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Tibetan Autonomous Region

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Travel Guide Asia China Tibetan Autonomous Region

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Introduction

The main shrine in Gyangzê

The main shrine in Gyangzê

© All Rights Reserved Lavafalls

Whenever the Chinese government refers to Tibet, it refers to the Tibetan Autonomous Region, a province in the west of China. The extent to which it is autonomous is a matter of great debate, as many human rights organisations argue that the Chinese government has actively oppressed the local Tibetan population.[1]

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Brief History

The Tibetan Autonomous Region’s borders roughly match the borders of the semi sovereign Tibet of pre 1951. Tibet was first conquered by an outside power, the Mongolians, during the Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368 CE). But with the rise of the Ming Dynasty there was a brief period of sovereignty until the Mongols took over again in the mid 15th century by supporting the Dali Lama who had fled to Mongolia. Mongolian clans had on and off political control of Tibet until the Tibetans appealed to the new Qing Dynasty to remove the Mongolians in the late 17th century. At that point Tibet in the official view of international politics became a tribute state to the Qing Dynasty. Although the presence of the Qing Dynasty was not felt by the average Tibetan, the Qing government did have bureaucrats and troops stationed in Lhasa, the capital of the Tibetan Autonomous Region. With the decline of the Qing Dynasty, in the mid 19th century, the mountain kingdom of Tibet gained more and more autonomy and by the 1890s Tibet was independent in every aspect accept in name. Any dream of an independent Tibet at that time was ended in 1912 when the new Republic of China paid all the debts of the Qing Dynasty in order to maintain the internationally recognized borders of the Qing Dynasty. Dealing with internal and external threats the Republic Government did not have the resources to influence any control over the internal running of the Tibetan Autonomous Region but the Republic government used international pressure to make sure other countries did not recognize the Tibetan Autonomous Region as an independent country.

When the Communists defeated the Republic in 1949 they quickly turned their peasant army towards the “liberation” of the Tibetan Autonomous Region. By 1951 the TAR was incorporated into China, with limited resistance, by the signing of the 17 point agreement. If the 17 point agreement had been honored the Tibetan Autonomous Region would roughly have a similar government relationship with Beijing that Hong Kong has today. But due to conservative Tibetans and Communists the tensions escalated until the 1959 uprising during which the Dali Lama fled the Tibetan Autonomous Region to India. In 1965 the 17 point agreement was nullified and the Tibetan Autonomous Region was established. Since that time the degree that the Tibetan Autonomous Region is actually autonomous has changed with who ever is currently in charge in Beijing. Many senior government officials have had their careers start by having a leadership position in the Tibetan Autonomous Region including the current president of China Hu Jintao.

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Geography

The Tibetan Autonomous Region is considered a high altitude plateau with high altitude lakes with stunning peaks. Most of the province is used for yak grazing because it is one of the few domesticated animals that can live up there. Tibet shares international borders with India, Nepal, Bhutan and Myanmar. Tibet has some of the world's tallest mountains, with several of them making the top ten list. Mount Everest, at 8,848 metres, is the highest mountain on earth, located on the border with Nepal. Several major rivers have their source in the Tibetan Plateau (mostly in present-day Qinghai Province). These include Yangtze, Yellow River, Indus River, Mekong, Ganges, Salween and the Yarlung Tsangpo River (Brahmaputra River). The Yarlung Tsangpo Grand Canyon, along the Yarlung Tsangpo River, is among the deepest and longest canyons in the world. The Indus and Brahmaputra rivers originate from a lake (Tso Mapham) in Western Tibet, near Mount Kailash. The mountain is a holy pilgrimage site for both Hindus and Tibetans. The Hindus consider the mountain to be the abode of Lord Shiva. The Tibetan name for Mt. Kailash is Khang Rinpoche. Tibet has numerous high-altitude lakes referred to in Tibetan as tso or co. These include Qinghai Lake, Lake Manasarovar, Namtso, Pangong Tso, Yamdrok Lake, Siling Co, Lhamo La-tso, Lumajangdong Co, Lake Puma Yumco, Lake Paiku, Lake Rakshastal, Dagze Co and Dong Co. The Qinghai Lake (Koko Nor) is the largest lake in the People's Republic of China.

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Regions

The Tibetan Autonomous Region has seven administrative divisions known as Perfectures.

