford (Longfort), Louth (), Meath (), Offaly (Ua Fáilghe), Westmeath (Iarmhí), Wexford (Loch Garman), Wicklow (Cill Mhantáin)
MunsterClare (Clár), Cork (Corcaigh), Kerry (Ciarraí), Limerick (Luimneach), Tipperary (Tiobraid Arainn), Waterford (Port Lairge)
UlsterCavan (Cabhán), Donegal (Dún na nGall), Monaghan (Muineacháin)

Northern Ireland: Antrim (Aontroim), Armagh (Árd Mhacha), Down (Dún), Fermanagh (Fir Manach), Derry (Doire), Tyrone (Tir Eoghain)

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Cities

  • Cork - in the southwest of Ireland, the second city of the country;
  • Dingle - a small city on the Dingle Peninsula in the west;
  • Dublin - The nation's capital;
  • Galway - capital of the west of Ireland;
  • Kilkenny - famous of the beer as well;
  • Killarney - gateway to the Ring of Kerry;
  • Limerick - west of Ireland;
  • Waterford - along the southeast coast.

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Sights and Activities

Aran Islands

The Aran Islands are located off the central western coast of Ireland and are an absolute highlight of any trip to the country. The islands, Inishmore, Inishmaan and Inisheer, can be reached by by plane or ferry from Ireland's 'mainland' and are a pure look into Ireland's past, with great pubs, people and some fantastic landscapes and hiking.

Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher are located at the southwestern edge of The Burren area near Doolin, which is located in County Clare. The cliffs are one of the most spectacular places to visit in the country and tower above the Atlantic Ocean, in some places above 200 metres above sea level. Together with the Ring of Kerry, they are probably the most visited tourist destination in the country, but still they never loose anything of their beautiful character. One of the best ways to view the awesome nature of these cliffs is from sea level. Several companies offer cruise trips out of Doolin. Try Cliffs of Moher Cruises to check the options.

Connemara

Connemara is another beautiful landscape in Ireland and can match itself with the two mentioned above. They barren landscape is located in the northwest of the County of Galway. The fantastic green rolling hills and (if you are lucky) the blue skies with grey and white clouds are a fantastic thing to see. Driving around Connemara is easily doable in a day but for some better idea of this magnificent landscape, try and visit for some more days and add a few of the small communities, one of the castles (Kylemore Abbey is of special interest) or just walk around at some beaches and soak up the atmosphere. It really feels as the western edge of Europe here.

Ring of Kerry

Slea Head - Dingle Peninsula

Slea Head - Dingle Peninsula

© All Rights Reserved Cynthie

The Ring of Kerry probably is one the most scenic routes in Ireland, if not Europe. It is a route best done by car (or bike if you wish) in the County of Kerry in the southwestern corner of the country. Kerry has a dramatic landscape with beaches, cliffs, rolling green hills, rocky semi moutainous areas and some lovely colourful (fishing) villages. Although the route mostly runs along the coastline, it is worth getting more into the interior as well, as these areas are less visited and therefore much quieter. Although technically the route can be done in a day, it is best to spend the night somewhere in between.

Other sights and activities

  • Irish pubs - of course
  • Celtic music - again, of course
  • Skelligs - including Skellig Michael, rocky islands off the coast of Kerry, on the UNESCO World Heritage List.
  • Wicklow Mountains - near Dublin, popular weekend retreat with great walks and views.
  • Blarney Castle - near Cork
  • The Burren - a fantastic landscape in Ireland's west
The Burren

The Burren

© All Rights Reserved Utrecht

  • Dingle Peninsula - one of the lesser known peninsulas in the west, but maybe the most beautiful with spectacular rides, views and beaches.

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Events and Festivals

  • Saint Patrick's Day (Irish: Lá ’le Pádraig or Lá Fhéile Pádraig) is Ireland's famous national holiday, celebrating one of Ireland's patron saints, Saint Patrick.
  • The Willie Clancy Summer School and festival is a traditional Irish music summer school held in Miltown Malbay in County Clare. It was set up in 1973 in memory of the famous local piper Willie Clancy and now attracts almost 1,000 students from around the world. It is held during the first week of July, which is referred to as the Willie Week.
  • The West Cork Literary Festival has been running for almost 15 years now in the quaint quay-side town of Bantry straddling the Beara and Mizen peninsulas. The festival runs from the first Sunday of July each year - for a week - and sees some of the most respected names in world literature take to the podiums and stages of Bantry and also mingling with the people in the towns wonderful bars and restaurants. Each year the festival hosts numerous 3 day and 5 day workshops; given under the tutelage of highly-respected and household names in their various fields of expertise - from the short story, poetry, writing for radio to travel writing and food writing. West Cork Literary Festival has it all.

