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Vojvodina

Photo © Radonich

Travel Guide Europe Serbia Vojvodina

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Introduction

Vojvodina is an autonomous province in the northern part of Serbia, bordering Hungary, Croatia, and Romania. Its capital Novi Sad, the second largest city of Serbia after Belgrade. Apart from the Serbian language, there are also about 14% native Hungarian speakers in Vojvodina. It has a multi-ethnic and multi-cultural identity, there are more than 26 ethnic groups in the province, which has six official languages

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Geography

Vojvodina occupies the northern quarter of Serbia, in the southeast part of the Pannonian Plain, the plain that remained when the Pliocene Pannonian Sea dried out. As a consequence of this, Vojvodina is rich in fertile loamy loess soil, covered with a layer of chernozem. It has a population of about 2 million (about 27% of Serbia's total). The region is divided by the Danube and Tisa rivers into: Bačka in the northwest, Banat in the east and Syrmia (Srem) in the southwest. A small part of the Mačva region is also located in Vojvodina, in the Srem District. Today, the western part of Syrmia is in Croatia, the northern part of Bačka is in Hungary, the eastern part of Banat is in Romania (with a small piece in Hungary), while Baranja (which is between the Danube and the Drava) is in Hungary and Croatia. Vojvodina has a total surface area of 21,500 km2. Vojvodina is also part of the Danube-Kris-Mures-Tisa euroregion.

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Cities

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Sights and Activities

  • Fruska Gora - a gently sloping hill south of Novi Sad is the second closest thing that Vojvodina has to a mountain (the closest thing being Vršački Breg, which rises above Vršac). It possesses a dozen of monasteries of the Serbian Orthodox Church built between 15-19th centuries by Serbian settlers from the South. Combining the European Baroque with the Byzantine traditions of the Balkans, these churches had a cultural importance as a bridge between the Southern and the Northern Serbs.
  • Sremski Karlovci - became famous in 1699 when the Austrians and the Turks signed there the “Peace of Karlowitz” ejecting the Ottomans decisively from Vojvodina and Croatia. It has also long been a cultural seat of the Serbs in Austria-Hungary. It contains the Patriarchate of Serbian Church (approved by Leopold of Austria) and the oldest Serbian gymnasium (1791). Today belonging to the municipality of Novi Sad, it remains one of the most picturesque towns in the country.
  • Dundjerski Castle - Vojvodina has more than twenty castles belonging mostly to German, Magyar, and Serbian noble families in the past, and the Dunjerski Castle is the most visited one.
  • Palic Lake - one of the oldest tourist attractions in the country, dating back to the 1840s, when it was not only a popular weekend escape, but also a spa for well-to-do middle class and nobility.

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This is version 1. Last edited at 11:06 on Feb 17, 15 by Utrecht. 2 articles link to this page.

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