  • Lhasa - attractions include the Potala Palace, Jokhang Temple, Norbringkha, Barkhor street, Drak Yerpa, Sera monastery, Yamdrok and Namsto Lakes.
  • Nagqu - attractions include Hoh Xil Tibetan antelope reserve, Purogangri Great Glacier and the Double Lake Special District.
  • Nyinchi
  • Ngari - attractions include Mt.Kailash, Lake Manasarovar, Mt.Gurla Mandata, Tuoling Monastery, Chiu Monastery, Zanda Soil Forest and the Ruins of Guge KIngdom.
  • Qamdo - attractions include Chamdo Qyangbaling Monastery
  • Shannan - attractions include Lakhang Monastery and Yumlagomg
  • Xigaze - attractions include Mount Everest, Tashilunpo Monastery, Rongpu Monastery.

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Cities

  • Gyangze is a town that is famous for its hilltop fortress.
  • Lhasa, The capital, largest city and spiritual center of the Tibetan world. Lhasa is home to the famous Potala Palace and many stunning monasteries.
  • Xigaze is the second largest city and home to a great horse festival every summer.

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Sights and Activities

Mount Everest

Mount Everest from Basecamp

Mount Everest from Basecamp

© All Rights Reserved ChrisEvans

The highest mountain of all, the Mount Everest or Chomolungma in the local language, is on every climber's list to do. But this mountain is not without risks and many people die when climbing or descending (!) the mountain. About 2,,500 people have reached the top and over 200 deaths have been recorded. The mountain is part of the highest mountain range in the world, the Himalayas.

It is internationally recognized that the mountain was first climbed and successfully descended by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay in 1953, although controversy still exists about the question whether George Mallory and/or Andrew Irvine had climbed the mountain 29 years earlier! Unfortunately, neither of them survived their early expedition. More recently, questions about the commercialization have come up as more and more climbers make the climb. Even a double-amputee (Mark Inglis) and a helicopter have made it to the top during the last year, although both did so with risk.

Mount Kailash

Mount Kailash is one of the holiest mountains in the world! Since it is a holy mountain for Buddhist, Hindu, Jainist and Bon traditions, thousands of pilgrims make the journey every year to this remote mountain on the edge of the world. The Hindus consider Mount Kailash to be the home of Lord Shiva, a principle Hindu deity. These pilgrims come to do a kora, spiritual walk, around the mountain. It is believe that one kora around the mountain will wash away a lifetime of sins. It can take several days to complete the kora around Mount Kailash, and some pilgrims complete it multiple times.

The other amazing fact about this mountain is the number of rivers that start from it. The Indus, Sutlej and Brahmaputra rivers find their sources from the different sides of this mountain. Many of the other rivers coming from this mountain feed into the Mekong, Ganges and Yellow rivers. Getting to Mount Kailash is very difficult and expensive, as it requires arranging a tour from Lhasa with a Land Rover. The standard tour, including transportation time and a kora around the mountain, takes 10 days. Some tours include visiting ancient cities beyond Mount Kailash, but this adds about 5 more days.

Potala Palace

Potala Palace West View

Potala Palace West View

© All Rights Reserved Lavafalls

The Potala Palace used to be the winter palace of the Dalai Lamas, that ruled Tibet, until 1959, when the 14th Dalai Lama fled to India. Construction at the sight started in 637, but the modern Palace was build by the Fifth Dalai Lama, who started its construction in 1645, after one of his spiritual advisers, Konchog Chophel, pointed out that the site was ideal as a seat of government. As it is situated between the Drepung and Sera monasteries and the old city of Lhasa. The palace rises more than 300 meters above the valley, and consists of many parts, including the White and the Red Palace, many Chapels, and the Tomb of the Thirteenth Dalai Lama. At the moment the palace serves as a museum. If you want to visit be aware that the number of visitors that can visit is limited.

  • Manasarovar Lake is a stunning holy lake in the western part of the Tibetan Autonomous Region.
  • Namsto Lake is the worldest highest lake is beautiful.

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Events and Festivals

Most major urban centers have a large celebration for Tibetan New Year (Losar) in which many nomads come in from the country side to attend.

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Weather

The weather here can best be described as harsh! During winter, temperatures can drop to below -35 °C, which is not a surprise given the fact that most of the Tibetan Autonomous Region lies at a high altitude plateau above 3,000 metres. Summers are pleasantly warm, but give most precipitation. The spring and fall seasons (April/May and late September-early November) are probably the best times, given the pleasant temperatures (cold nights though!) and generally sunny and dry conditions.