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Weather

Ireland has a typical maritime climate with cool summers and mild winters. June to September is summer season with temperatures between 16 °C and 20 °C and nights around 10 °C. Winters are still above zero, even at night. The highest and lowest temperatures possible are just above 30 °C and just below -10 °C. The east and south are somewhat warmer during summer compared to the north and west, while the west and southwest is even milder during winter. Also, temperatures more inland can be a bit higher in summer and a bit colder in winter.

Precipitation is evenly distributed throughout the year, with autumn and winter being the wettest time and spring being the driest month. The west is the wettest part of the country. May is the driest and most sunny month of the year.

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Getting There

Unless you're coming from Northern Ireland, the options for getting to Ireland are limited to air and sea.

By Plane

Dublin Airport (external link: Dublin Airport, IATA: DUB, ICAO: EIDW), located 10 kilometres north of Dublin, remains the main gateway to Ireland despite the increasing number international flights flying into two other international airports, Shannon International Airport (IATA: SNN, ICAO: EINN) in Shannon and Cork Airport (IATA: ORK, ICAO: EICK) in Cork.

The national carrier, Aer Lingus, has flights to many European destinations, US cities such as New York, Boston and Los Angeles, and to Agadir, Morocco and Dubai. Ireland-based Ryanair is the main low-cost carrier in Europe with many connections across the region.

By Train

There is a cross-border intercity train service between Belfast and Dublin, called the Enterprise. The journey takes just over two hours and is jointly operated by the Irish Rail and NI Railways.

By Car

The drive from Northern Ireland to Ireland is between Belfast and Dublin along Ireland's M1 motorway. There is neither border control nor signpost in between the journey to tell you that you have crossed the border. However, one may noticed that the road signs in Northern Ireland are only in English unlike Ireland's bilingual signs (English and Irish). Also note that while Ireland uses kilometers, Northern Ireland uses miles.

If you have a rental car and want to drive it in both countries, be sure to let the rental agency know, as there might be an extra fee on this service.

By Bus

Translink provides services between Dublin and Belfast and also stop at the international airports of both cities. Bus Eireann also operates hourly bus service between the two capital cities, 24 hours a day. Aircoach runs hourly during the day between Dublin Airport to Belfast, and connection to Dublin city is possible with a change of bus at the airport.

By Boat

There are quite a few connections to and from Ireland, mainly to the UK and France.

France

United Kingdom

Isle of Man

Online Agencies
Numerous companies now act as agents for the various ferry companies much like Expedia and Travelocity act as agents for airlines allowing the comparison of various companies and routes. Two well known brands are:

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Getting Around

My advice, as an Irish person, would be to come to Ireland for the sights, the people, the culture and the history, but NOT for the transport system.

TP member jessieanne in the forums

By Plane

Although Ireland is relatively small, there are several carriers offering domestic flights. These include Aer Lingus, Ryanair and Aer Arann. Airports that are served include Dublin, Cork, Galway, the Aran Islands, Sligo and Kerry.

By Train

Irish Rail runs a number of rail links across the country. There are two classes and sometimes there is a restaurant car. There is a so-called Expressway coach network which complements rail services.

By Car

With the public transport being somewhat limited regarding frequency and network, renting a car is a wise decision if you want to see a lot of the country in a short period of time and if you are with 2 or 3, the cost is reasonable as small cars can be rented from around €30 a day. There are many companies to choose from, but Hertz and Avis have the largest networks. Driving is on the left and renting an a car with automatic gearbox is recommended because of the winding roads in many parts of the country. You have to be 21 and have a national driver's licence. If you want to visit Northern Ireland, arrange this when renting the car in advance. If bringing your own car, be sure to have international insurance (green card).

If you are looking to rent a car, Dublin, Cork and Shannon Airports offer a wide range of international brands such as CARHIRE and Europcar as well as local brand Dan Dooley.

Areas away from the airports are less well served although CARHIRE.ie and Europcar offer very central locations near Trinity College Dublin. Be aware that when renting a car in Ireland, cars come with basic CDW insurance that includes an excess liability should the car be damaged although full insurance can also be purchased.

By Bus

Bus Eireann offers a wide range of connections between Dublin and many major cities and towns, although frequencies to remote areas might be low. There is a so-called Expressway coach network which complements rail services.

