Visiting Russia

Travel Forums Europe Visiting Russia

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1. Posted by CosmicWasteland (First Time Poster 1 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Hello. Is there anyone who want to visit Russia but have some doubts about it connected with apprehension? What the most repulsive thing about visiting Russia for you?

2. Posted by leics2 (Respected Member 372 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

I'm curious...why do you ask?

'Repulsive' is a very, very strong word. I suspect its meaning isn't the one you wanted to use.

Are you trying to gauge what particular issues people might have with visiting Russia? If so, why?

Or are you simply hoping to stir up discussion on this forum? Again...if so, why?

To answer your question: I'd like to visit Russia at some point. I am neither apprehensive about it nor do I have any 'doubts'. What I don't have, at present, is the required time and money. It's as simple as that.

3. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3928 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

I've just returned from a week in Russia and thought it was amazing; it was one of the most fascinating places I've ever been. I didn't have any doubts or apprehension beforehand.

4. Posted by berner256 (Moderator 1047 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Please note the identical question has been asked on other travel Web sites. There was one response, which I thought appropriate:

"Don't feed the troll."

For the meaning of this phase, see this link: http://rationalwiki.org/wiki/Don't_feed_the_Troll

While a visa to Russia isn't the easiest to get, I've had no problems traveling there. In 2015 I took the train from Beijing to Moscow, then traveled to St. Petersburg and Kaliningrad. This fall, I'll be in Siberia for three weeks, primarily hiking in the Kamchatka peninsula.

I suspect many, if not most, travelers have doubts and apprehensions before a trip. It's only natural when dealing with the unfamiliar. But once they're on the road, any doubts and apprehensions begin to melt away. That's been my experience.

Frame of mind is important in travel as in other things in life. A positive outlook, a desire to reach out to others, being nonjudgmental, etc., can help make travel a rewarding experience. That keeps me going.

[ Edit: Edited on 18-Jun-2017, at 04:35 by berner256 ]

5. Posted by bex76 (Moderator 3928 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Quoting berner256

Please note the identical question has been asked on other travel Web sites. There was one response, which I thought appropriate:

"Don't feed the troll."

Ah ok, I suspected this might be the case.

Quoting berner256

I suspect many, if not most, travelers have doubts and apprehensions before a trip. It's only natural when dealing with the unfamiliar. But once they're on the road, any doubts and apprehensions begin to melt away. That's been my experience.

Definitely! I do often feel anxious about an upcoming trip, especially if it's a longer one or to somewhere which might be deemed less safe than other places or more off the beaten track. As you said, for me, any anxiety generally dissipates once I've set off and am on my way. :)

6. Posted by leics2 (Respected Member 372 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

Rather than leap to the assumption that a post must be from a troll (unless it's very obvious indeed) and simply dismiss it, I prefer to reply in a way which will, usually, draw out whether a post is valid or not.

I found this approach useful on VT when we suspected that posts were troll/ spam but, as they stood, there was nothing overtly awry (as there isn't in this post). We found that asking questions very often drew responses making it very clear if the poster wasn't valid.

After all, posting the same question on more than one website isn't an automatic indication that a troll or spammer is at work. Lots of people do it. :-)

7. Posted by lilliputian (Budding Member 17 posts) 1y Star this if you like it!

That's a really good way to deal with potential trolling. In this case it just seems like English isn't OP's first language. You can sort of see how 'repulsive' might have been used mistakenly, in the sense of 'a factor that repels or turns you off something'. Perhaps they simply didn't realise the highly negative connotation of the word :)
Anyway, I've really wanted to go to Russia for some time now... a couple of friends of mine spend a year or two living in Moscow and somewhere in Siberia (I forget where exactly). One question for those who have been already: how possible is it to get by without speaking Russian, outside of the major cities?

8. Posted by AndyF (Moderator 1165 posts) 1y 1 Star this if you like it!

Lilliputian,

Russia is tough without any language skills. Moscow and St Petersburg have much more English signage now than say a decade ago, but even in Moscow expect many public sector workers like ticket kiosks to have no English and no inclination to help. Hostels and restaurants care about your business, but the Metro staff and the Kremlin ticket office staff don't; you're often viewed as a nuisance to them, sadly. Outwith the two tourist cities it's got to be worse - my recent experiences are Kiev and Odessa and they were certainly less Anglophone.

I think it is worth investing the time to learn a little before you go. In a few hours of free online sites you can crack Cyrillic, and that is the biggest hurdle. Suddenly РЕСТОРАН comes into focus as RESTORAN and it becomes practical to muddle through taking advantage of the similarities.

A bit more time and you can crack phrasebook stuff.

I went further and did nightschool Russian, which did give me the discipline to study regularly but as a traveller I think the grammar etc is unnecessary, a couple of dozen phrases and you can get by comfortably.

9. Posted by lilliputian (Budding Member 17 posts) 1y 1 Star this if you like it!

Quoting Andyf

Lilliputian,

Russia is tough without any language skills. Moscow and St Petersburg have much more English signage now than say a decade ago, but even in Moscow expect many public sector workers like ticket kiosks to have no English and no inclination to help. Hostels and restaurants care about your business, but the Metro staff and the Kremlin ticket office staff don't; you're often viewed as a nuisance to them, sadly. Outwith the two tourist cities it's got to be worse - my recent experiences are Kiev and Odessa and they were certainly less Anglophone.

I think it is worth investing the time to learn a little before you go. In a few hours of free online sites you can crack Cyrillic, and that is the biggest hurdle. Suddenly РЕСТОРАН comes into focus as RESTORAN and it becomes practical to muddle through taking advantage of the similarities.

A bit more time and you can crack phrasebook stuff.

I went further and did nightschool Russian, which did give me the discipline to study regularly but as a traveller I think the grammar etc is unnecessary, a couple of dozen phrases and you can get by comfortably.

Thank you so much for the advice, that's really useful information!

Post 10 was removed by a moderator