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Getting There

See also: Overland Border Crossings In China

Tibet shares international borders with India, Nepal, Bhutan and Myanmar. At this time tourists can only cross legally into Nepal although it might be possible in the future with India.

By Plane

Lhasa Gonggar Airport (LXA) has some connections. These include Shanghai Pudong International Airport and Xi'an with China Eastern Airlines, Beijing, Kathmandu, Qamdo and Chengdu with Air China, Chongqing with China Southern Airlines and Chongqing and Chengdu with Sichuan Airlines.

By Train

qinghai-tibet-photo-01

qinghai-tibet-photo-01

© All Rights Reserved Tarri

Qinghai-Tibet Railway
The Qinghai-Tibet Railway is one of the newest train services in the world, officially inaugurated on the 1st of July, 2006 with the opening of the last leg from Golmud. Officially called the Qingzang Railway, it travels from Xining in Qinghai province, China, to Lhasa. There are, however, other cities in China, where you can get on the train and travel directly to the Tibetan capital, including all the way from Beijing, Shanghai, Chengdu and even Guangzhou. From Golmud, it's 1,142 kilometres, from Xining about 1,950 kilometres. The line includes the Tanggula Pass, which, at 5,072 metres above sea level, is the world's highest rail track. The 1,338-metre-long Fenghuoshan tunnel is the highest rail tunnel in the world at 4,905 metres above sea level. Over 80% of the Golmud-Lhasa train is at an altitude of more than 4,000 metres and there are oxygen supplies are available for each passsenger in the train, hopefully preventing altitude sickness. It is expected that new lines and branches will open, connecting Lhasa with other places like Nyinchi, Shigatse and Xigaze and even on to the border with Nepal. Some of the constructions have begun already and most of them will be completed before 2020. Rumors about extensions towards India and other Asian countries are not more than rumors!

By Bus

The train from Golmud makes buses not a reasonable option anymore to reach China.

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Getting Around

Traveling in the Tibetan Autonomous Region can be quite difficult. The roads in most areas are very basic, although improving, and weather can be extreme any time of the year. The most difficult part of moving around the Tibetan Autonomous Region is the fact that most local transport is off limits or randomly goes off limits to non Tibetan Autonomous Region residents. Making it that traveler’s must hire cars with drivers or in most cases land rovers with drivers when the roads become more basic. Also many areas of the Tibetan Autonomous Region require extra permits other then just the Tibet Permit, which can sometimes take a few days to be processed. Although expensive luckily the hiring of vehicles is very easy to do in Lhasa and other travelers can usually be found on the different message boards located in hostels and cafes. Almost all of the travel agencies in Lhasa offer vehicle hire and arrangement of permits for other areas in the Tibetan Autonomous Region .

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Red Tape

In the last few years the permits and red tape for entering the Tibetan Autonomous Region have been constantly changing. Many hoped with the opening of the railroad that for foreigners the annoying Tibet Permit would no longer be needed. Due to events of March 2008 everything dealing with permits has gone haywire. It is recommended to either contact hostels in Chengdu or Chinese travel agencies to find out the most current information.

  • Tibet Tour is a good government travel agency and is good at responding to emails.
  • Tibet F.I.T. is another government travel agency based in Lhasa and has offices in Chengdu and Kathmandu. They are very helpful and can arrange any kind of trip.

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Eat

No trip to Tibet is complete without having tried some yak meat, a standard part of any Tibettan diet. It can be eaten raw, boiled with spices or dried.

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Drink

  • Tibetan Barley Wine is brewed from fermented barley grown in the highlands and is the favourite alcoholic drink of the the Tibetans. The wine is mild, slightly sweet and sour, and contains little alcohol. The taste can differ due to the brewing method and duration.
  • Butter Tea is based on a special black tea from an area called Pemagul in Tibet mixed with butter and milk (usually yak).

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Health

See also Travel Health

Altitude Sickness is the major health concern here, so try to limit your movements during the first couple of days and gradually ascent if you can. Also drink enough fluids (but not too much) and eat healthy and small portions at a time.

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Safety

See also Travel Safety

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Keep Connected

Phone

See also International Telephone Calls

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References

  1. 1 International Campaign for Tibet - http://www.savetibet.org/tibet/humanrights/index.php

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This is version 51. Last edited at 10:08 on Jun 16, 14 by Utrecht. 19 articles link to this page.

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