There are several bus (sometimes combined with rail) passes. The Irish Rambler offers unlimited travel for three, eight or 15 days. The Irish Explorer offers unlimited rail travel between cities and suburban rail networkds as well as unlimited use of the Bus Eireann Expressway and local and city services. The Emerald Card offers rail and expressway coach services in Northern Ireland as well as in the Republic of Ireland.

By Boat

There are several services to islands off the coast of Ireland, especially to the Aran Islands:

  • Aran Direct - Aran Direct ferries are owned and operated by islanders, and leave from Rossaveal. They have one ferry going to Inishmore and one ferry going to both Inishmaan and Inisheer.
  • Island Ferries - Island Ferries also leave from Rossaveal, and have one ferry going to Inishmore and one ferry going to both Inishmaan and Inisheer. Their schedules usually match that of Aran Direct.
  • Doolin Ferries - Doolin Ferries operate out of Doolin, which makes it more accessible to Inisheer. A word of advice, they tend to be a tad unreliable, and will often cancel the ferry if they believe they will have bad weather.

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Red Tape

The United Kingdom and Ireland maintain a Common Travel Area with no border controls, which effectively means that if you are coming in from the UK it means you do not need any visa to enter Ireland. However, photo identification document such as passport or National Identity Card (EU citizens only) is still required to board flights and ferry. If you're not a entering from the UK, you may need to obtain a visa.

Citizens from the following countries do not require a visa to enter Ireland. (Source: Department of Foreign Affairs - Who needs a visa?)

  • Andorra, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Bolivia, Botswana, Brazil, Brunei, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominica, El Salvador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Honduras, Hong Kong (Special Administrative Region), Hungary, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Kiribati, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau (Special Administrative Region), Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Malta, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent & The Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Tonga, Trinidad & Tobago, Tuvalu, United Kingdom & Dependent Territories (* noted below), United States of America, Uruguay, Vanuatu, Vatican City, Venezuela.

* British Dependent Territories: Anguilla, Bermuda, British Antarctic Territory (South Georgia, South Sandwich Islands),
British Indian Ocean Territories (Chagos Archipelago, Peros Banos, Diego Garcia, Danger Island), Cayman Islands, Falkland Islands and Dependicies, Gibraltar, Montserrat, Pitcairn (Henderson, Ducie And Oneno Islands), St. Helena and Dependicies (Ascension Island, Tristan Da Cunha), The Soverign Base Areas of Akrotiri and Dhekila, Turks and Caicos Island, British Virgin Islands

Please note that both Ireland and the UK are not full Schengen member states, and therefore Schengen travel visa is not valid for entry to these countries.

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Money

See also: Money Matters

Ireland has adopted the Euro (ISO code: EUR, symbol: ) as its official currency. One Euro is divided into 100 cents, which is sometimes referred to as eurocents, especially when distinguishing them with the US cents.

Euro banknotes come in denominations of €5, €10, €20, €50, €100, €200, €500. The highest three denominations are rarely used in everyday transactions. All Euro banknotes have a common design for each denomination on both sides throughout the Eurozone.

The Euro coins are 1 cent, 2 cents, 5 cents, 10 cents, 20 cents, 50 cents, €1 and €2. Some countries in the Eurozone have law which requires cash transactions to be rounded to the nearest 5 cents. All Euro coins have a common design on the denomination (value) side, while the opposite side may have a different image from one country to another. Although the image side may be different, all Euro coins remain legal tender throughout the Eurozone.

The cost of living in Ireland is quite high. Dublin, in particular, is an expensive city, though cities and towns throughout the rest of Ireland are markedly cheaper. Within Dublin, prices also vary based on where you are. Areas such as Phibsborough and Dublin 15 are generally cheaper, for example.

Visa and Mastercard are generally accepted, though American Express can be a bit harder.

If you have an ATM card, bring it. It's much easier to withdraw money from the wall than to exchange currencies and it generally gives you a much better rate as well. Of course, chances are that your bank will charge a withdrawal fee, so it's generally advisable to withdraw larger sums of money at a time.

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Work

Ireland is part of the European Union/European Economic Area and, as such, any EU/EEA (excepting Bulgarian and Romanian) or Swiss national has an automatic right to take up employment in Ireland. Non EU/EEA citizens will generally require a work permit and visa.

