A Day In Beautiful Belfast.

Community Highlights Europe A Day In Beautiful Belfast.

Next day we set out to have a look round Belfast. I was particularly interested in the political murals that are distributed all around the city. The area we were in was not far from Divis Road which has international political murals. We decided to start by going there. In the same area stands Saint Peter's Cathedral. This is the city's Catholic Cathedral and its located in the Falls Road area. We had hoped to go inside the cathedral, but there was a funeral going on so we could not intrude and of course we could not take many photos either.

St Patrick's Cathedral.

St Patrick's Cathedral.

After the cathedral we began looking at the murals on Divis Road. Some were about Ireland and some were about conflicts in other countries such as Palestine, South Africa, Cuba. Many of the people viewing the murals were on a cab tour. I think this is a good idea because the murals are all over the place, plus you can learn the history of each one. First, I viewed the murals close up then I crossed the road to take photos. When I was crossing back, a car suddenly came round the corner towards me and I had to run to avoid it. Suddenly I felt an intense pain in the back of my leg like I'd just been shot. I don't know how I got across the road and not hit by the car. Fear and adrenaline, I'd say. Of course, I had not been shot, I had pulled my calf muscle and I could now scarcely walk. Peter wanted to take me home, but I was being stubborn. Our Peru holiday had been ruined. I had no intention of ruining Belfast too. I insisted on limping on in agony as far as St Anne's Cathedral - the Anglican Cathedral of Belfast. Then I had to admit defeat, limp home, apply deep heat, put on an elasticated bandage, elevate my leg, take two ibuprofen and rest a bit.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Green post box.

Green post box.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Murals.

Saint Anne's Cathedral.

Saint Anne's Cathedral.

After resting for about an hour or so, I decided to brave trying to walk, so that our trip wouldn't be ruined. I had wanted to go to Queens University, the Museum of Ulster and the botanic gardens, but they were a bit of a walk away. We decided we'd go anyway but take the bus, so we caught a 7b from Howard Street which dropped us at the university, which is right next to the gardens.

Queen's University is a very impressive looking building. It opened in 1849 and was originally known as Queen's College, Belfast. The area around the university seems pleasant and peaceful.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

Queen's University.

After wandering the university we wandered the Botanical Gardens. The Ulster Museum is here too, but we did not try to go in as I think it would have already been closed. The gardens has a glass palm house and ravine house which were closed when we visited. We wandered around the lawns and the beautiful rose garden. There seemed to be various sculptures made out of discarded rubbish to shame people into recycling. I noticed a statue of Lord Kelvin who I associate with Glasgow - the River Kelvin, Kelvin Hall etc. I had not realised he was born in Belfast to a Scottish|Irish family.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.



Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Botanic Gardens.

Recycling Statue.

Recycling Statue.

Recycling Statue.

Recycling Statue.

Lord Kelvin.

Lord Kelvin.

I had enjoyed our meal in a local pub the night before, but hubbie had tracked down the local Wetherspoon's, The Bridge on Bruce Street, much cheaper than the local pubs. Hubbie had fish and chips and I had pepperoni pizza.

Dinner.

Dinner.

Dinner.

Dinner.

Next morning we went back to the area with the political murals. We walked further and found the Bobby Sands wall. This is all recent history. I still remember the hunger strikes when it was all happening. There is a street nearby dividing the Catholic Falls Road area from the Protestant Shankhill area with a famous Peace Wall, but frustratingly we ran out of time and had to head for the airport. All that rush and of course Flybe was an hour and a half late anyway. Took a bus to Edinburgh Waverley and had a quick walk along Princes Street Gardens before returning to Stirling.

Bobby Sands.

Bobby Sands.

Bobby Sands.

Bobby Sands.

Back in Edinburgh.

Back in Edinburgh.

Back in Edinburgh.

Back in Edinburgh.

Back in Edinburgh.

Back in Edinburgh.

Back to Edinburgh.

Back to Edinburgh.

This featured blog entry was written by irenevt from the blog Summer 2019.
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By irenevt

Posted Sat, Aug 03, 2019 | United Kingdom | Comments