Skip Navigation


Travel Guide Asia Japan Sumo



Sumo wrestling

Sumo wrestling

© All Rights Reserved gard

Sumo is a form of Japanese wrestling where two wrestlers called rikishi face off in a circular area. The Japanese consider Sumo a gendai budō: a modern Japanese martial art, even though the sport has a history spanning many centuries.

Prior to the bouts, there is a ritual lasting around five minutes. The two wrestlers called rikishi raise and lower their legs and slap themselves, while the referee or gyoji addresses each man.

The larger of the two rikishi gets his hand under the other wrestler’s belt (called a mawashi), and lifts and tosses him outside the ring. The vanquished wrestler returns to the ring, and the men face each other again. This time, though, they bow respectfully at each other in honour of their effort before the gyoji points his fan called a gunbai at the winner.



Sumo Basho

Each grand sumo tournament (honbasho) lasts for 15 days. There are six tournaments throughout the year, with every second tournament held in Tokyo.

  • Tokyo - January, May & September at the Ryogoku Kokugikan Sports Stadium
  • Osaka - March
  • Nagoya - July
  • Fukuoka - November


The Nagoya Basho Sumo Tournament at the Aichi Prefecture Gymnasium in Nagoya, Japan takes place during the first 3 weeks of July. Tickets are ¥2,700 (US$27), and can be bought at the door. The ticket allows you general admission to sit anywhere someone else isn’t sitting, so you can get up close to the action.

At the centre of the Aichi Prefecture Gymnasium is a ring called a dohyō, raised a few feet off the floor. The ring, a circular field created using a thick rope, is covered with clay and sand. Spectators sit on cross-legged on purple pillows.



as well as KellieBarnes (14%), Peter (5%)

Help contribute to this article to share the ad revenue.

Sumo Travel Helpers

We don't currently have any Travel Helpers for Sumo

This is version 11. Last edited at 2:53 on Mar 8, 14 by KellieBarnes. 1 article links to this page.

Creative Commons License
Except where otherwise noted, content of this article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License