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Study

Ireland has internationally-respected universities, including the venerable Trinity College Dublin (the only college of the University of Dublin). The National University of Ireland has constituent colleges in Dublin, Galway, Cork and Maynooth. Other colleges/universities include Dublin City University (DCU), University of Limerick (UL), Institutes of Technology in the larger towns/cities around the country and other higher education colleges.

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Language

Irish (Gaeilge) is a Celtic language of the Goidelic branch spoken in Ireland. Although once spoken across the whole of the island, it is presently a minority language. It is constitutionally upheld as the national and first official language of the Republic of Ireland, and it is an official language of the European Union. It is also an officially recognised minority language in Northern Ireland.

English would be the main language of the people however you will find in parts of Ireland, especially Gaeltacht Regions, that Irish is spoken as a traditional, native language.

Many English-speaking Irish people use small and simple phrases (known as the cúpla focal, "pair of words") in their everyday speech, e.g. Slán ("goodbye"), Slán abhaile ("get home safely"), Sláinte ("good health"; used when drinking like "bottoms up" or "cheers"), Go raibh maith agat - ("thank you"), Céad míle fáilte ("a hundred thousand welcomes", a tourist board saying), Conas atá tú? ("How are you?"). There are many more small sayings that have crept into Hiberno-English. The term craic has been popularised outside Ireland in its Gaelic spelling: "How's the craic?" or "What's the 'craic'?" ("how's the fun?"/"how is it going?").

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Eat

In the 20th century the usual modern selection of foods common to Western culture has been adopted in Ireland. Europe's dishes have influenced the country, along with other world dishes introduced in a similar fashion to the rest of the western world. Common meals include pizza, curry, Chinese food, and lately, some West African dishes have been making an appearance. Supermarket shelves now contain ingredients for traditional, European, American (Mexican/Tex-Mex), Indian, Chinese, and other dishes.

The proliferation of fast food has led to increasing public health problems including obesity, and one of the highest rates of heart disease in the world. Traditional Irish food and diet is also somewhat to blame, with a large emphasis on meat and butter. Government efforts to combat this have included television advertising campaigns and education programmes in schools.

In tandem with these developments, the last quarter of the 20th century saw the emergence of a new Irish cuisine based on traditional ingredients handled in new ways. This cuisine is based on fresh vegetables, fish, especially salmon and trout, oysters, mussels and other shellfish, traditional soda bread, the wide range of hand-made cheeses that are now being made across the country, and, of course, the potato. Traditional dishes, such as the Irish stew, coddle, the Irish breakfast, and potato bread, have enjoyed a resurgence. Schools like the Ballymaloe Cookery School have emerged to cater for the associated increased interest in cooking.

All towns have a good variety of restaurants, cafés and takeaways to suit all budgets. A popular place to eat in Ireland would be the local pub, which usually does full dinners reasonably priced, normally around €10 to €12.

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Sleep

There are hotels of all standards including some very luxurious. Bed and Breakfast is widely available. These are usually very friendly, quite often family-run and good value. There are independent hostels which are marketed as Independent Holiday Hostels of Ireland, which are all tourist board approved. There is also an official youth hostel association - An Óige (Irish for The Youth). These hostels are often in remote and beautiful places, designed mainly for the outdoors. There are official campsites although fewer than many countries (given the climate). Wild camping is tolerated but try and seek permission - especially where you'll be visible from the landowner's house. Never camp in a field in which livestock are present. There are also specialist places to stay such as lighthouses, castles and ring forts.

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Drink

Ireland is the home of some of the world's greatest whiskey, having a rich tradition going back hundreds if not thousands of years. With around fifty popular brands today these are exported around the world and symbolise everything that is pure about Ireland and where a visit to an Irish distillery is considered very worthwhile.

Another one of Ireland's most famous exports is stout, a dark, dry beer. The strong taste can be initially off-putting but perseverance is well-rewarded! The most famous variety is Guinness, brewed in Dublin and available throughout the country. Murphy's and Beamish stout are brewed in Cork and available mainly in the south of the country.

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Health

See also: Travel Health

There are no vaccinations legally required to travel to Ireland. The country has a relatively good public health infrastucture, with hospitals, generally good doctors and widely available medicins etc.

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Safety

See also: Travel Safety

Crime is relatively low by most European standards but not absent. Take normal precautions in bigger cities, crowded places and late at night and at quiet streets. Take a taxi instead of walking at those times.

Many roads in the country are narrow and winding, and there has been a recent increase in traffic density. Ireland is currently upgrading their roads, but due to financial constraints many potholes do not get mended in a timely manner.

