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What Is A Travel Style You Just Can't Wrap Your Head Around

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11. Posted by berner256 (Moderator 989 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

I went on an ocean-going cruise last year for the first time since 1973 -- from Valparaiso to Buenos Aires with a side trip to the Falklands. This tracked part of the route sailed by Magellan and Darwin. At US$85 per night, it was a bargain. I got to see Patagonia from the sea; and followed that by returning by air (from Buenos Aires to El Calafate) to travel around Patagonia by land, including hikes in El Chalten and other areas.

This spring, for the same price (US$85 per night), I cruised the eastern Caribbean, then crossed the Atlantic to the Canary Islands, Gibraltar, Marseille and Savona, Italy. From there I traveled with a friend to Austria, the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine, the U.K., France and Iceland before flying home.

A cruise can serve as relatively inexpensive transportation, with accommodations, meals and entertainment thrown in. That's if you have enough time to travel the slow way.

12. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 671 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

I do excursions sometimes and sometimes I just get off the ship and bargain with a taxi driver to take me where I want to go. The last grandchild cruise I did - 2013 was two weeks on a Disney ship which is totally 100% NOT my cup of tea. Disney is too 'in loco parentis'. We went to six ports. One of them I had not been to and I took the excursion there (glass bottom boat and snorkeling). My grandchild learned to snorkel there which was good. Cozumel I had been to before, but we did the Atlantis submarine which is a pricey way of seeing some of what you might see if you scuba dived. I am not physically able to do that anymore, and my grandchild had just learned to snorkel. If I was younger and fitter, I'd have just got off the ship and taken a taxi to Papa Hog's place and gone diving. In Grand Cayman we did the Duck tour, and then went shopping. In St. Thomas, I wanted to do a helmet dive, but Disney wouldn't let me unless I signed a release stating that I have no health issues and I couldn't truthfully do that because specifically I'm am taking blood pressure medicine (that was one of the questions0), so I just got a taxi to Coral World and we did a sea lion swim - not a ship tour. In St. Martin, I hired a private guide with a van, and we went to the zoo, we had lunch on the French side, he took my granddaughter down to the seashore and looked at sea urchins, and then she went to a Star Wars place in Philipsburg to get a present for her dad who is a fan. And Disney private island, she fed the stingrays, and we went parasailing.

A cruise is definitely cheap transportation, lodging and food. It is far cheaper to go to Bermuda on a ship than it is to fly and stay in a hotel. And after you've been to a place, you can decide to go back - we've been to St. Croix twice for a week and Grenada once after visiting on a cruise.

13. Posted by Teoni (Respected Member 492 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

I had a feeling at some point cruising would come up, I've noticed amongst travellers it is a love it or hate it stlye of travel. I am going on my first cruise next year but it is one of those expedition style cruises. It stops everyday at a port docking there for the whole day and the activities included are more on the adventurous and physical side. It is only the inaccesibilty and my strong interest in the destination that has kind of forced me to take up a cruise. Certainly had to save up a pretty penny since expedition cruises are nowhere near as cheap as your normal cruises though I am encouraged to know that this particular company does a lot to support and grow the local tourism in communities they visit. Even the staff on the ship are all local hires.

As I have said previosly I do get frustrated if I have nothing to do for too long, so I am not sure a normal cruise would appeal to me especially "at sea" days. I know there are activities but from what I have read most of those activities don't spark my interest. In many ways I do think of them as floating resorts where people do actually get out of them from time to time. Maybe when I am less physically able (and perhaps less itchy footed) I might appreciate this style of travel a lot more but I guess while I still have my health I'm going to do all the physical stuff I can do while I can.

Also from the people I know who have cruised they describe it as a bit of druken debauchary I don't know if just happens to be the cruises they went on (the descriptions above don't sound so bad) but that also has probably tainted my image of cruisng.

[ Edit: Edited on 12-Jul-2017, at 22:10 by Teoni ]

14. Posted by AndyF (Moderator 1057 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

For me cruises are an easy way to cover ground with someone else doing the driving. I ignore most of the entertainment, but the food and accommodation is fine.

For destinations like Norway, Iceland and Spitsbergen it's proved much cheaper than my shore based holidays there. I get off the ship and go hiking, which is usually practical from the quayside. Other times I've hired a car for a day (Leknes, for seeing the Lofoten Islands) or hopped on a bus. So definitely not a less physical option. I've never put on weight on a cruise!

15. Posted by berner256 (Moderator 989 posts) 49w Star this if you like it!

I love food (including doughnuts) and enjoyed the bountiful buffet on the initial days of a three-week cruise. Then I watched passengers getting tans and quickly resolved to skip the buffet, opting for the portion-controlled restaurants and to work the well-equipped gym. Walked the decks for extra exercise.

Looking to cruise the Southern Ocean and the Arctic regions; and perhaps the South Pacific.

16. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 671 posts) 48w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Teoni

Also from the people I know who have cruised they describe it as a bit of druken debauchary I don't know if just happens to be the cruises they went on (the descriptions above don't sound so bad) but that also has probably tainted my image of cruisng.

There are cruises like that. There is the "cruise to nowhere" - an overnight cruise which goes out just beyond the 12 mile limit so people can gamble. On those cruises there is not much else to do except drink. And from Grand Bahama, there are cruises on a boat called "Bahama Mama" which does what can be accurately described as 'booze cruise'. Also some of the excursions from the ship it seems to be assumed that the passengers will of course want to have drinks. Some of them do. But that is also the case for a land vacation. We went on an excursion from a hotel in Santo Domingo D.R. and people were dancing and getting drunk on the way back.

There are also cruise lines which have the reputation of having party-hearty hard drinking clients - Carnival is one such cruise line where the waiters get on the tables and sing every night. I have gone on Carnival cruises, but mostly because the destination was one I wanted to visit or was leaving from a port that I liked. You do not have to drink just because you are on a Carnival cruise and there are people on the Carnival cruises who are sober enough to talk to even there.

17. Posted by berner256 (Moderator 989 posts) 48w Star this if you like it!

There also are camping tours in Africa and other places that accentuate partying.

18. Posted by Teoni (Respected Member 492 posts) 48w Star this if you like it!

For destinations like Norway, Iceland and Spitsbergen it's proved much cheaper than my shore based holidays there.

That is interesting because we looked at the option of cruising too but we found it more expensive. Though not knowing your circumstances I should take into account we spent almost two months in the Nordics, the exchange rate was extraordinarily in our favour that year and with multiple people it did help us share the costs

19. Posted by Teoni (Respected Member 492 posts) 48w Star this if you like it!

I have no doubt other travelling styles have a partying culture (Contiki anyone?) but I guess you hear about associated with cruising a lot so you can't help but have it influence your view. And yes Carnival I have heard is notorious for it.

20. Posted by greatgrandmaR (Travel Guru 671 posts) 48w Star this if you like it!

Various of the bigger cruise lines have their reputations. Carnival for younger folks and being the FUN ships. Holland American (HAL) is all old people with walkers. But Carnival Corp owns HAL , Cunard (stuffy and British), Princess, Aida, Costa (which included the ship that capsized off Tuscany), Fathom, P&O and Seabourn (ultra luxury & expensive)

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