Tips to Save Money on Vacation?

Travel Forums Off Topic Tips to Save Money on Vacation?

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1. Posted by maps2anywhere (Budding Member 42 posts) 3y Star this if you like it!

Hey guys,

Please share some practical tips which can save some money when you're on a vacation. I would say that if one doesn't take toiletries then he can save plenty much of space and money. Most of the hotels provide soaps, shampoos, towel, and conditioners for free. So it is pointless to bring some with you.

What's your tip to save money?

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4. Posted by Aggarwalshipra (First Time Poster 1 posts) 7w Star this if you like it!

You can save money like this by going outside to eat the street food which is low in cost, You can also take toiletries from there, other than that you go to a spot by walking depends upon the weather. you can also avoid shopping from showrooms and better search things from local market.

5. Posted by UliS (Respected Member 107 posts) 7w Star this if you like it!

Depends from where you are and where you go, for me clothings (and electronics) are cheaper in Asia, if i go there i start with a minimum of my oldest clothings (2 shirts and 2 pants), but if i go to Australia most things are more expensive there.
For food streetfood might be cheaper, in some countries are lunch specials avaiable, in others breakfast is good value and in some countries supermarkets have ready to eat food.
If you stay in hotels with free toiletries you are not really saving, camping, hostels and cheap guesthouses don't have those things, but consider Sofasurfing.
Early booking of planes, trains and buses saves money in many places, but slow trains can be also cheap (Italy for instance). Hitchhiking (not allways save) or ride shares like blablacar.com can save money as well.

[ Edit: Edited on 27-Oct-2018, at 10:23 by UliS ]

6. Posted by Rohbear (Budding Member 14 posts) 7w Star this if you like it!

Not eating in restaurants is a major way to save money. We often have one meal per day composed of make-your-own sandwiches and potato chips (crisps) or similar. A loaf of bread, peanut butter (or almond butter, etc.) and jelly doesn't require refrigeration. Alternately, when in Asia, street markets offer delicious hot food as take-out at less cost than restaurants. The key either case is having a place to eat the food. Your hotel/guesthouse/campground will work or a public park bench. Don't forget to pack 2 knives: one for spreading onto the bread, and one for cutting or peeling fruit and veggies.

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8. Posted by karazyal (Travel Guru 2128 posts) 7w 1 Star this if you like it!

I guess it sort of depends on where you are. If in your own home country driving your own car you have quite a few advantages. You can even have a hot plate and coffee pot. In a pinch sleep in your back seat of the car too! Usually no shortage of places to store extra stuff.

Assuming you mean going overseas. For me, I would never fly without my toothbrush and simple toiletries like deodorants, a little face soap, aftershave, safety razor, etc. No problem on all the flights I have been on even with security limits for what fits in a plastic bag and what can be a security hazard. I have been on flights that have been diverted and even delayed several days when airports were closed. I was sure glad to have a change of underwear and be able to brush my teeth!

Hotel location can be a blessing for things you can easily walk to. If you choose a hotel based solely on price you may end up paying extra for taxis and other transportation to get to an area with entertainment, pubs, bars or shopping or particular restaurants. Sort of like pay me now or pay me later!

In major cities I like to be in a location where it is easy to use city rail, city buses and simply walk to many things. I walk a lot. Not just to save money it's what I do even at home too.

I like food courts in malls. I like finding supermarkets for stuff I can use in my hotel too. I do like "all you can eat" cheap buffets in cheap hotels. I stick with the basics such as well cooked meat, hot vegetables, potatoes, rice, hot soup, coffee, bread and skip salads that are prepared ahead of time. (Not fresh you can get sick!) I don't trust salad house dressings that are home made with raw eggs too, who knows how long they have been without proper refrigeration! I give sliced meats out on a big tray a pass too. If I get sick that screws me up big time. I like eggs to order grills in some buffets, I will take meat from the steam line and have the cook make it a little more well done like I prefer.

If your hotel has free coffee or tea in the room - take advantage of it! I will sneak in sandwich fixings and beer or juices from a supermarket to save on hotel food. (If the hotel is kind of fussy on this I will sneak the wrappers and cans out and dispose elsewhere.)

For well over 20 years I have always traveled with a little coil that heats a cup of water for instant coffee. (Or tea, or Ramen Noodles probably.) I have used this for long layovers in airports. There are packets of instant coffee and sugar/cream that can be carried and used in a pinch. Did this at a few airports when flights were cancelled or delayed. Whole thing fits into 2 unbreakable glasses with plastic spoon. Looks like this thing below. (Never questioned in airports ever! Not yet anyway!) I have often used this in hotels without free coffee especially for my wake up call! Sometimes I get a sweet roll or donut the day before for breakfast. Good for early morning departures too!

You can find this cheaper in quite few places. I have a clip on plug end for US plugs and some foreign plugs. Below link for photo only. Same item can be purchased cheaper.
https://www.amazon.com/Norpro-Instant-Electric-Immersion-Heater/dp/B01M0Q84BR/ref=cts_ap_2_vtp

I have carried peanut butter and jelly sandwiches to airports. They don't go bad in heat like a meat product. Also some gum and pieces of candy. Cheap stuff from home!

For some people trying to travel on the cheap you can have a short clothes line in your carry on bag. Going overseas I always have a check in bag. I know some people travel for weeks with a carry on bag only. I can't live that way. I like changing underwear. I like my own shaving cream, my own sun screen, my own larger size tubes of toothpaste and shampoo that can be taken in a carry on bag. In my carry on bag I have spare underwear, socks and trousers. And I have needed them in airports! Besides unscheduled layovers or extended delays I even had a big lady waddle down the aisle of a plane and spill her coffee all over my pants and shirt. Good thing it was not scalding hot!

9. Posted by Andrew Mack (Respected Member 522 posts) 7w Star this if you like it!

I agree with Karazyal on all his points.
I'd add that prior research to allow you to visit attractions without having to go on an organised tour can save a lot of money. Whilst some people will try this without researching first, they're often the people that in Bangkok believe the taxi/tuk-tuk drivers outside the Grand Palace when they say that it's closed today (or closing in half an hour) for a special holiday/event, but they can take you to other sites for a very cheap price that turns out to be not cheap at all... ;)
It also usually stops you arriving at a place on the one day per year that it really isn't open.

10. Posted by Beausoleil (Travel Guru 845 posts) 7w Star this if you like it!

We rent apartments or farm houses for longer stays. Much cheaper than hotels and lots more room. We eat our main meal at noon since it is nearly always cheaper than evening dinner. In the evening we have a picnic with things we buy at the local market . . . or skip dinner if we've had a really big lunch. I spend hours looking for cheap flights and it's worth the effort. We also buy everything on our credit card so we can use the miles for free flights. We've looked at tours but they are nearly twice what it costs to do it yourself so we've never gone on one. We usually lease our car and always get a very small one. Researching transportation options before you leave home nearly always pays off. Most city passes are not the bargain they would appear. There is nearly always some sort of savings option on transport for local folks and you can tap into that and save some money. Most of the passes we've seen don't save anything either, especially if you buy them from a retailer. The Paris Museum Pass is a good deal if you want to spend a lot of time in museums; however, the Paris Pass is a complete rip-off no matter how many museums and transportation you use it for. Similar names but very different passes. Read the fine print when looking for bargains and be aware of what you will really do as opposed to what you think you might do (and don't).