National Police Service - An Garda Síochána

The police force in the Republic of Ireland are called An Garda Síochána - more commonly referred to as "the Gardaí" or just simply "the Guards". Members of the force can be identified on the street usually by the green florescent jackets they wear with the word "GARDA" written on the back and front.

The Gardaí in Dublin police an area known as The Dublin Metropolitan Region which incorporates the city and County of Dublin as well as small portions of adjacent counties - Kildare (to the west) and Wicklow (to the South). The current headquarters of An Garda Síochána is located in the Phoenix Park - the largest municipal park in the World, to the west of Dublin City.

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Keep Connected

Internet

Public WiFi services are available in many cafes, bars, restaurants and hotels. They are also available on most Irish long-distance Intercity trains, some commuter trains and buses. Internet cafes are available in major urban areas, but are not as common as they once were, due to the growth of 3G data services and public WiFi. However, you will still find them in areas popular with tourists.

Phone

See also: International Telephone Calls

There are currently four main mobile phone operators dominating the Irish market:

  • Vodafone (prefix 087 - GSM900/1800 - 3G 2100)
  • O2 (prefix 086 - GSM900/1800 - 3G 2100)
  • Meteor (prefix 085 - GSM900/1800)
  • Three (prefix 083 - GSM900/1800 - 3G 2100)

Most European phones and operators will allow you to roam on Irish networks, however you should ensure before arrival that your phone can operate on the GSM900/1800 network and that your service provider has set you up to allow roaming. This is especially true for visitors from outside the Eurozone. You can also buy a cheap prepay SIM card if you have an unlocked handset. This can be considerably cheaper as it means that you will be assigned an Irish number which you can be called at during your trip and your outgoing calls are charged at normal Irish mobile rates.
Pay phones are fairly widely available (but becoming less so) and most take euro coins, prepaid calling cards and major credit cards.
The police service (An Garda Síochána) and fire services can be contacted by dialling 999 or 112 on any phone or mobile phone throughout the country.

Post

An Post is the national postal service provider. They're generally open Monday to Friday, between 9:00am to 5:30pm or 6:00pm, and smaller post offices would also impose lunch-time closure. Half-day service is available on Saturday, from 9:00am to 1:00pm. The General Post Office (GPO) on O'Connell Street in Dublin is the main post office in Dublin, and it is open Monday to Saturday, from 8:00am to 8:00pm. The post offices are closed on Sunday and Bank Holiday. If you want to use private courier services for sending packages you can also use companies like DHL, UPS or TNT.

Ireland does not currently have a nationwide postal code system and in Dublin, certain areas have postal areas, given as Dublin XX with XX being numbers 1 to 24. Areas to the northside of Dublin have odd numbers, while areas to the southside of Dublin have even numbers (except the official residence of the President of Ireland - Áras an Uachtaráin - which is designated Dublin 8 despite being located in Phoenix Park on the northside).

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References

  1. 1 2006 estimate, Central Statistics Office Ireland

Quick Facts

Ireland flag

Map of Ireland

[edit]

Local name
Éire
Capital
Dublin
Government
Republic
Nationality
Irish
Population
4,239,848 [1]
Languages
Irish (Gaelic), English
Religions
Christianity (Catholic, Protestant)
Currency
Euro (EUR) €
Calling Code
+353
Time Zone
GMT (UTC)
Daylight Saving Time
BST (UTC+1)

Contributors

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Ireland Travel Helpers

  • Rraven

    Originally from Ireland and before leaving spent some time travelling around it, as I don't drive I can help you out with getting around using public transport...

    Ask Rraven a question about Ireland
  • Deanxc220

    I have lived here my whole life, but I have travelled throughout the country so I know about the different sites around the country, what sort of time frame would suit for seeing different parts, and where is and is not worthwhile depending on duration of a visit.

    Ask Deanxc220 a question about Ireland
  • LiveLife

    I have lived and worked abroad in Dublin, Ireland. A lot of my time living here was spent traveling the beautiful land, east to west, north to south.

    Ask LiveLife a question about Ireland
  • Rhmyers

    Traveled on my own in Ireland three times.
    Dublin, Galway, Buren, Cliffs of Mohre, Ring of Kerry, Dingle, and many point between.
    Love pubs and music... and scenery.

    Ask Rhmyers a question about Ireland
  • ParrotfishJ

    I dont just visit country , i actually move there and live there . Normally 3-6 months in the country .Sometimes even longer

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Accommodation in Ireland

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This is version 84. Last edited at 16:31 on Nov 20, 13 by murphy84. 96 articles link to this page.

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