1. Posted by RossBrown25 (Budding Member 8 posts) 35w Star this if you like it!

Hi,

I’m planning to go to Australia on a working holiday visa for a year which could lead to two years. I’m just wondering if anyone else has done this and could advise how much money would be required to start out? I’m originally coming for a 3 week holiday in December and I’m planning to stay on with my girlfriend. We are looking at Melbourne/ The Gold Coast in particular or can anyone recommend somewhere that’d be any better? Is December too late to find rural work in peak Summer for fruit picking etc? Or is this an ideal time? Also do businesses providing rural work opportunities provide any accommodation at all?

Thanks

2. Posted by Sander (Moderator 5294 posts) 35w Star this if you like it!

AUD $5000 per person is the minimum recommended by the Australian government to meet the eligibility requirement of "sufficient funds". Based on personal experience, I'd recommend having at least twice that available, and even more is better. Money can go very fast, even when you're not splurging, and particularly in the big cities; you'll need a hefty buffer for the times when you're looking for work, and then before your first pay comes in. You can earn decent amounts of money while working, but unless you have "in demand skills" (IT, construction, nursing), I'd think of it more as a way to make your money last longer, than as a way to save up for more travelling.

There's be harvest work somewhere in the country at any given time of the year. See the Harvest Guide download for details on which regions have which crop in season when (scroll down that page a bit for the download link).

Note that December if the start of the wet season (which lasts until March/April) up north, which means unpleasant humidity and sometimes torrential rains and flooding from Brisbane up north (the further north, the likelier it is for that to be rain rather than humidity).

That's not to say that it's much better in Melbourne and around. Devastating bush fires have been a nearly yearly occurrence in December/January due to the heat, occasionally even threatening the outskirts of the big cities.

There's lots of areas which won't be affected, of course, but it'll definitely be something to be aware of and plan around.

3. Posted by ManjitSingh (Budding Member 7 posts) 35w Star this if you like it!

I have also experienced that Australian government is not allowing people with average funds to travel. So you should have enough fund to travel Oceanic Countries including New Zealand and Australia.

4. Posted by anniesweetiepie (Full Member 23 posts) 35w Star this if you like it!

Quoting Sander

AUD $5000 per person is the minimum recommended by the Australian government to meet the eligibility requirement of "sufficient funds". Based on personal experience, I'd recommend having at least twice that available, and even more is better.

If that is the case I might never make it to Australia lol . I've read that the easiest way to get there is with a student visa. Is that legit? I had a group meeting here in Greece and they told us it is perfectly safe.

5. Posted by Sander (Moderator 5294 posts) 35w Star this if you like it!

Quoting anniesweetiepie

Quoting Sander

AUD $5000 per person is the minimum recommended by the Australian government to meet the eligibility requirement of "sufficient funds". Based on personal experience, I'd recommend having at least twice that available, and even more is better.

If that is the case I might never make it to Australia lol . I've read that the easiest way to get there is with a student visa. Is that legit? I had a group meeting here in Greece and they told us it is perfectly safe.

The WHV is considered extremely easy to get. Generally it's approved within a couple of days, frequently even the same day, while a student visa takes a couple of weeks.
A student visa requires you to be a student, and to be studying somewhere, which probably entails a lot of costs just for the university - on top of the general living costs, which you'll still need. You might travel around less (due to studying), and so save some money there, but on the other hand, you'll be spending all your time in a city, which is the most expensive place to be in Australia. And of course, you're not going to be allowed to work on a student visa, so no way to recoup your costs. All in all, I don't think there's a better option than a WHV.

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Heh, the student visa requires you to have AUD $21,000 available for a full year of studying. Australia is simply that expensive.